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Full text of "Annual report"

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BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

Standing left to right - Patrick J. McNally, 

Edward B. Rauscher f Chair, and James W. Foley 

Sitting - Elizabeth A. Kilcoyne, Ingrid F. Miles 



Cover photo: 



Left to Right - 

George E. Howe, Retired July 2004 
James W. Foley, Acting Town Manager 



Ipswich Public Library 

25 North Main St. 

Ipswich, MA 01938 






ANNUAL REPORT 

TOWN OF IPSWICH 
MASSACHUSETTS 

2004 








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TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Roster of Town Officials and Committees 3 

April 5, 2004 Annual Town Meeting 7 

October 18, 2004 Special Town Meeting 26 

Board of Selectmen 68 

Town Manager 70 

Department of Public Safety 71 

Police Department 71 

Fire Department 73 

Animal Control 74 

Harbors 75 

Shellfish 76 

Emergency Management 7 6 

Department of Public Works 78 

Public Works Divisions 78 

Facilities Department 82 

Cemeteries/Parks Department 83 

Department of Code Enforcement 84 

Building Department 84 

Health Department 85 

Zoning Board of Appeals 87 

Department of Planning and Development 88 

Planning Board 90 

Conservation Commission 92 

Historical Commission 94 

Housing Partnership 95 

Department of Human Services 97 

Recreation Department 97 

Youth Services 99 

Council on Aging 100 

Veterans Services 102 

Department of Utilities 104 

Electric Department 104 

Water Division 105 

Water Filtration Plant 107 

Wastewater Treatment 107 



TABLE OF CONTENTS (CONTINUED) 

Finance Directorate 108 

Accounting Office 108 

Treasurer/Collector 109 

Assessors Office 109 

Town Clerk 110 

Elections and Registrations 113 

MIS Department 115 

Purchasing/Budget/Risk Management 116 

Ipswich Public Library 117 

School Department 120 

Ipswich Housing Authority 136 

Ipswich Cultural Council 137 

Open Space Committee 137 

Hall-Haskell House Standing Committee 139 

Bay Circuit Trail Committee 140 

Trust Fund Commission 140 

Town Committee on the Feoffees 141 

Waterways Advisory Committee 142 

Town of Ipswich Americans With Disabilities Act 143 

Financial Statements-Fiscal Year Ending June 30 A 2004. . .144 






2005-2006 ROSTER OF TOWN OFFICIALS AND COMMITTEES 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 



Edward Rauscher 


2005 


James Foley 


2006 


Patrick McNally 


2005 


Elizabeth Kilcoyne 


2007 


Ingrid Miles 


2007 


SCHOOL COMMITTEE 




Joan Arsenault,Ch 


2007 


Edmund Traverso 


2005 


Norman Sheppard 


2005 


Hugh O'Flynn 


2006 


Diane Ross 


2006 


Jeffrey Loeb 


2007 


Barry Hopping 


2005 


Ray Morley, Whittier Rep 


CONSTABLE 




Peter Dziadose 


2006 


TOWN MODERATOR 




A. James Grimes 


2005 



FINANCE COMMITTEE 

E2 Elected at Town Meeting 
Daniel Clasby,Ch 2005 
Robert White 2006 
Marion Swan 2007 

03 Appointed by Moderator 
Jamie Fay ~ 2005 
William Craft 2006 
Clark Ziegler 2007 

S Appointed by Selectmen 
Janice Clements-Skelton *05 
Diane Linehan 2006 
Raymond Morley 2007 

E HOUSING AUTHORITY 

Kenneth Blades 2008 

Tone Kenney 2005 

Robert Como 2006 

Sara O'Connor ' 2009 

Edgar Turner 2006 



APPOINTED ADMINISTRATION 



S TOWN MANAGER M 

Robert Markel 
SI FINANCE DIR./TOWN ACCT. 

Rita Negri Ml 

SI UTILITIES DEPT. DIRECTOR 

Tim Henry Ml 

SI TREASURER/COLLECTOR 

Kevin Merz Ml 

Ml ELECTRIC DEPT. MANAGER 

Raymond Shockey Ml 
Ml ASSESSOR 

Frank Ragonese Ml 

Ml CODE INFORCEMENT 

BUILDING INSPECTOR M 

James Sperber 

Eric Colville, Asst. M 
Ml DIRECTOR OF PLANNING 

TOWN PLANNER M 

Glenn Gibbs 



HARBORMASTER 

Charles Surpitski 

Charles Schwartz, Deputy 

HEALTH AGENT 

Colleen Fermon 

LIBRARIAN 

Victor Dyer 

RECREATION DIRECTOR 

Elizabeth Dorman 

TOWN CLERK 

Frances Richards 

PUBLIC WORKS DIRECTOR 

Robert Gravino 

FIRE CHIEF 

Will Maker, Acting 

CEMETERIES /PARKS DEPT. 

James Graff urn 

COUNCIL ON AGING DIRECT. 

Diane Mitchell 



Ml DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC M 
SAFETY, POLICE CHIEF 

Charles Surpitski 7 
Ml PARKING CLERK 

Susan LeMieux M 



SHELLFISH CONSTABLE 

Philip Kent 

SUPERINTEND' T OF SCHOOLS 

Richard Korb 

DIRECTOR OF FACILITIES 

Joe Lucido 



APPOINTED BOARDS AND COMMITTEES 



M CEMETERIES AND PARKS 
COMMISSION 

Arthur Sotis 2006 
Nicholas Markos 2005 
Theodore LeMieux 2007 

M CIVIL DEFENSE/EMERGENCY 
MANAGEMENT 
Charles Cooper 2005 

S COMMUTER RAIL COMMITTEE 
Dorcas Rice 2005 
Joseph Carlin 2005 
Robert Waldner 2005 
Nicholas Elward 2005 

M6 CONSERVATION COMMISSION 
David Pancoast, Agent 
Glenn Wood 2005 
Ed Dick 2005 

David Standley 2006 
Jennifer Hughes 2006 
Barbara Beaman 2006 
Ann McMenemy 2007 
Sissy ffolliott 2007 
Associate (vacant) 

S FAIR HOUSING 

Sara O'Connor 2004 
Tone Kenney 2004 

S COUNCIL ON AGING 

Elizabeth Nelson 2005 
Cheryl Ferris 2005 
Patricia • Parady 2007 
Carol Emerson-Owen 2006 
Tone Kenney 2007 
Carol Poirier 2006 
Vacant 
M MAPC REPRESENTATIVE 

John Soininen 2005 



M6 



IPSWICH CULTURAL COUNCIL 

Elizabeth Loudon 2005 

Kirki Thompson 2008 

Kamora Herrington 2009 

Michelle Shibley-McGrath' 09 

Dorothy Laurence, Ch 2007 

Chris DeStefano 2005 

Priscilla Herrington 2007 

Peggy Graney 2008 

Pamela Horwath 2009 

Pamela Turnbull 2010 

Sunny West 2010 

LIBRARY TRUSTEES 

Robert Weatherall 2005 

Lawrence Pszenny 2005 

M.L. Scudder 2005 

George Gray 2006 

Judith Rusin 2006 

Philip Kuhn 2007 

William Thoen 2007 

Marion Frost 2007 

Nancy Thompson 2006 

TRUST FUND COMMISSION 

Edward Michon 2005 

Jean Emerson 2006 

Robert Weatherall 2007 

GOVERNMENT STUDY COM. 

Rosalie Perkins 2005 

HISTORICAL COMMISSION 

Walter Pojasek 2006 

Wilma Gooby 2005 

John Moss, Ch 2005 

Peter Lampropoulos 2006 

June Gahan 2006 

Marjorie Robie 2007 

Matthew Cummings 2007 



S REGISTRARS OF VOTERS 

Orville Giddings, Sr.2005 
Robert Stone 2006 
Philip Grenier 2007 
S SHELLFISH ADVISORY BOARD 
Joseph McCarthy 2005 
John Pelletier 2005 
Evan Parker 2005 
Michael Lambros, Ch 2005 
Joseph Kmiec 2005 
Anthony Murawski 2005 
Frank Michon 2005 
M BOARD OF ASSESSORS 

Frank Ragonese 2005 
John Moberger 2006 
Karen Rassias 2007 
S WATERWAYS ADVISORY COM. 
Ken Spellman,Ch 2006 
David Smith 2007 
Ronald Cameron 2005 
John Wigglesworth 2007 
Elton McCausland 2007 
Evan Parker 2005 
(Vacant) 
M PLANNING BOARD 

Charles Allen 2007 
Robert Weatherall 2005 
Michael Ryan 2006 
David Santomenna 2008 
Timothy Purinton 2009 
James Monahan (Assoc) 2005 
S ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 
Dana Jordan 2006 
Roger LeBlanc 2007 
Benjamin Fierro 2009 
Kevin Lombard 2005 
Robert Gambale,Ch 2008 
Tim Perkins (Alt.) 2005 
Robert Bodwell (Alt .) 2005 
3 OPEN SPACE COMMITTEE 

Ralph Williams 2005 
Lawrence Eliot 2005 
Carl Nylen 2005 
Glenn Hazelton,Ch 2005 
Ruth Sherwood 2005 
David Standley 2005 
Carolyn Britt 2005 



HALL-HASKELL HOUSE COMMITTEE 

Vivian Endicott 2005 

Theresa Stephens 2005 

Peg Burr 2005 

William Thoen 2005 

Stephanie Gaskins 2005 

Margaret Broekel 2005 

Ed Sukach 2005 

James Lahar 2005 
M BOARD OF HEALTH 

Carl Hiltunen 2005 
Spencer Amesbury,MD 2006 

Susan Hubbard 2007 
M RECREATION 

Edith Cook 2005 

Bruce Bryant 2006 

Kerrie Bates 2006 

Robert Donahue 2006 

Kathryn Sheppard 2007 

Jane Johnson 2007 
S COASTAL POLLUTION CONTROL 

Michael Schaff 2005 
S SANDY POINT ADVISORY 

Joseph Parks 2005 . 

Stanley Wood 2005 
M IPSWICH BAY CIRCUIT 

Lawrence Eliot 2005 

Mary Cunningham 2005 

James Clark 2005 

Patrick Glennon 2005 

Norman Marsh 2005 

Barbara Ostberg 2005 

Ralph Williams 2005 

Linda Coan 2005 
S INDUSTRIAL DEVEL. FINANCE 

James Lahar 2009 
S ACTION, INC. 

Tone Kenney 2005 

Charlotte Dodge 2005 
S FEOFFEES COMMITTEE 

Robert Bonsignore 2005 

Barry Hopping 2005 

Paul Surpitski 2005 

Robert Weatherall 2005 

Harvey Schwartz 2005 

Robert White 2005 
Vacant 



CABLE TELEVISION ADVIS. 



M 



Robert Markel 


2005 


E 


Arthur Savage 


2005 


S 


Stephen Harris 


2005 




Joseph Parks 


2005 


M 


Vincent Oliva, Jr. 


2005 




Edward C. Bryant 


2005 





William Ford, Jr. 


2005 


1 


Greg Parachojuk 


2005 




Thomas Lohnes 


2005 


2 


Edmund Traverso 


2005 


3 


Robert Ryan, Ch 


2005 


4 


MOSQUITO CONTROL ADVIS. 


5 


Lisa Galanis 


2005 


6 


Ian Forman 


2005 




Reta Pelletier 


2005 


7 


Ed Ruta 


2005 




Ernest Brockelbank 


2005 




Ann Wallace 


2005 




Robert Gambale 


2005 




HOUSING PARTNERSHIP 






Michael Schaaf 


2005 




James Warner 


2005 




Donald Gill 


2005 




Donald Greenough 


2005 




Edward Dick 


2005 




Karen Wallen 


2005 




Jay Gallagher 


2005 




Donald Bowen 


2005 





Elected 

Appointed by Board of 

Selectmen 

Appointed by Town 

Manager 

Other 

Supervised by Town 

Manager 

Elected at Town Meeting 

Appointed by Moderator 

General Laws 

1976 STM, Article II 

Confirmed by Board of 

Selectmen 

Appointed by School 

Committee 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
April 5, 2004 

ESSEX, ss 

To the Constable of the Town of Ipswich in said County, 

GREETINGS : 

In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, you are hereby 
directed to notify the inhabitants of the Town of Ipswich, 
qualified to vote in Town affairs, to meet in the Performing 
Arts Center of the IPSWICH MIDDLE SCHOOL/ IPSWICH HIGH SCHOOL, 
134 High Street in said Ipswich, on MONDAY, THE FIFTH OF APRIL, 
2004, at 7:30 O'clock in the evening, then and there to act on 
the following articles, viz: 

Moderator James Grimes called the 371 st Annual Town Meeting to 
order at 7:48 p.m. with 206 voters present. The final count was 
283 at 9:00 p.m. Richard Korb, Superintendent of Schools, led 
the Pledge of Allegiance to the Flag. It was moved, seconded 
and so voted to admit non-voters. Mr. Grimes informed the 
voters about town meeting procedures and announced the meeting 
was being broadcast live on Cable TV. Selectman Chairman James 
Foley recognized two members retiring from the Board of 
Selectmen: James Engel with fifteen years of service and Harry 
Lampropoulos with three years of service. Mr. Foley, 
Representative Brad Hill and Senator Bruce Tarr expressed their 
thanks and appreciation to James and Harry for their years of 
dedicated service to the Town. Certificates were presented from 
the House and Senate along with flowers for their wives. They 
received a standing ovation from the voters. Tellers appointed 
by the Moderator were: Bill Nelson, Shirley Berry and James 
Geanakakis. Deborah Eliason from Kopelman and Paige was Town 
Counsel . 

ARTICLE 1 

To see if the Town will vote: (1) to fix the salary and 
compensation of all elected Town Officers; (2) to choose the 
following officers, viz: Moderator for one [1] year; two [2] 
Selectmen for three [3] years; two [2] members of the School 
Committee for three [3] years; and one [1] member of the Housing 
Authority for five [5] years; the above officers to be voted on 
one ballot at the YMCA Hall, County Road, on Tuesday, April 13, 
2004; the polls shall open at 10:00 a.m. and shall close at 8:00 
p.m.; (3) to act on the transfer of any surplus funds in the 
Electric Division, Department of Utilities; and (4) to rescind 
the remaining balance of authorized but unissued debt: 



Article 


21 


April 05, 1999 


$ 28,000 


Article 


20 


April 03, 2000 


$850,000 


Article 


30 


April 03, 2000 


$ 46,500 


Article 


15 


April 02, 2001 


$ 35,000 


Article 


21 


April 02, 2001 


$ 70,000; 


ction 


re 


lative thereto. 


(Requeste< 



Sewer Extension-Linebrook Rd. 
Fowlers Lane Substation 
Linebrook Rd. Land Acquisition 
Neck Sewer EIR 

Public Safety Study 

or to take any other 
Board of Selectmen) 

Selectman Patrick McNally moved that the Town vote: (1) to fix 
the salary and compensation of all elected Town Officers as 
presented in the town and school operating budgets; (2) to 
choose the following officers, viz: Moderator for one [1] year; 
two [2] Selectmen for three [3] years; two [2] members of the 
School Committee for three [3] years; and one [1] member of the 
Housing Authority for five [5] years; the above officers to be 
voted on one ballot at the YMCA Gymnasium, 110 County Road, on 
Tuesday, April 13, 2004; the polls shall open at 10:00 a.m. and 
shall close at 8:00 p.m.; (3) to transfer $233,875 from surplus 
funds in the Electric Division, and (4) to rescind the remaining 
balance of authorized but unissued debt: 

Sewer Extension-Linebrook Rd. Article 21 April 05, 1999 $ 28,000 

Fowlers Lane Substation Article 20 April 03, 2000 $850,000 

Linebrook Rd. Land Acquisition Article 30 April 03, 2000 $ 46,500 

Neck Sewer EIR Article 15 April 02, 2 001 $ 35,000 

Public Safety Study Article 21 April 02, 2001 $ 70,000; 

Seconded. The Finance Committee voted 6 to in favor and the 
Board of Selectmen unanimously recommended. Motion carried by 
unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 2 

To see if the Town will vote to choose one [1] member of the 
Finance Committee for three [3] years. (Requested by: Board of 
Selectmen) 

Selectman James Foley moved that the Town elect George Markos to 
the Finance Committee for a term of three (3) years. Seconded. 
Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee unanimously 
recommended. 

With no further nominations from the floor, it was moved, 
seconded and so voted to close the nominations. Motion to elect 
George Markos to the Finance Committee carried by unanimous 
voice vote. 



ARTICLE 3 

To see if the Town will vote to amend its action taken under 
Article 9 of the April 7, 2003, Annual Town Meeting (the FY04 
Municipal Operating Budget) , as amended by Articles 1 and 2 of 
the October 20, 2003, Special Town Meeting: (a) by transferring 
sums of money between departmental accounts and/or by 
consolidating categories within departmental accounts, the total 
appropriation to remain the same as previously appropriated as a 
result of these transfers and/or consolidations; and (b) by 
appropriating additional sums, offset by available funds; or to 
take any other action relative thereto. (Requested by: Board of 
Selectmen) 

Selectman Harry Lampropoulos moved that the Town vote to amend 
its action taken under Article 9 of the April 7, 2003, Annual 
Town Meeting (the FY04 Municipal Operating Budget) , as amended 
by Article 1 of the October 20, 2003, Special Town Meeting: 

a) appropriate $5,000 to be added to Harbors - Expenses, said 

sum to be offset by a transfer of $5,000 from the Waterways 
Improvement Fund; 

b) appropriate $4,000 to be added to Harbors - Capital, said 

sum to be offset by a transfer of $4,000 from the Waterways 
Improvement Fund; 

c) transfer $3,814 from: Miscellaneous Finance Long-Term 

Interest to: Miscellaneous Finance Interest on Anticipation 
Notes 

d) appropriate $21,950 to be added to Reserve Fund, said sum to 
be offset by a transfer of $21,950 from the following 
sources: Capital Projects F26 (Asbestos Removal) $1,564; 
Insurance Less Than $20,000 Fund (A39) $5,194; Capital 
Projects Miscellaneous Fund (F3) $3,393; Capital Projects 
Fund F6 (Quint Fire Barn) $262; $11,537 from the Capital 
Projects Fund (F8) (Parking Lot Remediation) 

e) appropriate $6,780 to be added to Fire Division - Capital, 
said sum to be offset by a transfer of $6,780 from the 
following source: Capital Projects Fund (F8) (Parking Lot 
Remediation) ; and 

f) transfer $12,700 from Treasurer/Collector salaries to 
Treasurer/Collector expenses 

so that the total municipal operating budget, as so amended and 
inclusive of override debt service shall total: $11,172,886 
offset by revenues totaling: 492,524 

leaving a net to be raised and assessed $10,680,362. 



Seconded. Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee unanimously 
recommended. Motion carried by unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 4 

To see if the Town will vote to appropriate sums of money in 
addition to the sums already having been appropriated under 
Article 13 of the April 7 , 2003, Annual Town Meeting as amended 
by action taken under Article 3 of the October 20, 2003, Special 
Town Meeting (the FY04 Water and Sewer Division Budgets) , said 
sums to be raised by transferring equal sums, respectively, from 
Water and Sewer Surplus; or to take any other action relative 
thereto. (Requested by: Board of Selectmen) 

Selectman Patrick McNally moved that the Town vote to amend its 
action taken under Article 13 of the April 7, 2003, Annual Town 
Meeting (the FY2004 Water and Wastewater Budgets) , as amended by 
Article 3 of the October 20, 2003, Special Town Meeting by 
increasing the water division appropriation from $1,774,048 to 
$1,804,048, said increase of $30,000 to be offset by transfer of 
an equal sum from Water Surplus. Seconded. 

Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee unanimously 
recommended. Motion carried by unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 5 

To see if the Town will vote to amend its action taken under 
Article 11 of the April 07, 2003, Annual Town Meeting, as 
amended by action taken under Article 4 of the October 20, 2003, 
Special Town Meeting (the FY04 School Budget) by increasing the 
appropriation thereunder and by transferring an equal sum from 
available funds for said purposes; or to take any other action 
relative thereto. (Requested by: School Committee) 

School Committee member Jeffrey Loeb moved that the Town amend 
its action taken under Article 11 of the Warrant for the April 
7, 2003, Annual Town Meeting, as further amended by its action 
under Article 4 of the October 20, 2003 Special Town Meeting 
(the FY04 School Department Budget) , by increasing the 
appropriation from $15,003,142 to $15,169,788, said $166,646 
appropriation to be met by transfer of $94,113 from available 
funds (free cash - restricted revenue/Medicaid reimbursements) 
and a transfer of $72,533 from overlay surplus. Seconded. 

School Committee, Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee 
unanimously recommended. Motion carried by majority voice vote. 



10 



ARTICLE 6 

To see if the Town will appropriate a sum of money to pay an 
unanticipated tuition expense to the Minuteman Regional 
Vocational Technical High School District for FY04, and to meet 
this appropriation by transferring an equal sum from free cash; 
or to take any other action relative thereto. (Requested by: 
School Committee) 

School Committee member Dianne Ross moved the Town appropriate 
the sum of $18,000 to pay an unanticipated tuition expense to 
the Minuteman Regional Vocational Technical High School District 
for FY04, and to meet this appropriation by transferring $18,000 
from free cash. Seconded. 

School Committee, Finance Committee and Board of Selectmen 
unanimously recommended. Motion carried by majority voice vote. 

ARTICLE 7 

To see if the Town will vote: (1) to re-authorize for FY05 the 
following revolving funds established under Massachusetts 
General Laws Chapter 44, Section 53E#: (a) Building Department 
permit revenues (net of plumbing and gas fees) collected in 
excess of $150,000, the purpose of said fund being to finance 
additional part-time help in the Building Department and other 
related expenditures, and to determine that no more than $10,000 
may be expended by the Building Department in FY05 from such 
excess funds transferred into such revolving fund; (b) Council 
on Aging activity fees, the use of said fund to pay for special 
activities, expendable supplies and/or part-time wages, and to 
determine that no more than $10,000 may be expended by the 
Council on Aging from monies transferred into said fund during 
FY04; (c) Historical Commission Revolving Fund, the use of said 
fund to be to pay for preservation of Town records and to 
purchase expendable supplies, and to determine that no more than 
$5,000 may be expended by the Historical Commission from monies 
transferred into said fund during FY05 (source of funds: sale of 
publications) ; and (d) Health Division Revolving Fund, the use 
of said fund to finance additional part-time help in the Health 
Division and to pay related expenditures, and to determine that 
no more than $7,000 may be expended by the Health Division in 
FY05 from such excess funds transferred into said fund during 
FY05 (source of funds: Housing Code Inspection Fees); or to take 
any other action relative thereto. (Requested by: Town Manager) 



11 



Selectman Edward Rauscher moved that the Town vote: to re- 
authorize for FY05 the following revolving funds established 
under Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 44, Section 53EH: (a) 
Building Department permit revenues (net of plumbing and gas 
fees) collected in excess of $150,000, the purpose of said fund 
being to finance additional part-time help in the Building 
Department and other related expenditures, and to determine that 
no more than $10,000 may be expended by the Building Department 
in FY05 from such excess funds transferred into such revolving 
fund; (b) Council on Aging activity fees, the use of said fund 
to pay for special activities, expendable supplies and/or part- 
time wages, and to determine that no more than $10,000 may be 
expended by the Council on Aging from monies transferred into 
said fund during FY05; (c) Historical Commission Revolving Fund, 
the use of said fund to pay for preservation of Town records and 
to purchase expendable supplies, and to determine that no more 
than $5,000 may be expended by the Historical Commission from 
monies transferred into said fund during FY05 (source of funds: 
sale of publications, e.g., replicas of the Declaration of 
Independence) ; and (d) Health Division Revolving Fund, the use 
of said fund to finance additional part-time help in the Health 
Division and to pay related expenditures, and to determine that 
no more than $7,000 may be expended by the Health Division in 
FY05 from such excess funds transferred into said fund during 
FY05 (source of funds: housing code inspection fees) . Seconded. 

Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee unanimously 
recommended. Motion carried by majority voice vote. 

ARTICLE 8 

To see if the Town will vote to transfer a sum of money from 
available funds to pay unpaid bills incurred in prior years and 
remaining unpaid; or to take any other action relative thereto. 
(Requested by: Board of Selectmen) 

Selectman Harry Lampropoulos moved that the Town vote: (1) to 
appropriate the sum of $120.00 to pay bills incurred in prior 
years and remaining unpaid: 

Department, Category & Vendor Amount 

Treasurer/Collector expenses: 

First National Bank of Ipswich $120.00 

(2) to raise this appropriation by transferring the sum of 
$120.00 from free cash. Seconded. 

12 



Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee unanimously 
recommended. On a hand count with two against and more than ten 
in favor, the Moderator declared the motion passed by the 
required 4/5 majority vote. 

(Selectman Lampropoulos asked for a minute of silence in memory 
of lifelong Ipswich resident Phillip Stewart who passed away 
last week. Mr. Stewart always voted "No" on this annual article 
for unpaid bills.) 

ARTICLE 9 

To hear and act upon the report of the Finance Committee 
relative to the municipal budget, and to raise, appropriate, 
transfer money from available funds, and change the purpose of 
the unexpended balances of prior appropriations, all to be used 
for the ensuing year's operations, including the compensation of 
elected Town officers, and to authorize the Town to enter into 
lease-purchase contracts for office equipment having a term of 
five years or less; or to take any other action relative 
thereto. (Requested by: Board of Selectmen) 

Selectman James Foley moved that the Town vote: (1) to raise and 
appropriate the sum of ($10,530,370) for the purposes indicated 
in the FY05 Municipal Operating Budget as outlined in the 
Finance Committee Report, and that: 

for the FY05 Municipal Operating Budget of $10,530,370 
the Town transfer from available funds: 

Free Cash 336,310 

Free Cash (restricted revenue - Library) 15,112 

Plum Island National Wildlife Refuge In Lieu of Taxes 
Wetlands Protection Fund (Offset Conservation Commission) 
Cemetery Sale of Lots Fund (Offset Cemetery Capital) 
Cemeteries Flower Fund Interest (Offset Cemetery Capital) 
Open Space/WSP/Recreation 4% Tourism Promo) 689 

Open Space/WSP/Recreation Fund (stewardship position) 14,094 
Waterways Improvement Fund 

Insurance Less than $20,000 Fund 4,000 

Overlay Surplus 64,618 

Building Permit Revolving Fund 61,500 

Building Permit Revolving Fund (Offset Building-Capital) 15,000 
Stabilization Fund 

Library Construction Grant 60, 300 

$ 571,623 
Leaving a net to be raised and assessed of: $9,958,747 



13 



and 2) to raise and appropriate: 

for Override Debt Service: $ 947,713 

For a Total Appropriation of: $11,478,083 

And a Net to be Raised and Assessed: $10,906,460 

Seconded. Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee unanimously 
Recommended. Motion carried by majority voice vote. 

ARTICLE 10 

To see if the Town will vote: (1) to appropriate a sum of money 
for debt service payments and other costs related to the 
construction and furnishing of the new middle school and high 
school including, without limitation, moving expenses and 
expenses necessary to secure the former Whipple Middle School; 
and (2) to determine whether said appropriation shall be raised 
by taxes, by transfer from available funds, or otherwise; or to 
take any other action relative thereto. (Requested by: School 
Committee) 

School Committee member Dr. Hugh O'Flynn moved that the Town 
vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $2,580,628 for FY05 
debt service payments related to the construction and furnishing 
of the new middle school and high school including, without 
limitation, moving expenses and expenses necessary to secure the 
former Whipple Middle School. Seconded. 

School Committee, Finance Committee and Board of Selectmen 
unanimously recommended. Motion carried by majority voice vote. 

ARTICLE 11 

To hear and act upon the reports of the Finance Committee and of 
the School Committee relative to the School Department budget 
and to raise, appropriate, transfer money from available funds, 
and change the purpose of the unexpended balances of prior 
appropriations, all to be used for the ensuing year's 
operations, including entering into lease-purchase agreements 
having a duration in excess of one year, for a school bus and/or 
for other purposes; and to act upon a request to establish one 
or more new revolving funds pursuant to state law; or to take 
any other action relative thereto. (Requested by: School 
Committee) 

School Committee member Joan Arsenault moved that the Town vote: 
(1) to raise and appropriate the sum of ($15,635,269 for the 
School Department budget for FY05 and 



14 



for the FY05 School Department Budget of $15,635,269 

(2) to transfer from available funds: 

Free Cash 336,311 

Plum Island National Wildlife Refuge In Lieu of Taxes 

Lottery Fund Additional Distribution 

Medicaid Reimbursements 

Stabilization Fund 

Overlay Surplus 64,619 

Building Permit Revolving Fund 0^ 

$400,930 

leaving a subtotal (for the school operating budget) 

net to be raised and assessed of: $15,234,339; 

(3) to enter into a lease/purchase agreement for a school bus, 
having a duration of five years. Seconded. 

School Committee, Finance Committee and Board of Selectmen 
unanimously recommended. Motion carried by majority voice vote. 

ARTICLE 12 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of 
money to cover the Town's share of the ensuing year's annual 
operating and debt service expenses of the Whittier Regional 
Vocational Technical High School District; or to take any other 
action relative thereto. (Requested by: Whittier RVTHS 
Representative Raymond Morley) 

Whittier RVTHS Representative Raymond Morley moved that the Town 
vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $303,126 for the Town's 
share of the FY05 annual operating, capital, and debt service 
expenses of the Whittier Regional Vocational Technical High 
School District. Seconded. 

Finance Committee, Board of Selectmen and School Committee 
unanimously recommended. Motion carried by majority voice vote. 

ARTICLE 13 

To see if the Town will vote: (1) to raise and appropriate a sum 
of money for the ensuing year's expenses of the Water Division, 
Department of Utilities, said sum to be offset by revenues of 
the Water Division during FY05; and (2) to raise and appropriate 



15 



a sum of money for the ensuing year's expenses of the Sewer 
Division, Department of Utilities, said sum to be offset by 
revenues of the Sewer Division during FY05; or to take any other 
action relative thereto. (Requested by: Board of Water/Sewer 
Commissioners) 

Selectman James Engel moved that the Town vote: 

(1) to raise and appropriate the sum of $1,909,391 for the FY05 
operating, debt service, and capital expenses of the Water 
Division, Department of Utilities, said sum to be offset by 
revenues from the water division during FY05 as follows: 

for the FY05 Water Budget of $1,909,391 

Less: offset water surplus $79,563, the balance of said 
appropriation to be met by revenues of the water division during 
FY05) ; 

and 

(2) to raise and appropriate the sum of $1,125,313 for the FY05 
operating, debt service, and capital expenses of the 
Wastewater Division, Department of Utilities, said sum to 
be offset in part by transfer of $78,432 from "fund balance 
- reserved for debt service" (offset to FY05 wastewater 
debt service), and transfer of $40,471 in wastewater 
surplus, the balance of said appropriation to be met by 
revenues from the wastewater division during FY05. 
Seconded. 

Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee unanimously 
recommended. Motion carried by majority voice vote. 

ARTICLE 14 

To see if the Town will vote: (1) to appropriate a sum of money 
to survey, design, and construct improvements to the Town's 
water storage and distribution system (replacing lead services 
and water mains, water treatment facility capital repairs and 
equipment, repairs to Mile Lane Pump Station, and feasibility 
engineering for relocation of Brown's Well); and (2) to raise 
this appropriation by authorizing the treasurer, with the 
approval of the Board of Selectmen, to issue bonds or serial 
notes under the provisions of Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 
44, as amended; or to take any other action relative thereto. 
(Requested by: Board of Selectmen) 



16 



Selectman James Engel moved that the Town vote: (1) to 
appropriate $900,000 to survey, design, and construct 
improvements to the Town's water treatment, storage and 
distribution systems; and (2) to raise this appropriation by 
authorizing the treasurer, with the approval of the Board of 
Selectmen, to issue bonds or serial notes under the provisions 
of Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 44, Section 8, as amended. 
Seconded. 

Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee unanimously 
recommended. On a hand count with one against and more than 
fifteen in favor, the Moderator declared the motion passed by 
the required two- thirds majority vote. 

ARTICLE 15 

To see if the Town will vote: (1) to appropriate a sum of money 
under the provisions of Chapter 90 of the General Laws, and to 
obtain any materiel, equipment and/or services incidental 
thereto; (2) to authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire 
easements in conjunction therewith by purchase, gift, lease, 
eminent domain, or otherwise; (3) in furtherance of the 
project (s), to authorize the Board of Selectmen to apply for, 
accept, and expend any federal, state and/or private grants 
without further appropriation thereof; and (4) to determine 
whether said appropriation shall be raised by taxes, by transfer 
from available funds, or by borrowing; or to take any other 
action relative thereto. (Requested by: Board of Selectmen) 

Selectman Harry Lampropoulos moved that the Town vote: 

1) to appropriate the sum of $217,989 money under the 
provisions of Chapter 90 of the General Laws, and to obtain 
any materiel, equipment and/or services incidental thereto; 

2) to authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire easements in 
conjunction therewith by purchase, gift, lease, eminent 
domain, or otherwise; 

3) in furtherance of the project(s), to authorize the Board of 

Selectmen to apply for, accept, and expend any federal, 
state and/or private grants without further appropriation 
thereof; and 

4) to meet this appropriation by transferring an equal sum from 
Chapter 90 available funds. Seconded. 

Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee unanimously 
recommended. On a hand count with one against and more than 

17 



fifteen in favor, the Moderator declared the motion passed by 
the required two- thirds majority vote. 

ARTICLE 16 

To hear and act on the reports of the Committees and to continue 

such Committees as the Town may vote to continue; or to take any 

other action relative thereto. (Requested by: Board of 
Selectmen) 

The following Committee Reports were read and seconded: 

The Town Committee investigating the operations and financial 
records of the Feoffees of the Grammar School by Robert 
Weatherall, Sr., Commuter Rail Committee by Dorcas Rice, Ipswich 
Coalition for Youth by Elizabeth Dorman, Hall-Haskell House 
Committee by Terri Stephens, Open Space Committee by Glenn 
Hazelton, School Building Needs Committee and School Building 
Committee by Jeff Loeb. 

Selectman Harry Lampropoulos moved that the Town vote to accept 
the reports of, and continue the following committees as 
standing committees of the Town: Hall-Haskell House Committee, 
Commuter Rail Committee, Open Space Committee, School Building 
Needs Committee; the Town Committee investigating the operations 
and financial records of the Feoffees of the Grammar School, the 
School Building Committee; and the Ipswich Coalition for Youth. 
Seconded. Motion carried by unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 17 

To see if the Town will vote to amend the General Bylaws of the 
Town of Ipswich, CHAPTER XVI PROCEDURE FOR DELAYING THE 
DEMOLITION OF HISTORICALLY OR ARCHITECTURALLY SIGNIFICANT 
BUILDINGS", " Section C. Procedure " by replacing the words "six 
months" with the words "twelve months" in paragraph "7." in the 
fourth line, so that said paragraph, as amended, shall read as 
follows: 

"7. Upon such determination by the Commission, the Commission 
shall so advise the applicant and the Building Inspector, in 
hand or by certified mail, within twenty-one days of the conduct 
of the hearing, and no demolition permit may be issued until 
twelve months after the date of such determination by the 
Commission, except under the conditions of paragraph 8 of this 
subsection."; or to take any other action relative thereto. 
(Requested by: Historical Commission) 

18 



Selectman Edward Rauscher moved that the Town vote to amend the 
General Bylaws of the Town of Ipswich, CHAPTER XVI PROCEDURE FOR 
DELAYING THE DEMOLITION OF HISTORICALLY OR ARCHITECTURALLY 
SIGNIFICANT BUILDINGS", " Section C. Procedure " as presented in 
Article 17 of the Warrant for the April 5, 2004, Annual Town 
Meeting. Seconded. 

Board of Selectmen unanimously recommended. Finance Committee 
recommended indefinite postponement by a vote of 5 to 2 . 

Finance Committee member Clark Ziegler moved that action on this 
article be postponed indefinitely. Seconded. 

Historical Commission member John Moss and Edward Sklarz spoke 
against indefinite postponement. On a hand count with 49 in 
favor and 160 against, the motion for indefinite postponement 
failed to pass. 

Historical Commission members Walter Pojasek and John Moss, 
Ingrid Miles and Selectman James Engel spoke in favor of the 
main motion. Attorney Tim Perkins spoke against the main 
motion. 

The Finance Committee voted 4 to 2 against the main motion; the 
Board of Selectmen and Planning Board recommended the main 
motion unanimously. On a hand count with 183 in favor and 35 
against, the main motion passed. 

ARTICLE 18 

To see if the Town will vote: (1) to appropriate a sum of money 
to survey, design and construct extraordinary repairs to the 
Winthrop and/or Doyon Elementary Schools, including original 
equipment and landscaping, paving and other site improvements 
incidental or directly related to such remodeling, 
reconstruction or repair, and to obtain any materiel and/or 
services necessary and incidental thereto; (2) to authorize 
appropriate town officials to apply for, accept, and expend any 
federal and/or state grants and private gifts therefor; and (3) 
to raise said appropriation by authorizing the Treasurer, with 
the approval of the Board of Selectmen, to issue bonds or serial 
notes under the provisions of Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 
44; or to take any other action relative thereto. (Requested by: 
School Committee) 



19 



School Committee member Barry Hopping moved that the Town vote: 
(1) to appropriate the sum of $300,000 to survey, design and 
construct extraordinary repairs to the Winthrop and Doyon 
Elementary Schools and the Payne School Administrative Offices, 
including original equipment and landscaping, paving and other 
site improvements incidental or directly related to such 
remodeling, reconstruction or repair, and to obtain any materiel 
and/or services necessary and incidental thereto; (2) to 
authorize appropriate town officials to apply for, accept and 
expend any federal and/or state grants and private gifts 
therefor; and (3) to raise said appropriation by authorizing the 
Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, to issue 
bonds or serial notes under the provisions of Massachusetts 
General Laws Chapter 44, Section 7 (3A) . Seconded. 

School Committee, Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee 
unanimously recommended. Motion carried by unanimous voice 
vote. 

ARTICLE 19 

To see if the Town will vote: a) to appropriate a sum of money 
to survey, design, and remodel, reconstruct, or make 
extraordinary repairs to the Central Fire Station, and to obtain 
any materiel and/or service incidental thereto; b) to authorize 
the Board of Selectmen to apply for, accept and expend without 
further appropriation any federal, state, and/ or private grants 
for said purposes; and c) to determine whether said 
appropriation shall be raised by taxes, by transfer from 
available funds, or by borrowing; or to take any other action 
relative thereto. (Sponsor: Board of Selectmen) 

Selectman James Foley moved that the Town vote to appropriate 
$85,000 to survey, design, and remodel, reconstruct, or make 
extraordinary repairs to the Central Fire Station, and to obtain 
any materiel and/or service incidental thereto; b) to authorize 
the Board of Selectmen to apply for, accept and expend without 
further appropriation any federal, state, and/or private grants 
for said purposes; and c) to raise said appropriation by 
authorizing the Treasurer, with the approval by the Board of 
Selectmen, to issue bonds or serial notes under the provisions 
of Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 44, Section 7. Seconded. 

Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee unanimously 
recommended. Motion carried by unanimous voice vote. 



20 



ARTICLE 20 

To see if the Town will vote to transfer the care, custody and 
control of the former town hall structure located in the area of 
Elm Street and South Main Street (Assessors Map 42A, Parcel 112, 
or a portion thereof) not including the annex building currently- 
occupied by the Police Department, to the Board of Selectmen, 
and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to sell and convey, for 
a minimum purchase price to be determined by town meeting vote, 
said property together with an easement for off-street parking 
appurtenant thereto, said easement to be in the area of Map 42A, 
parcels 111, 112, 113; a copy of a draft proposed plan is on 
file in the office of the Town Clerk and in the office of the 
Planning Board; or to take any other action relative thereto 
(Requested by: Board of Selectmen) 

Selectman James Engel moved that the Town vote to transfer the 
care, custody and control of the former town hall structure 
located in the area of Elm Street and South Main Street 
(Assessors Map 42A, Parcel 112, or a portion thereof) not 
including the annex building currently occupied by the Police 
Department, to the Board of Selectmen and to authorize the Board 
of Selectmen to sell and convey, for a minimum purchase price of 
$225,000, said property together with an easement for off-street 
parking appurtenant thereto in the area of Map 42A, parcels 111, 
112, 113; a copy of a draft proposed plan is on file in the 
office of the Town Clerk and in the office of the Planning 
Board. Seconded. 

Board of Selectmen and Planning Board recommended unanimously. 
Finance Committee voted 4 to 2 in favor. 

Carl Gardner and Shirley Berry spoke against the motion. George 
Mathey's amendment was ruled out of order. 

The question was moved, seconded and so voted. On a hand count 
with 90 in favor and 88 against, the motion to move the question 
failed the required 2/3 majority vote. 

Several voters spoke against the main motion; Paul McGinley 
spoke in favor of the main motion. On a hand count with 104 in 
favor and 85 against, the main motion passed by majority vote. 

ARTICLE 21 

To see if the Town will vote: 

1) to authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire an option 



21 



interest in land for the purpose of development of a new central 
fire station; 

2) to appropriate a sum of money to acquire any such aforesaid 
interests in land, and to obtain any materiel and/or services 
incidental thereto, including but not necessarily limited to 
appraisal, environmental assessment, title search and similar 
due diligence activities; 

3) to authorize the Board of Selectmen to apply for, accept and 
expend without further appropriation any grants or gifts from 
the state and/or federal government, and/or from private 
sources; 

4) to require that the acquisition of any fee title or other 
interest (subsequent to an option) shall be contingent upon a 
majority vote of town meeting to authorize same; and 

5) to determine if said appropriation shall be raised by taxes, 
by transfer of available funds, or by borrowing; or to take any 
other action relative thereto. (Requested by: Board of Selectmen) 

Selectman James Foley moved that action on this article be 
postponed indefinitely. Seconded. 

Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee recommended 
unanimously. Planning Board recommended against indefinite 
postponement. Motion carried by unanimous voice vote 

ARTICLE 22 

To see if the Town will vote: (1) to appropriate a sum of money, 
in addition to that appropriated under Article 19 of the April 
3, 2000, Annual Town Meeting, as amended under Article 7 of the 
Warrant for the October 16, 2000, Special Town Meeting, to 
survey, design, and construct a pedestrian bridge across the 
Ipswich River and to obtain any materiel and/or services 
necessary and incidental thereto; and (2) to raise this 
appropriation by taxes, by transfer from available funds, or by 
borrowing; or to take any other action relative thereto. 
(Requested by: Director of Planning and Development Glenn Gibbs) 

Selectman Patrick McNally moved that Town vote: (1) to 
appropriate the sum $75,000, in addition to that appropriated 
under Article 19 of the April 3, 2000, Annual Town Meeting, as 
amended under Article 7 of the Warrant for the October 16, 2000, 
Special Town Meeting, and Article 24 of the April 7, 2003, 
Annual Town Meeting, to survey, design, and construct a 
pedestrian bridge across the Ipswich River and to obtain any 
materiel and/or services necessary and incidental thereto; and 
(2) to raise this appropriation by authorizing the treasurer, 

22 



with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, to issue bonds or 
serial notes under the provisions of Massachusetts General Laws 
Chapter 44 , Section 7. Seconded. 

Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee and Planning Board 
unanimously recommended. Motion carried by unanimous voice 
vote. 

ARTICLE 23 

To see if the Town will vote to designate the area of 220-240 
County Road and 53 Fellows Road (Assessors Map 62, Parcel 15, 
Assessors Map 63, Parcel 7, and Assessors Map 63, Parcel 43) as 
an Economic Opportunity Area (EOA) , as provided for under 
Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 23A, Sections 3A-3H, for a 
term of not more than twenty (20) years, for the purpose of 
providing property tax relief to certified projects located 
within the Area, in the form of tax increment financing (TIF) 
and/or special tax assessment (STA) , said area to be known as 
the County Road Economic Opportunity Area; or to take any other 
action relative thereto. (Requested by: Board of Selectmen) 

Selectman James Engel moved that the Town vote to designate the 
area of 220-240 County Road and 53 Fellows Road "(Assessors Map 
62, Parcel 15, and Assessors Map 63, Parcels 7 and 43) as an 
Economic Opportunity Area (EOA) , as provided for under MGL, 
Chapter 23A, Sections 3A - 3H, for a term of not more than 
twenty (20) years, for the purpose of providing property tax 
relief to certified projects located within the Area, in the 
form of tax increment financing (TIF) and/or special tax 
assessment (STA) , said area to be known as the County Road 
Economic Opportunity Area. Seconded. 

Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee, Planning Board and School 
Committee unanimously recommended. The voice vote on the motion 
was inconclusive. On a hand count with three against and more 
than fifteen in favor, the Moderator declared the motion passed 
by majority vote. 

ARTICLE 24 

To see if the Town will vote: 1) to approve the Project 
Certification Application, submitted by New England Biolabs on 
March 8, 2004, for a facility located within the County Road 
Economic Opportunity Area (EOA), on Assessors Map 63, Parcel 7); 
2) to approve the form of the Tax Increment Financing Agreement 
between New England Biolabs and the Town of Ipswich, and the 
corresponding TIF plan, draft copies of which, subject to 



23 



change, are on file with the Town Clerk and at the Ipswich 
Public Library; and 3) to confirm that the proposed project (a) 
is consistent with the goals of the County Road EOA and will 
benefit significantly from its development in said EOA; (b) will 
not overburden the Town's municipal services, infrastructure, 
and utilities servicing the EOA; (c) will increase employment 
opportunities for residents of Ipswich and the Cape Ann Economic 
Target Area, thereby reducing blight, economic depression, and 
reliance on public assistance; and (d) will be designated as a 
certified project for a term not to exceed twenty (20) years; 
and 4) to authorize the Board of Selectmen to take such actions 
as are necessary to obtain approval of the certified project 
application and to implement the tax increment financing plan; 
or to take any other action relative thereto. (Requested by: 
Board of Selectmen) 

Selectman James Engel moved that the Town vote: 1) to approve the 
Project Certification Application, submitted by New England 
Biolabs on March 8, 2004, for a facility located within the 
County Road Economic Opportunity Area (EOA), on Assessors Map 63, 
Parcel 7; 2) to approve the form of the Tax Increment Financing 
Agreement between New England Biolabs and the Town of Ipswich, 
and the corresponding TIF plan, draft copies of which, subject to 
change, are on file with the Town Clerk and at the Public 
Library; and 3) to confirm that the proposed project (a) is 
consistent with the goals of the County Road EOA and will benefit 
significantly from its development in said EOA; (b) will not 
overburden the Town's municipal services, infrastructure, and 
utilities servicing the EOA; (c) will increase employment 
opportunities for residents of Ipswich and the Cape Ann Economic 
Target Area, thereby reducing blight, economic depression, and 
reliance of public assistance; and (d) will be designated as a 
certified project for a term not to exceed twenty (20) years; and 
4) to authorize the Board of Selectmen to take such actions as 
are necessary to obtain approval of the certified project 
application and to implement the tax increment financing plan. 

The exemption percentage to be applied to Map 63, Parcel 7 shall 
be as follows: 2% for each year from FY 2005 through FY 2019, 
inclusive. Seconded. 

Board of Selectmen, School Committee, Planning Board and Finance 
Committee unanimously recommended. Motion carried by unanimous 
voice vote. 

ARTICLE 25 

To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen 
to sell and convey, for a minimum purchase price to be 
established by Town Meeting, a parcel in the area of North Ridge 

24 



Road (Assessor's Map 15A, Parcel 008), subject to a permanent 
scenic vista easement reserved by the town which provides that 
no structure may be placed upon the parcel and any existing 
structures upon the parcel shall be removed prior to the 
conveyance; or to take any other action relative thereto. 
(Requested by: Board of Selectmen) 

Selectman James Foley moved that action on this article be 
postponed indefinitely. Seconded. 

Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee unanimously 
recommended. Motion carried by majority voice vote. 

ARTICLE 26 

To see if the Town will vote to reconsider any or all previous 
articles raising and/or appropriating money which have a direct 
impact, on the levy for the next ensuing fiscal year, as 
contained in this warrant, for the purpose of completing a 
budget which is balanced and in compliance with the levy limit 
provisions of Proposition 2V2, so called; or to take any other 
action relative thereto. (Requested by: Board of Selectmen) 

Selectman James Engel moved that action on this article be 
postponed indefinitely. Seconded. 

Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee unanimously 
recommended. Motion carried by unanimous voice vote. 

It was moved, seconded and so voted to adjourn the annual town 
meeting. Meeting adjourned at 11:19 p.m. 

And you are directed to serve this Warrant by posting attested 
copies thereof at the Post Office and at each of the meeting 
houses in the Town, by publication at least seven days prior to 
the time for holding said meeting in a newspaper published in, 
or having a general circulation in, the Town of Ipswich. 

Given unto our hands this eighth day of March in the year of our 
Lord, Two Thousand and Four. 

TOWN OF IPSWICH 
BOARD OF SELECTMEN 
James W. Foley 
James R. Engel 
Harry Lampropoulos 

25 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 
October 18, 2004 

ESSEX, ss 

To the Constable of the Town of Ipswich in said County, 

GREETINGS: 

In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, you are hereby directed to notify 
the inhabitants of the Town of Ipswich, qualified to vote in Town affairs, to meet at the 
Performing Arts Center of the Ipswich High School/Ipswich Middle School, 134 High 
Street, in said Ipswich, on MONDAY, THE EIGHTEENTH OF OCTOBER, 2004, at 
7:30 o'clock in the evening, then and there to act on the following articles, viz: 

Moderator James Grimes adjourned the meeting twice after 7:30 p.m. as the necessary 
quorum of 200 voters was not present. At 8:03 p.m. Mr. Grimes called the meeting to 
order with over 200 voters present. The final count was 236 at 9:00 p.m. Following the 
Pledge of Allegiance to the Flag, Mr. Grimes informed the voters about town meeting 
procedures and appointed the following tellers: James Engel, Leslie Brooks and Tom 
Lewis. It was moved, seconded and so voted to admit non-voters. Deborah Eliason from 
Kopelman and Paige was Town Counsel. 

ARTICLE 1 

To see if the Town will vote to amend its action previously taken under Article 9 of the 
April 05, 2004, Annual Town Meeting (the FY05 Municipal Operating Budget), by 
appropriating a sum of money in addition to that appropriated under said Article 9 (said 
appropriation to be raised by taxes, by the transfer of available funds, or otherwise), by 
transferring sums between departments and/or categories within departments, and/or by 
determining if a portion of said additional appropriations shall be offset by estimated 
receipts of user fees, in accordance with the provisions of Massachusetts General Laws 
Chapter 44, Section 53E 1/2; or to take any other action relative thereto. (Sponsor: Board 
of Selectmen) 

Selectman Edward Rauscher moved that the Town vote to amend its action taken under 
Article 9 of the April 5, 2004, Annual Town Meeting (the FY05 Municipal Operating 
Budget), as follows: 

a) appropriate $33,578 to be added to the Miscellaneous Finance, Management 
Transfer Account, to pay for salary/wages and other expenses incidental thereto, 
attributable to collective bargaining agreement settlement costs. Said sum is to be 
offset by a transfer of $33,578 from available funds (Free Cash); 

b) appropriate $26,498 to be added to the Miscellaneous Finance, Management 
Transfer Account, to pay for salary/wages and other expenses incidental thereto, 
attributable to collective bargaining agreement settlement costs. Said sum is to be 
offset by a transfer of $26,498 from available funds (Free Cash); 



26 



c) transfer $6,056 from: Miscellaneous Finance-Expense to: Consolidated Building 
Maintenance-Salary; 

d) transfer $12,304 from District Court Building - Expenses to: Consolidated 
Building Maintenance - Salary; 

e) transfer $15,000 from Town Manager's - Salary to Selectmen's Expense 
Account; 

f) transfer $5,567 from Treasurer/Collector-Expense to Assessor - Salary; 

g) appropriate $262,523 to be added to the following Departments - Capital, said 

" sum to be offset by a transfer of $228,660 from Available funds (Free Cash), and 
to meet the balance of this appropriation by raising $33,863 in taxes: 



Police 


51,334 


Fire 


45,000 


Shellfish 


30,000 


Harbormaster 


30,000 


Library 


10,800 


Town Clerk 


11,975 


Highway 


50,000 


Consol Bldg Maint. 


15,000 


MIS 


14,314 


Conservation 


4,100 



Total 262,523 

h) appropriate $134,400 to be added to the Miscellaneous Finance, Management 
Transfer Account, to pay for salary/wages and other expenses incidental thereto, 
attributable to collective bargaining agreement settlement costs and exempt salary 
increases. Said appropriation to be raised by taxes. 

so that the total municipal operating budget, as so amended and inclusive of override debt 

service shall total: $ 1 1 ,935,082 

offset by revenues totaling: 860,359 

leaving a net to be raised and assessed $1 1,074,723. Seconded. 

Board of Selectmen recommended unanimously. Finance Committee recommended the 
motion except for the capital spending figures. 

Finance Committee member Clark Ziegler moved to amend: 

g) appropriate $156,334 to be added to the following Departments - Capital, said sum to 
be offset by a transfer of $122,471 from Available funds (Free Cash), and to meet the 
balance of this appropriation by raising $33,863 in taxes: 

Police 51,334 

Fire 45,000 

Shellfish 30,000 

Harbormaster 30,000 

Total $156,334 



27 



so that the total municipal operating budget, as so amended and inclusive of override debt 

service shall total: $11,828,893 

offset by revenues totaling: 754, 1 70 

leaving a net to be raised and assessed $10,968,534. Seconded. 

Finance Committee recommended the amendment; Board of Selectmen voted against the 
amendment. Several voters spoke against the amendment and in favor of the main 
motion. Librarian Victor Dyer, a non-resident, was allowed to speak to the voters and 
urged their support for his Library equipment that was deleted by the amendment. The 
vote on the amendment failed by majority voice vote. The main motion carried by 
majority voice vote. 

ARTICLE 2 

To see if the Town will vote: 

a) to amend its action taken under Article 13 of the April 05, 2004 Annual Town Meeting 
(the FY05 Water and Sewer Budgets) by increasing the water division appropriation to be 
raised and assessed, said sum to be offset by revenues from the water division during 
FY05; and 

b) to amend its action taken under Article 13 of the April 05, 2004, Annual Town 
Meeting (the FY05 Wastewater Budget) by transferring funds in Sewer Surplus to offset 
this appropriation; and 

or to take any other action relative thereto. (Sponsor: Board of Water and Sewer 
Commissioners) 

Selectman James Foley moved that the Town vote: a) to amend its action taken under 
Article 13 of the April 05, 2004, Annual Town Meeting (the FY05 Water and Sewer 
Budget) by increasing the sewer division appropriation to be raised and assessed from 
$1,125,313 to $1,170,313, said additional $45,000 by transferring $45,000 in Sewer 
Surplus to offset this appropriation. Seconded. 

Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee recommended unanimously. Motion carried 
by unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 3 

To see if the Town will vote to amend its action taken under Article 1 1 of the Warrant for 
the April 05, 2004, Annual Town Meeting (the FY05 School Department Operating 
Budget) by transferring a sum of money in addition to that appropriated under said 
Article 11, said funds to be transferred from free cash; or to take any other action relative 
thereto. (Sponsor: School Committee) 

School Committee member Jeffrey Loeb moved that the Town vote to amend its action 
taken under Article 1 1 of the April 05, 2004, Annual Town Meeting (the FY05 School 
Operating Budget), by increasing the sum to be raised and appropriated from 

28 



$15,635,269 to $15,715,144; said sum to be raised by transfer of an equal sum from Free 
Cash, so that the total appropriation under this article shall be $15,715,144; the total 
transferred from available funds shall be $480,805; and the net to be raised and assessed 
shall remain unchanged at $15,234,339. Seconded. 

School Committee, Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee recommended 
unanimously. Motion carried by unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 4 

To see if the Town will vote to amend its action taken under Article 1 1 of the Warrant for 
the April 05, 2004, Annual Town Meeting (the FY05 School Department Operating 
Budget), as further amended by Article 3 of the Warrant for the October 18, 2004, 
Special Town Meeting, by appropriating a sum of money in addition to that appropriated 
under the aforesaid Articles 11 and 3, respectively, said appropriation to be raised by 
taxes, or otherwise; or to take any other action relative thereto. (Sponsor: School 
Committee) 

School Committee member Joan Arsenault moved that the Town vote to amend its action 
taken under Article 11 of the April 05, 2004, Annual Town Meeting (the FY05 School 
Operating Budget), as further amended by Article 3 of the Warrant for the October 18, 
2004, Special Town Meeting, in addition to that appropriated under the aforesaid Articles 
11 and 3, respectively, said appropriation to be raised by taxes, or otherwise; or to take 
any other action relative thereto, by increasing the sum to be raised and appropriated 
from $15,715,144 to $15,892,539; so that the total appropriation under this article shall 
be:$ 15,892,539; the total transferred from available funds shall be $480,805; and the net 
to be raised and assessed shall be $15,41 1,734. Seconded. 

School Committee, Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee recommended 
unanimously. Motion carried by unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 5 

To see if the Town will vote to amend its action taken under Article 12 of the April 05, 
2004, Annual Town Meeting (the FY05 Whittier budget) by decreasing the appropriation 
to meet the FY05 assessment; or to take any other action relative thereto. (Sponsor: 
Whittier RVTHS Representative Raymond Morley) 

Whittier RVTHS Representative Ray Morley moved that the Town vote to amend its 
action taken under Article 12 of the April 5, 2004, Annual Town Meeting (the FY05 
Whittier budget) by decreasing the appropriation from $303,126 to $283,106 to meet the 
FY05 assessment; or to take any other action relative thereto. Seconded. 

School Committee, Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee recommended 
unanimously. Motion carried by unanimous voice vote. 

29 



ARTICLE 6 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate and/or transfer from available funds 
a sum of money to pay unpaid bills incurred in prior years and remaining unpaid; or to 
take any other action relative thereto. (Sponsor: Board of Selectmen) 

Selectman Ingrid Miles moved that the Town vote (a) to appropriate the sum of 
$19,166.02 to pay unpaid bills incurred in prior years and remaining unpaid: 



Fire Dept. Expenses 


Ipswich NAPA 


$ 28.68 


Finance Committee 


Lynne Gibbs 


28.00 


Consolidated Bldg Maint 


Ipswich Electric Light Dept 


300.00 


Veteran's Services 


Lahey Clinic 


600.00 


Veteran's Services 


Northeast Hospital Corp. 


876.00 


Veteran's Services 


Lahey Clinic 


50.00 


Veteran's Services 


Lahey Clinic 


300.00 


Town Manager 


Thomson West 


297.00 


Water Distribution 


New England Water Works 


480.00 


FLSA 


various employees 


16,206.34 


Total: 




$ 19,166.02 



and (b) to meet this appropriation by raising $16,044.53 in taxes and by transferring 
$2,250.30 from water surplus, $871.19 sewer surplus. Seconded. 

Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee recommended unanimously. On a hand 
count with one against and more than ten in favor, the Moderator declared the motion 
passed by the required 9/10 majority vote. 

ARTICLE 7 

To see if the Town will vote to accept the reports of the Public Safety facilities 
Committee and the Town Committee of the Feoffees of the Ipswich Grammar School, 
and any other Town standing committees or boards as deemed necessary. (Sponsored by: 
Board of Selectmen) 

Selectman Edward Rauscher extended his thanks to Paul McGinley, Chairman of the 
Town Manager Search Committee and his committee for their work with the consulting 
group in the search for a new town manager. It was moved, seconded and so voted to 
accept the committee report read by Mr. McGinley. 

Selectman James Foley reported that the Public Safety Facilities Committee would come 
back to the Spring Town Meeting with its recommendations. It was moved, seconded 
and so voted to continue the committee. 



30 



Bob Weatherall announced that the Town Committee of the Feoffees of the Grammar 
School had not completed their negotiations and would come back to the spring town 
meeting with their report. It was moved, seconded and so voted to continue the 
committee. 

Selectman Elizabeth Kilcoyne reported on the Municipal Parking Lot Committee. It was 
moved, seconded and so voted to accept her report and continue the committee. 

ARTICLE 8 

To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of Section 12 of Chapter 46, Acts of 
2003; or to take any other action relative thereto. (Sponsored by: Board of Selectmen) 

Selectman James Foley moved that the Town vote to accept the provisions of Section 12 
of Chapter 46, Acts of 2003. Seconded. 

Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee recommended unanimously. Motion carried 
by unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 9 

To see if the Town will vote, the provisions of Sections 20 and 21A of Chapter 268A of 
the general laws notwithstanding, to authorize the Board of Selectmen to temporarily 
appoint a member of said board to the position of acting town manager for a limited 
period of time not to exceed the date of the 2005 annual town meeting; or to take any 
other action relative thereto. (Sponsored by: Board of Selectmen) 

Selectman Patrick McNally moved that the Town vote to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen to temporarily appoint a member of said board to the position of Acting Town 
Manager for a limited period of time, not to exceed the date of the 2005 Annual Town 
Meeting. Seconded. 

Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee recommended unanimously. Motion carried 
by unanimous voice vote. 



Selectman Patrick McNally recognized Selectman James Foley and extended special 
thanks to Mr. Foley for filling in as Acting Town Manager. Mr. Foley received a 
standing ovation in appreciation. 



ARTICLE 10 

To see if the Town will vote to authorize an extension to the sanitary sewer system in the 
area of Newmarch Street and Marshview Road, said extension to be in excess of 500 



31 



lineal feet; or to take any other action relative thereto. (Sponsored by: Board of Sewer 
Commissioners) 

Selectman Elizabeth Kilcoyne moved that the Town vote to authorize an extension of the 
municipal sanitary sewer system in the area of Newmarch and Marshview Road, said 
extension to be in excess of 500 lineal feet, consistent with the provisions of General 
Bylaws Chapter XV, Section 16. Seconded. 

Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee recommended unanimously. Motion carried 
by unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 11 

To see if the Town will vote to: 

1) transfer the care, custody and control of the former town hall structure located in the 
area of Elm Street and South Main Street (Assessors Map 42A, Parcel 112, or a portion 
thereof) not including the annex building currently occupied by the Police Department, to 
the Board of Selectmen, and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to sell and convey, for a 
minimum purchase price to be determined by town meeting vote, said property together 
with an easement for off-street parking appurtenant thereto, said easement to be in the 
area of Map 42A, parcels 111, 112, 113; a copy of a draft proposed plan is on file in the 
office of the Town Clerk and in the office of the Planning Board; and 

(2) amend the Official Zoning Map of the Town of Ipswich by rezoning a portion of 30 
South Main Street, further identified as Parcel 112 on Assessor's Map 42A, from Intown 
Residence (IR) to Central Business (CB), as shown on the attached map; or to take any 
other action relative thereto. (Requested by: Board of Selectmen) 

Selectman Patrick McNally moved that the Town vote to: 

1) amend Article 20 of the April 5, 2004 Annual Town Meeting to transfer the care, 
custody and control of the former town hall property, including the town hall structure, 
located in the area of Elm Street and South Main Street (Assessors Map 42A, Parcel 112, 
or a portion thereof) not including the annex building currently occupied by the Police 
Department, to the Board of Selectmen and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to sell 
and convey, for a minimum purchase price of $225,000, said property together with an 
easement for off-street parking appurtenant thereto in the area of Map 42 A, parcels 111, 
1 12, 1 13; a copy of a draft proposed plan is on file in the office of the Town Clerk and in 
the office of the Planning Board; and 

2) amend the official zoning map of the Town of Ipswich by rezoning that portion of the 
property at 30 South Main Street (Assessor's Map 42A, parcel 112) which is within two 
hundred and five (205) feet of the street line of South Main Street, from Intown 
Residence (IR) to Central Business (CB), as shown on the map included as part of the 
warrant. Seconded. 



32 



The Board of Selectmen voted 4 in favor with 1 abstention. Finance Committee and 
Planning Board voted unanimously in favor. 

The voice vote on the motion was inconclusive. On a hand count with one against and 
more than ten in favor, the Moderator declared the motion passed by the required 2/3 's 
majority vote. 

ARTICLE 12 

To see if the Town will vote to amend the Protective Zoning Bylaw of the Town of 
Ipswich by amending IX. SPECIAL REGULATIONS "H. Great Estate Preservation 
Development (GEPD)" as follows: 

1) Amend "1. Purpose, f.", by adding, to the end of the sentence, the following: ", 
including the vistas of the main corridor roads," 

2) Amend "2. Permitted Uses", as follows: 

> Revise paragraph "a." by: 

• deleting the initial phrase "any use listed in the use schedule as an 
allowable use in the RRA District, whether by special permit or 
otherwise, except that"; 

• deleting "f.2 below" from the second sentence under (b) and 
substituting in lieu thereof "iii. above"; and 

• re-lettering the remainder of the amended paragraph a. as " i.", to be 
inserted under a new paragraph "b.", said paragraph to read as follows: 

"b. residential dwelling use, provided that: 

i. Residential housing shall be clustered, and no individual house 
lot shall be greater than 20,000 square feet in size; and 

ii. No more than thirty percent of the total allowed residential 
housing units shall be detached single-family dwellings; 

iii. At least 10% of the total units are affordable housing as defined 
in IX.I.3.a.(l) of this zoning bylaw; 

iv. language inserted per above 

> Create a new paragraph "a.", said paragraph to read as follows: 

"a. any use listed in the use schedule as an allowable use in the RRA 
District, whether by special permit or otherwise, except that: 

i. residential dwellings are allowed only as described in b. below; 

ii. a golf course is not permitted in a GEPD."; and 

> Revise "f." by: 

• deleting the heading "(1)", but not the text underneath it; and 

• deleting paragraph "(2)" in its entirety; and 

> Re-letter "b." through "f.", as "c." through "g."; and 



33 



3) Amend "3. Density Standards, b. Floor Area of Development, (2) Additional Floor 
Space for Rehabilitation of Existing Buildings", by deleting the language in its entirety 
and substituting in lieu thereof the following: 

"A GEPD that rehabilitates or renovates all buildings and supporting structures 
certified by the Historical Commission as having historic or architectural 
significance may increase allowable floor space by the amount of square footage 
contained in all existing buildings that are rehabilitated or renovated as part of the 
GEPD development, except that new floor area developed on the lot may be 
increased by five (5) square feet for every square foot of floor space contained in 
buildings and supporting structures certified by the Historical Commission as 
having historic or architectural significance that are rehabilitated or renovated. 
The Planning Board shall refer to the Secretary of the Interior's Standards for 
Rehabilitation and Guidelines for Rehabilitating Historic Buildings for guidance 
when reviewing the buildings which have been, or are proposed to be, 
rehabilitated or renovated. If the Planning Board determines that the 
reconstruction or replacement of an existing building that has not been certified 
by the Historical Commission as having historic or architectural significance is 
more consistent with IX.H.l. than the building's rehabilitation or renovation, then 
the Applicant may increase allowable floor space by the amount of square footage 
contained in all existing buildings that is replaced or reconstructed."; and 

4) Amend "4. Development Requirements, c. Open Space Protection" by deleting the 
words "thirty (30%) percent" and substituting in lieu thereof "forty (40%) percent"; 

> Renumber existing paragraphs "4." through "9" to "5." through "10."; 

> Add a new paragraph, "4. Building Design Standards", said paragraph to read as 
follows: 

"4. Building Design Standards 

When constructing or renovating buildings in a GEPD, the Applicant is 
encouraged to make the buildings as energy efficient and eco-friendly as possible. 
Guidelines for "green" building construction are available from the Town 
Department of Planning & Development. Applicants are also encouraged to 
choose building designs and materials that are attractive and which complement 
the natural landscape."; 
or to take any other action relative thereto. (Sponsored by: Planning Board) 

Planning Board member David Santomenna moved that the Town vote to amend The 
Protective Zoning Bylaw of the Town of Ipswich as presented in Article 12 of the 
Warrant for the October 18, 2004, Special Town Meeting, with the following changes: 

Under 2), second arrow bullet, revise proposed paragraph "a." by deleting all proposed 
language after the words "except that" and substitute in lieu thereof the following: 
"residential dwellings are allowed only as described in b. below." Seconded. 

34 



Planning Board, Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee recommended 
unanimously. 

On a hand count with 6 against and more than 25 in favor, the Moderator declared the 
motion passed by the required 2/3' s majority vote. 

ARTICLE 13 

To see if the Town will vote to amend the Protective Zoning Bylaw of the Town of 
Ipswich by revising SECTION IX. SPECIAL REGULATIONS, I. Inclusionarv Housing 
Requirements as follows: 

1) Amend "2. Applicability", paragraph "b.", by adding to the second sentence, after 
"Subsection I.", the words "so that the minimum lot size of the new lot is 43,560 square 
feet,"; 

2) Amend "3. Requirements", paragraph "a. (1)", as follows: 

• Revise the 1st sentence by adding, after "at or below 80 percent", the words 
"for for-sale housing and 70% for rental housing"; 

• Revise the 2 nd sentence by replacing "70 percent" with "60 percent", and by 
adding to the end of the sentence the following phrase: ", adjusted for the 
bedroom size of the unit in accordance with the protocols accepted under 
Section 42 of the federal tax code."; 

• Revise the 3 rd sentence by adding, after the words "family of four", the 
following phrase: "adjusted for the bedroom size of the unit,"; and 

• Add, to the last sentence, the following: "; if the fraction is less than one-half 
of a dwelling unit, each tenth of the fraction shall require the payment of the 
unit fee specified in (2) below."; 

3) Amend "4. Conditions of Approval", paragraph "a.", first sentence, by deleting the 
phrase "deemed practicable by the Planning Board, but in no event less than thirty 
years.", and substituting in lieu thereof the phrase "allowed by law, but in no instance less 
than ninety-nine years."; 

4) Amend "5. Off-Site Location" as follows: Revise the 3 rd sentence by deleting the 
words "their construction constitutes a net increase in the number of and substitute in 
lieu thereof "they do not replace any of the"; and revise the 4 th sentence by adding, to the 
end of the sentence, the following phrase: ", and all other requirements of the zoning 
bylaw."; 

or to take any other action relative thereto. (Sponsored by: Planning Board) 

Planning Board member Charles Allen moved that the Town vote to amend The 
Protective Zoning Bylaw of the Town of Ipswich as presented in Article 13 of the 
Warrant for the October 18, 2004, Special Town Meeting. Seconded. 

Planning Board, Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee recommended unanimously 
in favor. 

35 



The voice vote on the motion was inconclusive. On a hand count with 10 against and 
more than 30 in favor, the Moderator declared the motion passed by the required 2/3 's 
majority vote. 

ARTICLE 14 

To see if the Town will vote to amend IX. SPECIAL REGULATIONS of the Protective 
Zoning Bylaw of the Town of Ipswich by adding a new subsection "K. Green Space 
Preservation Development (GSPD) ", said subsection to read as follows: 

"K. Green Space Preservation Development (GSPD) 

The following density standards and development requirements shall apply to a GSPD 
approved by a special permit from the Planning Board in lieu of the zoning provisions 
otherwise applicable in the RRA zoning district. 

1. Purpose 

The purposes of a Green Space Preservation Development (GSPD) are to: 

a. encourage the preservation and appropriate development of the building and 
lands of certain large properties in the RRA District; 

b. encourage the efficient use of such land in harmony with the natural features of 
the RRA District; 

c. protect the rural character and vistas of the Town's main corridor roads; 

d. provide an alternative to the subdivision of an large tract for residences; 

e. preserve open space for conservation or recreation use, and provide appropriate 
public access to said open space; and 

f. protect natural features which are important to the character of the town. 

2. Applicability 

A GSPD may be permitted on a lot which: 

a. has an area of at least twenty-five (25) acres which has remained substantially 
unchanged in lot configuration and size since December 31, 2003. Contiguous 
lots may be combined for inclusion in a GSPD, provided that at least one of the 
lots contains twenty-five (25) acres and has remained substantially unchanged in 
lot configuration and size since December 31, 2003. The calculation of minimum 
lot size shall be done in accordance with paragraph 4.c. below; 

b. contains at least twenty percent (20%) of the lot as forested area (For the 
purposes of this subsection, forested area is defined as a dense growth of trees and 
underbrush.); 

c. contains at least ten (10) acres of contiguous upland; 

d. has at least two hundred and fifty (250) feet of contiguous frontage on one of 
the following collector streets: Essex Road, High Street, or Topsfield Road; 

e. is not owned by the Town or by a non-profit corporation, the principal purpose 
of which is the conservation of open space; 

36 



f. does not satisfy the density standards for a Great Estate Preservation 
Development. 

2. Permitted Uses 

The following uses may be permitted in a GSPD by special permit with site plan approval 
from the Planning Board, as set forth in this subsection: 

a. any use listed in the use schedule as an allowable use in the RRA District, 
whether by special permit or otherwise, except that: 

i. residential dwellings are allowed only as described in b. below; 
ii. a golf course is not permitted in a GSPD 

b. residential dwelling use, provided that: 

i. Residential housing shall be clustered, and no individual house lot 

shall be greater than 20,000 square feet in size; and 

ii. No more than thirty percent of the total allowed residential housing 

shall be detached single-family dwellings; 

iii. At least 10% of the total units are affordable housing as defined in 

IX.I.3.a.(l) of this zoning bylaw. Affordable units constructed off-site 

shall be done so in compliance with IX.I.5. of this zoning bylaw; 

iv. Residential dwelling use shall not exceed twenty-five (25%) percent 

of the maximum floor area which may be developed pursuant to 4. 

below. 

c. hotel, conference center. (For the purposes of this subsection, a conference 
center is defined as a commercial establishment or designated area within a 
commercial establishment providing space for business or professional 
conferences, seminars, training or other meetings and customary hotel functions.); 

d. multi-family dwelling, provided that no more than 50% of the units may 
contain more than two bedrooms, and none of the units shall contain more than 
three bedrooms; 

e. Rest homes, convalescent home, or nursing homes for the elderly or infirm; 

f. Miscellaneous professional and business offices and services; and 

g. retail shops, dining facilities, and similar accessory uses primarily to serve 
occupants, employees or guests. 

h. Research offices or establishments devoted to research and development 
activities; 

3. Density Standards 

a. Floor Area of Development : For the purposes of determining the total new 
floor area which may be developed on the lot, the applicant may construct 
new floor area in the development such that the total resulting floor area does 
not exceed the product of 3,000 square feet times the number of dwelling units 
which could be developed under application of single-family zoning 
requirements under the "Town of Ipswich Rules and Regulations Governing 
the Subdivision of Land" and in accordance with Sections VI. and IX.I. of this 
zoning bylaw. The Applicant shall submit a "Yield Plan" which indicates the 
maximum number of lots achievable under a conventional layout which 



37 



generally complies with the Town of Ipswich Rules and Regulations 
Governing the Subdivision of Land, without altering any land areas in which 
such activity would be precluded by normal application of state and town laws 
and regulations governing wetlands and riverfront areas, or by the existence of 
floodplain areas. In unsewered areas, the Applicant shall provide evidence 
acceptable to the Planning Board that individual on-site wastewater treatment 
and disposal systems may be permitted and constructed to serve all the lots 
proposed under the "Yield Plan" as submitted. This evidence shall include a 
demonstration of suitable soil and groundwater conditions through 
representative sampling and testing of the buildable areas of the site by means 
and methods approved by the Board of Health and shall at maximum ground 
water elevation per two acres of otherwise buildable land, such tests being 
distributed with reasonable uniformity over the site. For the yield plan to be 
approved, all such determinations and observations shall meet the above 
presumption, except that if more than five determinations and observations are 
made, only seventy-five percent of said determinations and observations need 
demonstrate the above presumption. 

b. Additional Floor Space: If a proposed GSPD provides more open space than 
is required by 4.c. of this subsection, then the new floor area to be developed 
on the lot may be increased by fifteen percent (15%) for every five percent 
(5%) of additional satisfactory open space provided. 

c. Maximum Density: The total allowable floor area obtained through the 
application of the formulae described in sub-paragraphs a. and b. above, shall 
not exceed twelve percent (12%) of the area of the lot. 

4. Building Design Standards 

When constructing or renovating buildings in a GSPD, the Applicant is encouraged to 
make the buildings as energy efficient and eco-friendly as possible, and to refer to the 
national standard for developing sustainable buildings, the LEED (Leadership in Energy 
and Environmental Design) Green Building Rating System. Guidelines for "green" 
building construction are available from the Town Department of Planning & 
Development. Applicants are also encouraged to choose building designs and materials 
that are attractive and which complement the natural landscape. 

5. Development Requirements 

a. Town Water: The development shall be served by a water system deemed 
adequate for fire protection and domestic use by the Water Commissioners 
and by the Fire Chief. 

b. Sanitary Sewer/Septic: The development shall be served by the Town's 
sanitary sewer system or by one or more on-site disposal systems conforming 
to the State Environmental Code, Title V and the regulations of the Board of 
Health. If, however, in the judgment of the Board, the topography and/or soil 
conditions are such that it would be more efficient to allow (i) a private central 

38 



sanitary sewer system, notwithstanding the lot's location in a Water Supply 
District, and/or (ii) allow an underground common septic system or individual 
septic systems to be placed in the preserved open space, this configuration 
may be permitted. Prior to making such judgment, the Planning Board shall 
seek the review and recommendations of the Board of Health, Department of 
Utilities, Board of Water Commissioners, and the Conservation Commission. 
If a GSPD is located within a Water Supply District and a private central 
sanitary sewer system is proposed, the Planning Board shall not approve a 
special permit under this subsection unless and until said system shall have 
received a favorable recommendation from the Board of Water 
Commissioners, which recommendation shall not be unreasonably withheld. 
All systems are further subject to approval by the Board of Health and any 
other governmental authority having jurisdiction. 

c. Open Space Restriction: A minimum of fifty (50%) percent of the lot shall 
either be: 

(i) conveyed to the Town of Ipswich and accepted by it for open space 

use; 

(ii) conveyed to the Commonwealth of Massachusetts as part of a state 

forest, park, or wildlife management area; 

(iii) conveyed to a non-profit corporation, the principal purpose of which 

is the conservation of open space, and made subject to a conservation 

restriction prepared in accordance with the provisions of Section 31 and 

33, inclusive, of Chapter 184 of the General Laws of the Commonwealth 

of Massachusetts; 

(iv) made subject to a conservation restriction prepared in accordance 

with the provisions of Section 31 and 33, inclusive, of Chapter 184 of the 

General Laws of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts running in favor of 

either the Town or, upon the approval of the Planning Board, a non-profit 

corporation, the principal purpose of which is the conservation of open 

space. The conservation restriction shall provide that such land shall be 

kept, in perpetuity, in an open or natural state, in accordance with the 

above-noted sections of Chapter 184 of the General Laws. 

In designating the open space, the applicant shall apply the guidelines 
entitled CRITERIA FOR EVALUATING OPEN SPACE , adopted by the 
Planning Board and amended from time to time. At least a portion of the 
open space shall be available for use by the general public, unless the 
applicant can provide compelling reasons to the Planning Board why such 
access would be infeasible. 

d. Dimensional Regulations: 

(i) a minimum setback of one hundred (100) feet of naturally vegetated 
area shall be provided between a GSPD and all street lines and abutting 
lots. The required 100 foot buffer strip shall contain sufficient natural or 
landscape vegetation to effectively screen any development on the site. 



39 



An entry drive, along with appropriate signage, may be permitted within 
the buffer strip. The Planning Board may increase by not more than 
twenty (20%) percent any buffer area requirement if, after site plan review 
by the Board, the Board deems such action to be reasonable and 
appropriate. 

(ii) the area developed for permitted uses, including buildings, parking, 
outdoor recreational structures, and areas paved for vehicular use, shall not 
exceed thirty percent (30%) of the total area of the lot. Walking or bicycle 
trails shall not be counted in the calculation of the (30%) limitation, 
(iii) the development shall be subject to site plan review in accordance 
with the provisions of Section X. of this bylaw, 
(iv) newly constructed buildings in a GSPD shall be setback at least two 
hundred and fifty feet (250) from a public way, and shall be located on the 
portion of the tract that is within the ten acres of contiguous upland (For 
purposes of this section, upland acreage is defined as lot area, not 
including a resource defined by Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 
131, Section 40, as amended.). 

e. Streets and Further Subdivision : Any subdivision of the GSPD which is 
subject to MGL C.41 shall be in accordance with the Rules and Regulations 
Governing the Subdivision of Land in the Town of Ipswich. After issuance of 
a GSPD special permit and site plan approval, and establishment of the 
required open space for the GSPD, as a whole, the GSPD may be subdivided 
into lots which may be less than twenty-five (25) acres and may be held in 
separate ownership, provided that each portion of the subdivided site remains 
subject to all of the applicable terms and conditions of (i) the GSPD special 
permit, and (ii) the site plan approval for the improvements on such portion of 
the site. 

f . Phasing: Phasing of the GSPD, as approved by the Planning Board, shall be 
permitted either pursuant to phasing described in the initial special permit 
application or in subsequent special permit or site plan review applications. 
The special permit and site plan approval shall not be deemed to have lapsed 
so long as the applicant shall have commenced use of the Green Space 
Preservation Development special permit or site plan approval in substantial 
accordance with the phasing time frames set forth in the special permit and 
site plan approval application. The Planning Board shall have the authority to 
require a performance bond or other similar mechanism if it determines that 
such a mechanism is necessary to ensure that the key components of the 
project are satisfactorily completed. 

6. Special Permit Application Process 

All special permit applications for GSPD shall be made and filed on the appropriate 
application form. For an application to be considered complete, it shall provide all 
information required by the Rules and Regulations Governing Granting of Special 

40 



Permits, available from the Department of Planning and Development, and by any 
regulations adopted in accordance with paragraph 10. below. 

The special permit application shall also be accompanied by nine (9) copies of a site 
development report, which shall summarize how the proposed GSPD satisfies the special 
permit criteria being considered by the Planning Board. The site development report 
should include, at minimum, an inventory of natural resource features, wildlife and their 
habitat; a general inventory of all existing buildings, structures and landscape features; a 
detailed description of the proposed components of the GSPD; and an outline of how the 
following issues and impacts will be addressed by the development: (a) pedestrian and 
vehicular access to the site; (b) public safety issues; (c) provision of 
landscaping/buffering; (d) protection of wildlife habitats; (e) provision of utilities; (f) 
open space and recreation; (g) water supply and drainage issues; (h) layout and density of 
site development; (i) the preservation and rehabilitation of any architecturally or 
historically significant buildings on the property; (j) building design and materials, 
including exterior elevations of existing and proposed buildings; and (k) proposed nature 
of the commercial activity. To the extent possible, the information provided in the report 
shall be shown in map form, accompanied by written narrative. 

7. Review Criteria 

In addition to applying the Special Permit general conditions described in XI.J. of this 
zoning bylaw, and the standards, requirements, or conditions set forth in this IX.L, the 
Board shall review the special permit application in accordance with the following 
criterion: the proposed GSPD will, by its design and layout, succeed in (a) preserving 
open space for conservation and/or recreation purposes, and providing appropriate public 
access to the open space; (b) protecting natural features of the land which are important 
to the character of the town, especially the vistas of the main corridor road upon which 
the GSPD takes its frontage; and (c) preserving any historically or architecturally 
significant the buildings, structures, and landscape features of the subject property. 

8. Preliminary Review 

Prior to submitting a special permit application to the Planning Board for a GSPD, the 
applicant is strongly encouraged to submit a preliminary concept plan for review by the 
Planning Board and a Development Review Committee appointed by the Town Manager. 
The preliminary review shall provide an opportunity for the applicant to identify early in 
the process the preferences of the Planning Board and Review Committee relative to the 
development of the site. The Review Committee shall include the chairs of the 
Conservation Commission, Open Space Committee, Bay Circuit Trail Committee, and 
Historical Commission, or their designees; the Directors of the Town Departments of 
Utilities, Code Enforcement, Public Works, Public Safety, and Planning & Development; 
a professional architect; a professional landscape architect; a professional civil engineer; 
and one or more residents from the neighborhood in which the GSPD is proposed. 



41 



The preliminary concept plan should show: (a) the location, height, density, and 
architectural treatment of all buildings proposed for construction or renovation; (b) the 
size, location and proposed use of the open space; (c) the location of all existing and 
proposed parking areas and access roads within and without the GSPD; (d) the type and 
probable location of the proposed utilities; and (e) a delineation of any wetlands or other 
environmentally-sensitive land on the property. 



9. Advisory Opinion 

Within ten days (10) of receipt of a special permit application for a GSPD, the Planning 
Board shall transmit copies of the application to the aforementioned Development 
Review Committee, which shall review the application and submit their 
recommendations to the Planning Board within forty-five (45) days of the referral of the 
application. 

10. Adoption of Rules and Regulations: 

The Board shall adopt an application form and rules and regulations in accordance with 
the provisions of this subsection. Said rules and regulations shall specify the application 
process, type and number of required plans, and general requirements in order to assist 
the developer in complying with the intent of this subsection.; 
or to take any other action relative thereto. (Sponsored by: Planning Board) 

Planning Board member Tim Purinton moved that the Town vote to amend The 
Protective Zoning Bylaw of the Town of Ipswich as follows: 

(1) amend V. USE REGULATIONS as follows: 

amend paragraph A. A pplicability of Use Regulations by deleting from the last 
sentence the word "or" after "paragraph 3", and by adding, after the words "Great 
Estate Preservation Development, paragraph 2" the words "or in K. Green Space 
Preservation Development (GSPD), paragraph 2"; and 

amend D. Table of Use Regulations , within said Table under the heading 
RESIDENTIAL, by adding the use "Great Space Preservation Development" and 
assigning a SPB designation for the RRA District column and a "-" designation 
for the remaining districts; and 

(2) amend IX. SPECIAL REGULATIONS as presented in Article 14 of the Warrant for 
the October 18, 2004, Special Town Meeting, with the following changes: 

Amend "2. Applicability" under "K. Green Space Preservation Development (GSPD) as 
follows: 



42 



Revise "a.", first sentence, by deleting "twenty-five (25) acres" and replacing with 
"thirty (30) acres" and by deleting "December 31, 2003" and replacing with 

"effective date of this bylaw"; amend the second sentence by deleting everything 
after "inclusion in a GSPD," and substituting in lieu thereof the words "provided 
that each lot has frontage on a state-numbered highway, contains at least thirty 
(30) acres and has remained substantially unchanged in lot configuration and size 
since the effective date of this bylaw." 

Revise "d." by deleting the language in its entirety and substituting in lieu thereof 
the following language: "has at least nine hundred (900) feet of contiguous 
frontage on a state-numbered highway;" 



Delete "e." in its entirety; and re-letter "f." to "e." 

Amend "2. Permitted Uses" and each numbered section thereafter, to "3." through "11.", 
respectively; 

Amend "3. Density Standards, a. Floor Area of Development ", fourth sentence, by 
adding , after the words "Board of Health and shall at", the words "a minimum consist of 
one determination of soil permeability and one observation of, 

Amend "3. Density Standards, b. Additional Floor Space ", by deleting fifteen percent 
(15%)" and substituting in lieu thereof "ten percent (10%)"; 

Amend "3. Density Standards, c. Maximum Density ", by deleting "twelve percent 
(12%)" and substituting in lieu thereof "ten percent (10%)"; 

Amend "6. Special Permit Application Process", second paragraph, by deleting from the 
second sentence the words "landscape features" and substituting in lieu thereof the words 
"existing trails; and by deleting (i) in its entirety and re-lettering (j) and (k) accordingly: 

Amend "7. Review Criteria" by adding the word "and" to the end of the phrase under 
(a); and by deleting all language after the words "the GSPD takes its frontage." 
Seconded. 

Planning Board and Board of Selectmen recommended unanimously. Finance 
Committee opposed the motion unanimously. 

After Finance Committee member Jamie Fay and resident Carl Gardner spoke against the 
motion, the Board of Selectmen voted 3 - 2 not to recommend the motion. The Open 
Space Committee supported the article. 

Janice Clements-Skelton moved to indefinitely postpone the motion. Seconded. 

Planning Board, Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee recommended indefinite 



43 



postponement. The Moderator declared the motion for indefinite postponement passed 
by majority voice vote. 

ARTICLE 15 

To see if the Town will vote to amend the Protective Zoning Bylaw of the Town of 
Ipswich as follows: 

(1) amend "IE. DEFINITIONS " as follows: 

• revise the definition of "BUILDING HEIGHT" by deleting the words "the 
roof excluding standpipes, spires, domes, steeples, radio and radar towers, 
chimneys," from the first sentence and substituting in lieu thereof the words 
"a structure or the highest point of a building roof excluding" 

■ revise the definition of "STORY" by adding, after the existing sentence, the 
following sentence: "Basements shall be considered a story if it meets the 
definition of 'story above grade' as defined in the State Building Code."; and 

(2) amend "VI. DIMENSIONAL AND DENSITY REGULATIONS , G. Other General 
Dimensional and Density Requirements" by deleting "2." in its entirety and substituting 
in lieu thereof the following: 

"2. The maximum building height for buildings and structures is three (3) stories, not to 
exceed forty-five (45) feet, with the following exceptions: 

a. Silos, windmills, churches, standpipes, spires, domes, steeples, chimneys, radio 
and radar towers, and similar structures shall have a maximum height of seventy- 
five (75) feet, except that a greater height may be allowed by special permit from 
the Planning Board; 

b. Broadcasting and television antennae, bulkheads, cooling towers, ventilators, 
mechanical systems, and other appurtenances usually carried about the roof and 
not in any manner used for human occupancy may have a height up to 15% 
greater than the applicable height limitation of this section; 

c. The maximum height of a wireless communications facility is established by 
IX.G.3. of this zoning bylaw; 

d. In the RRB District, the maximum building height for principal structures is two 
(2) stories, not to exceed twenty-five (25) feet, and the maximum building height 
for accessory structures shall not exceed eighteen (18) feet; 

e. In the IR, RRA and RRC Districts, the maximum building height is three (3) 
stories, not to exceed thirty-seven (37) feet, except that in the IR District, by 
Planning Board special permit, the height may be increased to no more than 45 
feet; 

44 



f. In the CB District, by Planning Board special permit, the maximum height of 
buildings may be increased beyond forty-five feet in height, except that in no 
instance shall the building contain more than four stories and exceed a height of 
fifty-five feet."; or to take any other action relative thereto. The above changes 
will not be implemented by the Town until the effective date of this bylaw, which 
is the date upon which it is adopted by Town Meeting. (Sponsored by: Planning 
Board) 

Planning Board member Robert Weatherall moved that the Town vote to amend The 
Protective Zoning Bylaw of the Town of Ipswich as presented in Article 15 of the 
Warrant for the October 18, 2004, Special Town Meeting. Seconded. 

Planning Board, Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee recommended in favor 
unanimously. 

Carl Gardner moved that the Town vote to amend The Protective Zoning Bylaw of the 
Town of Ipswich as presented in Article 15 of the Warrant for the October 18, 2004, 
Special Town Meeting, with the following changes: 

Amend part (2) of article as follows: 

s Revise "2.f." by deleting the language in its entirety and substituting in lieu 
thereof the following: "In the CB District, by special permit, the Planning Board 
may allow a four story building, provided that the building height does not exceed 
forty-five feet." Seconded. 

The Planning Board and the Finance Committee voted against the amendment; the Board 
of Selectmen supported the amendment unanimously. On a hand count with 39 against 
and 76 in favor, the Moderator declared the amendment passed. 

Stanley Wood moved a second amendment to Article 15 as follows: 

(2) amend VI DIMENSIONAL AND DENSITY REGULATIONS, G. Other General 
Dimensional and Density Requirements 

Item 2.d. 

Proposed Change in Language 

In the RRB District, the maximum building height for principal structures is two (2) 
stories, not to exceed twenty-five (25) feet, and revise 2.d. to delete the reference to 
building height for accessory structures. Seconded. 

Planning Board and Finance Committee opposed the amendment unanimously; Board of 
Selectmen voted 4-1 against the amendment. 



45 



The Moderator declared the second amendment to the motion failed by majority voice 
vote. 

The Moderator declared the main motion as amended by the first amendment carried by 
the required 2/3 's majority voice vote. 

ARTICLE 16 

To see if the Town will vote to amend the Protective Zoning Bylaw of the Town of 
Ipswich as follows: 

(1) Amend HI. DEFINITIONS by; 

> revising the second sentence of "LOT AREA" by deleting it in its entirety and 
substituting in lieu thereof the following: "For all residential dwellings, except 
for those built on lots created under Section IX. A (OSPZ) of the zoning bylaw, 
not more than thirty percent (30%) of the lot area required for zoning compliance 
shall be a creek, stream, river, pond, lake, estuary or bank, fresh water wetland, 
coastal wetland, beach, dune, flat, marsh, wet meadow or swamp as defined by 
Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 131, Section 40, as amended."; 

> amending the "ACCESSORY IN-LAW APARTMENT" definition by deleting 
"IN-LAW" from "ACCESSORY IN-LAW APARTMENT:" and by deleting the 
current language in its entirety and replace with the following: "A separate 
dwelling unit within a single-family dwelling that is a subordinate part of the 
single-family dwelling and complies with the requirements of EX. J. of this zoning 
bylaw."; 

(2) Amend V. USE SCHEDULE, D. Table of Use Regulations, as follows: 

• within said Table, within the "Single-family detached dwelling" row, under the 
RRA and RRC columns, add the footnote "23."; 

• within said Table under the heading ACCESSORY USE, revise the use "In-law 
apartment" by deleting the words "In-law" and substituting in lieu thereof 

"Accessory"; 

(3) Amend DC. SPECIAL REGULATIONS , J. Accessory In-Law Apartment as 
follows: 

> Revise "1. Purpose and Intent:" by deleting the second sentence and substituting in 
lieu thereof the following: 
"Its purpose is to: 

a. Add moderately-priced rental units to the housing stock to meet 
the needs of small households, both young and old; 



46 



b. Make housing units available to moderate-income households 
who might otherwise have difficulty finding housing in the town; 

c. Provide older homeowners with a means of obtaining rental 
income, companionship, security and services, and thereby to 
enable them to stay more comfortably in homes and 
neighborhoods they might otherwise be forced to leave; 

> Revise "2. Applicability" as follows: 

• Revise the title from "2. Applicability" to "2. Accessory Apartments by Special 
Permit" 

• Delete from the first sentence the words "in-law" and "(see definition in Section 
IH.)" from the first sentence; 

• Delete "a." in its entirety and substitute in lieu thereof the following: 
"a. The apartment will be a complete, separate housekeeping unit that 
functions as a separate unit from the principal dwelling." 

• Add new paragraphs "b., c, d., e., f., and g", said paragraphs to read as 
follows: 

"b. The accessory apartment shall contain not more than one (1) bedroom 
and one (1) bathroom; shall not exceed 900 S.F. of gross floor area or 25% 
of total gross floor area, whichever is greater; and shall be occupied by a 
maximum of two (2) persons 

c. Any new outside entrance to serve an accessory apartment shall be 
located on the side or in the rear of the building. 

d. The apartment shall not be held in, or transferred into separate 
ownership from the principal dwelling under a condominium form of 
ownership, or otherwise. 

e. The lot, and the dwelling units thereon, shall not be used in any way for 
any commercial purpose or activity, regardless of other provisions of this 
bylaw. 

f. At least one parking space is available for use by occupants of the 
Apartment. 

g. In the RRA and RRC Districts, accessory apartments shall not be 
allowed in single-family dwellings located on lots that are nonconforming 
for lack of required lot area, unless said lot is at least 15,000 square feet in 
size. Accessory apartments shall also not be allowed in single-family 
dwellings located on lots developed under Section IX. A. (OSPZ) of the 
zoning bylaw, unless the lot is at least 15,000 square feet in size." 

• Re-letter existing paragraph "b" to "h." and add to it a second sentence, to 
read as follows: "The alterations shall not expand the footprint of the 
building, as it existed on the effective date of this bylaw, by more than 
fifteen percent (15%)" 

• Re-letter existing paragraphs "c." through "h." to "i." through "n.", 
respectively; 

• Revise re-lettered paragraph "1." by deleting all but the first sentence, and by 
deleting from the first sentence the words "run with the owner and not with the 



47 



lot" and substituting in lieu thereof the words "specify that the owner must 
occupy one of the dwelling units."; 

• Revise re-lettered paragraph "n." by deleting the final two sentences, beginning 
with the words "Occupancy permits" and ending in "the Special Permit."; 

• Add paragraphs "o." and "p.", said paragraphs to read as follows: 

"o. Prior to the issuance of a permit, the owner(s) must notify the Building Inspector 
in writing that the owner will occupy one of the dwelling units on the premises as the 
owner's permanent/primary residence, except for bona fide temporary absences, 
p. When a structure which has received a Permit for an accessory apartment is sold, 
the new owner(s), if they wish to continue to exercise the Permit, must within thirty 
(30) day of the sale, submit a sworn and notarized written statement to the Building 
Inspector stating that they will occupy the principal dwelling unit on the premises as 
their primary residence. This statement shall be listed as a condition on any permits 
that are issued under this Section;" and 






> Prior to the last sentence of IX. J., add a new subsection "3. Affordable Accessory 
Apartments", to read as follows: 

"3. Affordable Accessory Apartments 

Accessory apartments that meet all of the requirements described in 2. above, 
as well as the following requirements, are permitted uses pursuant to the Table 
of Use Regulations in VI. of this bylaw: 

a. The accessory units are affordable to households with incomes at or below 
80 percent of the Median Regional Household Income, and provide continued 
affordability, as described and/or required in IX.L, 3. a. and 4.a of this zoning 
bylaw.;" 

b. Alterations necessary to create the accessory apartment shall not involve the 
expansion of the envelope of the existing structure.; 

c. Owners of property containing an accessory unit as described under this 
subsection 3. shall be responsible for annual submission to the Building 
Inspector and the Planning & Development Department of information 
verifying occupancy status and management status of the accessory 
apartment.; 

d. All occupants of an Affordable Accessory Apartment shall, upon initial 
application and annually thereafter, submit necessary documentation to the 
Building Inspector and the Department of Planning & Development, to 
confirm their income. 

e. Rents for Affordable Accessory Apartments shall not exceed the maximum 
permitted under the then current guidelines promulgated by the Massachusetts 
Department of Housing and Community Development Local Initiative 
Program (LIP)."; 

or to take any other action relative thereto. The effective date of this article shall be the 
date of approval by Town Meeting. (Sponsored by: Planning Board) 



48 



Planning Board member Charles Allen moved that the Town vote to amend The 
Protective Zoning Bylaw of the Town of Ipswich as presented in Article 16 of the 
Warrant for the October 18, 2004, Special Town Meeting, with the following changes: 

Amend part (3) of the article by: 

Revising the fifth circle bullet under the second arrow bullet by adding, 
immediately after the words "The alterations shall not expand the footprint", the 
words "or the envelope"; and 

Adding a tenth circular bullet under the second arrow bullet, said new bullet to 
read as follows: 

Add a paragraph "q.", to read as follows: "q. No more than one accessory 
(1) apartment shall be allowed within a single-family dwelling." 

Deleting, in its entirety, the language after the third arrow bullet creating a new 
"Affordable Accessory Apartments" subsection. Seconded. 

Planning Board and Board of Selectmen recommended in favor unanimously. Finance 
Committee voted 4-2 in favor. The Moderator declared the motion carried by the 
required 2/3 's majority voice vote. 

ARTICLE 17 

To see if the Town will vote to amend "IX. SPECIAL REGULATIONS , A. Open Space 
Preservation (Cluster) Zoning (OSPZ)" of the Protective Zoning Bylaw of the Town of 
Ipswich as follows: 

1) Amend "2. Applicability", first sentence, by deleting the words "more than six" and 
substituting in lieu thereof "six or more"; and 

2) Amend "4. Density Standards", as follows: 

> Revise paragraph "a.", second sentence, by adding, after the words 
"conventional layout", the phrase "which generally complies with the Town 
of Ipswich Rules and Regulations Governing the Subdivision of Land,'" and 
by deleting from the sentence the phrase "or steep (over 25%) slopes." 

> Revise paragraph "b.", first sentence, by deleting, after the phrase "may be 
considered", the words "in the lot area calculations", and substitute in lieu 
thereof the words "when calculating the total area of the tract"; 

> Revise "c. Maximum Density" as follows: 

■ Add, to the end of the first sentence, the following phrase: ", except as 
described below." 



49 



■ Add, to the last sentence of the paragraph, the following: 
", except as follows: 

(1) The Applicant submits an OSPZ application in accordance with the 
provisions of IX.I. Inclusionary Housing Requirements; 

(2) An OSPZ application submitted in accordance with the provisions of 
IX.I may be allowed an increase over the overall density that is achievable 
under said Section, subject to the following conditions and limitations: 

i. An OSPZ application which provides an open space set aside of 
greater than the required 50% may be entitled to a density bonus, 
under the general rule that at least 10% of additional satisfactory 
open space be provided in order to receive a bonus that is 
equivalent to an additional house lot. In no instance shall a density 
bonus awarded under subparagraph i. exceed 125% of the 
achievable density under IX.I. 

ii. An OSPZ application which provides greater affordability than 
that required under IX.I may be entitled to a density bonus, under 
the general rule that at least 150% of the required affordability be 
provided in order to receive a bonus that is equivalent to three 
additional house lots. In no instance shall a density bonus awarded 
under this subparagraph ii. exceed 125% of the achievable density 
under IX.I. 

iii. In no instance shall the overall density be more than two times 
what can be achieved under conventional two-acre zoning."; 

3) Amend "5. Development Requirements, e. Application and Review Process:", 3 rd 
paragraph, as follows: 

• add, at the beginning of the paragraph, the following sentence: "Within 
ten days of receipt of a concept plan and/or special permit application, the 
Planning Board shall transmit a copy of the plan and/or application and to 
the Open Space Committee, which shall review the application and submit 
its recommendation to the Planning Board within thirty (30) days of the 
referral of the application." 

• Delete the second sentence in its entirety.; 

or to take any other action relative thereto. (Sponsored by: Planning Board) 

Planning Board member Tim Purinton moved that the Town vote to amend The 
Protective Zoning Bylaw of the Town of Ipswich as presented in Article 17 of the 
Warrant for the October 18, 2004, Special Town Meeting. Seconded. 

Planning Board, Finance Committee and Board of Selectmen recommended in favor 
unanimously. Motion carried by unanimous voice vote. 



50 



ARTICLE 18 

To see if the Town will vote to: 

(1) amend the Protective Zoning Bylaw of the Town of Ipswich by: 

> amending "EL DEFINITIONS" as follows: 

• revise the definition of "PRIVATE GUEST HOUSE" by deleting the 
words "kitchen or"; 

• add the definition of "COOKING FACILITIES", to read as follows: 

"COOKING FACILITIES: Any facilities, including without limitation a 
hot plate or portable oven, which permit the occupant of a building to 
prepare or serve hot meals in the building on a regular basis." 

> amending "V. USE REGULATIONS " as follows: 

• Revise D. Table of Use Regulations by: 

□ adding the footnote "16" to the "GB", "CB", "HB", and "I" 
headings; 

□ adding, within the "Multi-family dwelling" row, the footnote "23" 
to "SPB" under the "IR" column; 

a changing, for the use "Establishment for repair and/or service of 
new and/or used automobiles. . .", under the IR column, "SPB" to 

u >». 

J 

□ adding, to the use "Assisted Living or Life Care Facility", under 
the "Principal Use" heading, footnote "25."; and 

• Revise "FOOTNOTES TO USE REGULATIONS" as follows: 

□ Modify footnote "16." by adding, after "Planned Commercial," the 
words "General Business, Central"; 

□ modify footnote "23." by deleting from "(a)" the words "or two- 
family" and substituting in lieu thereof the words ", two-family or 
three family", and by adding to "(b)", after "effective date of this 
amendment", the words "and not substantially altered subsequent 
to the effective date,"; 

□ Add a new footnote, "25.", said footnote to read as follows: 

"25. Dimensional and design standards for Assisted Living or Life 
Care Facilities will vary according to the zoning district within 
which the facility is located, and will be determined by the 
Planning Board during the special permit process. For guidance 
prior to submittal, Applicants should review "Guidelines for Senior 
Housing in Ipswich, available from the Town Department of 
Planning & Development."; and 

> amending "VI. DIMENSIONAL AND DENSITY REGULATIONS "as follows: 



51 



• 



• 



• 



Revise "B. Table of Dimensional and Density Regulations as follows: 

□ Within the "Rural Residence (RRA & RRC) and "Intown 
Residence" rows, under the "Use" column, add footnote "3 1 ." to 
the use "Two-family"; 

□ Under the heading "Accessory Buildings" within the "Intown 
Residence" row, under the "Side and Rear Minimum Setback" 
columns, delete the footnote "27.", 

Revise "E. Screening Requirements", third sentence, by deleting ", 
Neartown"; 

Revise "F. Requirements for Accessory Buildings and Structures" by 
adding, after the second sentence, the following sentence: "Accessory 
buildings and structures are prohibited from having attached decks 
unless the accessory building or structure is used for habitation, and 
provided that the deck is no more than sixty-four (64) square feet in 
size and open to the sky." 

Revise "G. Other General Dimensional and Density Requirements as 
follows: 

□ Modify "4. by deleting ", NR," and by deleting "RRA/RRB" and 
substituting in lieu thereof "RRA/RRB/RRC" 

q Modify "5." by adding, after the first sentence, the following 
sentence: "The designation of the frontage street is subject to the 
approval of the Building Inspector."; and 

• Revise "FOOTNOTES TO TABLE OF DIMENSIONAL AND 
DENSITY REGULATIONS as follows: 

□ modify footnote "2." by adding to the end of the sentence the 
phrase: ", and the front setback requirement up to a maximum of 
10%."; and 

□ add a new footnote "3 1 .", said footnote to read as follows: 

"31. Two-family buildings proposed on lots that are exempt from 
the dimensional requirements of this table pursuant to Chapter 
40A, Section 6 may be allowed only by special permit from the 
Zoning Board of Appeals."; 

(2) amend the Official Zoning Map of the Town of Ipswich by rezoning to RRA the 
portion of 326 High Street, further identified as Parcel 3 A on Assessor's Map 12, that is 
zoned HB, as shown on the attached map; or take any other action relative thereto. 
(Sponsored by: Planning Board) 

Planning Board member David Santomenna moved that the Town vote to amend the 



52 



Protective Zoning Bylaw of the Town of Ipswich and the Official Zoning Map as 
presented in Article 18 of the Warrant for the October 18, 2004, Special Town Meeting, 
with the following changes: Amend part (1) as follows: 

Amend the second arrow bullet by deleting in its entirety the fourth square bullet under 
the first circular bullet, said bullet beginning with the words "adding, to the use 
"Assisted..." 

Amend the second arrow bullet by revising the second square bullet under the second 
circular bullet as follows: delete all language after "or three family'" and substitute in 
lieu thereof the following: "and by deleting from '(b)' the word 'amendment' and by 
adding to '(b)', after 'effective date of this', the words 'footnote, and not substantially 
altered subsequent to the effective date'"; 

Amend the second arrow bullet by deleting in its entirety the third square bullet under the 
second circular bullet, said bullet beginning with the words "Add a new footnote, '25.'". 

Amend the third arrow bullet by deleting in its entirety the second square bullet under the 
fifth circular bullet, said bullet beginning with the words "add a new footnote '31.'". 
Seconded. 

Planning Board, Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee recommended in favor 
unanimously. Motion carried by unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 19 

To see if the Town will vote to amend the Protective Zoning Bylaw of the Town of 
Ipswich by amending " VII. OFF-STREET PARKING AND LOADING 
REGULATIONS " as follows: 

1) Revise "J. Loading Requirements, TABLE OF LOADING REQUIREMENTS", by 
applying the asterisk that is currently applied only to the use "Residential Multi-family" 
to all of the uses in the Table; 

2) Revise "K. Design Standards for Parking Facilities" as follows: 

> Revise the dimensional table as follows: 

• Delete the number in each of the rows under the Stall Depth column 
and replace with "18'-0" for all rows except the first, which shall be 
"22"'; 

• Delete the number in each of the final three rows under the "Aisle 
Width, 1-way" column and replace with "18'-0", "19'-0", "20'-0", 
respectively; 

• Delete the number in the first and last row under the "Aisle Width, 2- 
way" column and replace with "20'-0", "24'-0", respectively; 



53 



> Immediately after the dimensional table, add the following sentence: 

"For parking facilities developed in conjunction with a 
development requiring site plan approval or a special permit, the 
Planning Board by special permit may reduce the above required 
dimensions up to a maximum of twenty-five percent (25%), based 
on a determination that the special circumstances of the 
development permit a lesser standard than otherwise required. The 
Planning Board may also allow, by special permit, small car 
parking spaces (8 feet by 16 feet) to be substituted for up to fifty 
percent of the standard parking spaces. Compact parking spaces 
shall be designated by clearly visible signs."; and 

3) Revise "P. Landscaping" as follows: 

> add, after the first sentence, the following sentences: 

"Said landscaping shall include the establishment of vegetative or 
structural screens on the perimeter of all parking areas to prevent 
direct views of parked vehicles from streets and sidewalks, avoid 
spillover light, glare, noise, or exhaust fumes onto adjacent properties, 
and to provide the parking area with a reasonable measure of shade 
when trees reach maturity. Vegetative or structural buffers shall be no 
less than five (5) feet high. Buffers may be a hedge, wall, fence, berm 
or combination of these choices. The height of any screen shall 
decrease where driveways approach sidewalks, walking paths, and 
streets in order to provide adequate visibility of pedestrians from 
motor vehicles and to maintain a clear line of sight for vehicles 
entering the roadway."; and 

> revise the last sentence by deleting the words "Board, as applicable", and 
substituting in lieu thereof "Planning Board, for all projects which require 
Site Plan Review approval or a Planning Board Special Permit"; 

or to take any other action relative thereto. (Sponsored by: Planning Board) 

Planning Board member Michael Ryan moved that the Town vote to amend The 
Protective Zoning Bylaw of the Town of Ipswich as presented in Article 19 of the 
Warrant for the October 18, 2004, Special Town Meeting, with the following changes: 

Amend part 2) of the article as follows: 

Under the first arrow bullet, within the language after the first circular bullet, 
delete "be '22'" and substitute in lieu thereof "remain N/A"; 

Under the second arrow bullet, revise the second sentence of the language in 
quotations by striking the words "fifty percent" and substituting in lieu thereof 



54 



"thirty percent"; 

Amend part 3) of the article by modifying the first arrow bullet as follows: 

Revise the first sentence of the language in quotations by deleting the word 
"screens" and replacing with "buffers"; 

Revise the fourth sentence by deleting the word "screen" and replacing with 
"buffer". Seconded: 

Planning Board, Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee recommended in favor 
unanimously. Motion carried by unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 20 

To see if the Town will vote to establish an Agricultural Commission to represent the 
Ipswich farming community. Said Commission shall serve as facilitator for encouraging 
the pursuit of agriculture in Ipswich, shall promote agricultural-based economic 
opportunities in Town, shall act as mediator, advocate, and/or educator on farming issues, 
and shall pursue all initiatives appropriate to creating a sustainable agricultural 
community in Ipswich. 

The Commission shall consist of seven members from the active farming and agriculture 
community in Ipswich, to be appointed by the Board of Selectmen - three members for a 
term of three years; two members for a term of two years, and three thereafter; and two 
members for a one-year term, and three thereafter. Up to five alternates may also be 
appointed by the Board of Selectmen, each for one-year terms; and/or take any other 
action relative thereto. The appointing authority shall fill a vacancy based on the 
unexpired term of the vacancy in order to maintain the cycle of appointments; or to take 
any other action relative thereto. (Sponsored by Department of Planning and 
Development) 

Selectman Edward Rauscher moved to indefinitely postpone action on this article. 

Seconded. 

Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee and Planning Board recommended unanimously 

in favor of indefinite postponement. Motion carried by unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 21 

To see if the Town will vote to extend the tenure of the Community Development Plan 
Implementation Task Force, established by the Fall 2003 Town Meeting, for one year, 
with the stipulation that said task force shall report its findings to the Special Town 
Meeting in Fall 2005; or to take any other action relative thereto. (Sponsored by: 
Planning Board) 

Planning Board member Robert Weatherall moved that the Town vote to extend the 



55 



tenure of the Community Development Plan Implementation Task Force, established by 
the Fall 2003 Town Meeting, for one year, with the stipulation that said task force shall 
report its findings to the Special Town Meeting in Fall 2005. Seconded. 

Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee and Planning Board recommended unanimously 
in favor of the motion. Motion carried by unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 22 

To see if the Town of Ipswich will vote to amend the General Bylaws of the Town of 
Ipswich by: 

(1) adding "Chapter XIX. Stormwater Management", said chapter to read as follows: 
"CHAPTER XIX. STORMWATER MANAGEMENT 

Section 1. Illicit Connections and Discharges to the Storm Drain System 

(a) Purpose 

Increased and contaminated stormwater runoff is a major cause of: 

(1) impairment of water quality and flow in lakes, ponds, streams, rivers, 
wetlands and groundwater; 

(2) contamination of drinking water supplies; 

(3) contamination of clam flats and other coastal areas; 

(4) alteration or destruction of aquatic and wildlife habitat; and 

(5) flooding. 

Regulation of illicit connections and discharges to the municipal storm drain 
system is necessary for the protection of the Town of Ipswich's (hereafter "the 
Town") water bodies and groundwater, and to safeguard the public health, safety, 
welfare and the environment. 

(b) The objectives of this bylaw are: 

(1) to prevent pollutants from entering the Town's municipal separate storm 
sewer system (MS4); 

(2) to prohibit illicit connections and unauthorized discharges to the MS4; 

(3) to require the removal of all such illicit connections; 

(4) to comply with state and federal statutes and regulations relating to 
stormwater discharges; 

(5) to establish the legal authority to ensure compliance with the provisions of 
this bylaw through inspection, monitoring, and enforcement; and 

(6) to prevent contamination of drinking water supplies. 

(c) Definitions 

For the purposes of this bylaw, the following shall mean: 

(1) Best Management Practice (BMP). An activity, procedure, restraint, or 
structural improvement that helps to reduce the quantity or improve the 
quality of stormwater runoff. 

(2) Clean Water Act. The Federal Water Pollution Control Act (33 U.S.C. § 
1251 et seq.) as hereafter amended. 



56 












(3) Discharge of Pollutants, The addition from any source of any pollutant or 
combination of pollutants into the municipal storm drain system or into 
the waters of the United States or Commonwealth from any source. 

(4) Groundwater. Water beneath the surface of the ground. 

(5) Illicit Connection. A surface or subsurface drain or conveyance, which 
allows an illicit discharge into the municipal storm drain system, including 
without limitation sewage, process wastewater, or wash water and any 
connections from indoor drains, sinks, or toilets, regardless of whether 
said connection was previously allowed, permitted, or approved before the 
effective date of this bylaw. 

(6) Illicit Discharge. Direct or indirect discharge to the municipal storm drain 
system that is not composed entirely of stormwater, except as exempted in 
Section 8. The term does not include a discharge in compliance with an 
NPDES Storm Water Discharge Permit or a Surface Water Discharge 
Permit, or resulting from fire fighting activities. 

(7) Impervious Surface. Any material or structure on or above the ground that 
prevents water infiltrating the underlying soil. Impervious surface includes 
without limitation roads, paved parking lots, sidewalks, and rooftops. 

(8) Municipal Separate Storm Sewer System (MS4) or Municipal Storm Drain 
System. The system of conveyances designed or used for collecting or 
conveying stormwater, including any road with a drainage system, street, 
gutter, curb, inlet, piped storm drain, pumping facility, retention or 
detention basin, natural or man-made or altered drainage channel, 
reservoir, and other drainage structure that together comprise the storm 
drainage system owned or operated by the Town of Ipswich. 

(9) National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Storm Water 
Discharge Permit. A permit issued by United States Environmental 
Protection Agency or jointly with the State that authorizes the discharge of 
pollutants to waters of the United States. 

(10) Non-Stormwater Discharge. Discharge to the municipal storm drain 
system not composed entirely of stormwater. 

(11) Person. An individual, partnership, association, firm, company, trust, 
corporation, agency, authority, department or political subdivision of the 
Commonwealth or the federal government, to the extent permitted by law, 
and any officer, employee, or agent of such person. 

(12) Pollutant. Any element or property of sewage, agricultural, industrial or 
commercial waste, runoff, leachate, heated effluent, or other matter 
whether originating at a point or nonpoint source, that is or may be 
introduced into any sewage treatment works or waters of the 
Commonwealth. Pollutants shall include without limitation: 

(a) paints, varnishes, and solvents; 

(b) oil and other automotive fluids; 

(c) non-hazardous liquid and solid wastes and yard wastes; 

(d) refuse, rubbish, garbage, litter, or other discarded or abandoned 
objects, ordnances, accumulations and floatables; 

(e) pesticides, herbicides, and fertilizers; 



57 



(f) hazardous materials and wastes; sewage, fecal coliform and 
pathogens; 

(g) dissolved and particulate metals; 
(h) metal objects or materials; 

(i) animal wastes; 

(j) rock, sand, salt, soils, or other products/material that mobilize in 

surface water runoff; 
(k) construction wastes and residues; and 
(1) noxious or offensive matter of any kind. 

(13) Process Wastewater. Water which, during manufacturing or processing, 
comes into direct contact with or results from the production or use of any 
material, intermediate product, finished product, or waste product. 

(14) Recharge. The process by which groundwater is replenished by 
precipitation through the percolation of runoff and surface water through 
the soil. 

(15) Stormwater. Storm water runoff, snow melt runoff, and surface water 
runoff and drainage. 

(16) Stormwater Pollution Prevention Plan. A document which describes the 
Best Management Practices and activities to be implemented by a person 
or business to identify sources of pollution or contamination at a site and 
the actions to eliminate or reduce pollutant discharges to stormwater, 
stormwater conveyance systems, and/or receiving waters to the maximum 
extent practicable. 

(17) Surface Water Discharge Permit. A permit issued by the Department of 
Environmental Protection (DEP) pursuant to 314 CMR 3.00 that 
authorizes the discharge of pollutants to waters of the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts. 

(18) Toxic or Hazardous Material or Waste. Any material, which because of 
its quantity, concentration, chemical, corrosive, flammable, reactive, toxic, 
infectious or radioactive characteristics, either separately or in 
combination with any substance or substances, constitutes a present or 
potential threat to human health, safety, welfare, or to the environment. 
Toxic or hazardous materials include, but are not limited to: 

(a) any synthetic organic chemical; 

(b) petroleum products; 

(c) heavy metals; 

(d) radioactive or infectious waste; 

(e) acid and alkali substances; 

(f) any substance defined as Toxic or Hazardous under G.L. Ch.21C 
and Ch.21E, and the regulations at 310 CMR 30.000 and 310 CMR 
40.0000; and 

(g) any substance listed as hazardous under 40 CFR 261. 

(19) Watercourse. A natural or man-made channel through which water flows 
or a stream of water, including a river, brook or underground stream. 

(20) Waters of the Commonwealth. All waters within the jurisdiction of the 
Commonwealth, including, without limitation, rivers, streams, lakes, 

58 



ponds, springs, impoundments, estuaries, wetlands, costal waters, and 
groundwater. 
(21) Wastewater. Any sanitary waste, sludge, or septic tank or cesspool 

overflow, and water that during manufacturing, cleaning or processing, 
comes into direct contact with or results from the production or use of any 
raw material, intermediate product, finished product, byproduct or waste 
product. 

(c) Applicability 

This bylaw shall apply to flows entering the municipally-owned storm drainage 
system. 

(d) Authority 

This bylaw is adopted under the authority granted by the Home Rule Amendment 
of the Massachusetts Constitution and the Home Rule Procedures Act, and 
pursuant to the regulations of the federal Clean Water Act found at 40 CFR 
122.34. 

(e) Responsibility for Administration 

The Town of Ipswich Department of Public Works (DPW) shall administer, 
implement and enforce this bylaw. Any powers granted to or duties imposed upon 
the DPW may be delegated in writing by the DPW to its employees or agents. 

(f) Regulations 

The DPW may promulgate rules and regulations to effectuate the purposes of this 
bylaw. Failure by the DPW to promulgate such rules and regulations shall not 
have the effect of suspending or invalidating this bylaw. 

(g) Prohibited Activities 

(1) Illicit Discharges. No person shall dump, discharge, cause or allow to be 

discharged any pollutant or non-stormwater discharge into the municipal 
separate storm sewer system (MS4), into a watercourse, or into the waters 
of the Commonwealth. 

(2) Illicit Connections. No person shall construct, use, allow, maintain or continue 

any illicit connection to the municipal storm drain system, regardless of 
whether the connection was permissible under applicable law, regulation 
or custom at the time of connection. 

(3) Obstruction of Municipal Storm Drain System. No person shall obstruct or 

interfere with the normal flow of stormwater into or out of the municipal 
storm drain system without prior written approval from the DPW. 
(h) Exemptions 

Any discharges associated with municipal fire fighting activities are exempt from 
the discharge prohibitions established by this bylaw. In addition, the following 
non-stormwater discharges or flows are exempt from the discharge prohibitions of 
this bylaw, provided that the source is not a significant contributor of a pollutant 
to the municipal storm drain system: 

(1) water line flushing; 

(2) flow from potable water sources; 

(3) discharge from landscape irrigation or lawn watering; 

(4) diverted stream flow; 

(5) rising groundwater; 



59 



(6) uncontaminated groundwater infiltrating as defined in 40 CFR 
35.2005(20), or uncontaminated pumped groundwater; 

(7) water from exterior foundation drains, footing drains (not including active 
groundwater dewatering systems), crawl space pumps, or air conditioning 
condensation; 

(8) springs; 

(9) water from individual residential car washing; 

(10) natural riparian habitat or wetland flows; 

(11) discharge from dechlorinated swimming pool water (less than one ppm 
chlorine) provided the water is allowed to stand for one week prior to 
draining and the pool is drained in such a way as not to cause a nuisance; 

(12) discharge from street sweeping; 

(13) dye testing, provided verbal notification is given to the DPW prior to the 
time of the test; 

(14) nonstormwater discharge permitted under an NPDES permit, waiver, or 
waste discharge order administered under the authority of the United 
States Environmental Protection Agency, provided that the discharge is in 
full compliance with the requirements of the permit, waiver, or order and 
applicable laws and regulations; 

(15) any discharge for which advanced written approval is received from the 
DPW as necessary to protect public health, safety, welfare, and the 
environment; and 

(16) any other water source not containing Pollutants. 

(i) Suspension Due to Illicit Discharges in Emergency Situations 

The DPW may suspend municipal storm drain system access to any person or 
property without prior written notice when such suspension is necessary to stop an 
actual or threatened discharge of Pollutants that presents imminent risk of harm to 
the public health, safety, welfare or the environment. In the event any person fails 
to comply with an emergency suspension order, the DPW, its employees and 
agents may take all reasonable steps to prevent or minimize harm to the public 
health, safety, welfare or the environment. 

(j) Suspension Due to the Detection of Illicit Discharge(s) 

Any person discharging to the MS4 in violation of this bylaw maj have their MS4 
access terminated if such termination would abate or reduce an illicit discharge. 
The authorized enforcement agency will notify a violator of the proposed 
termination of its MS4 access. The violator may petition the DPW for a 
reconsideration and hearing. A person commits an offense if the person reinstates 
MS4 access to premises terminated pursuant to this Section, without the prior 
approval of the DPW. 

(k) Requirements to Prevent, Control, and Reduce Storm Water Pollutants by the Use 
of Best Management Practices 

As required by the final NPDES General Permit, the DPW will adopt 
requirements for post-construction stormwater runoff controls for new 
development and redevelopment projects that disturb greater than one acre. These 
controls, in the form of Best Management Practices, shall prevent or minimize 
impacts to water quality and comply with Massachusetts Surface Water Quality 



60 



Standards and the DEP Stormwater Management Policy. Consideration of 
controls should include, but need not be limited to, a list of preferred structural 
BMPs to be created by the DPW as guidance for developers or homeowners. 
Further, any person responsible for a property or premise, which is, or may be, the 
source of an illicit discharge, may be required to implement, at said person's 
expense, additional structural and non-structural BMPs to prevent the further 
discharge of pollutants to the municipal separate storm sewer system. Compliance 
with all terms and conditions of a valid NPDES permit authorizing the discharge 
of storm water associated with industrial activity, to the extent practicable, shall 
be deemed compliance with the provisions of this section. These BMPs shall be 
part of a stormwater pollution prevention plan (SWPP) as necessary for 
compliance with requirements of the NPDES permit. 
(1) Notification of Spills 

Notwithstanding other requirements of local, state or federal law, as soon as a 
person responsible for a facility or operation, or responsible for emergency 
response for a facility or operation has information of or suspects a release of 
materials at that facility or operation resulting in or which may result in discharge 
of pollutants to the municipal drainage system or waters of the Commonwealth, 
the person shall take all necessary steps to ensure containment and cleanup of the 
release. In the event of a release of oil or hazardous materials, the person shall 
immediately notify the municipal fire and police DPWs. In the event of a release 
of non-hazardous material, the reporting person shall notify the DPW no later 
than the next business day. The reporting person shall provide to the DPW written 
confirmation of all telephone, facsimile or in-person notifications within three 
business days thereafter. If the discharge of prohibited materials is from a 
commercial or industrial facility, the facility owner or operator of the facility shall 
retain on-site a written record of the discharge and the actions taken to prevent its 
recurrence. Such records shall be retained for at least three years. 

(m) Enforcement 

The DPW or an authorized agent shall enforce this bylaw, regulations, orders, 
violation notices, and enforcement orders, and may pursue all civil and criminal 
remedies for such violations. 

(1) Civil Relief. If a person violates the provisions of this bylaw, regulations, 
permit, notice, or order issued thereunder, the DPW may seek injunctive 
relief in a court of competent jurisdiction restraining the person from 
activities which would create further violations or compelling the person 
to perform abatement or remediation of the violation. 

(2) Orders. The DPW or an authorized agent may issue a written order to 
enforce the provisions of this bylaw or the regulations thereunder, which 
may include: 

(a) elimination of illicit connections or discharges to the MS4; 

(b) performance of monitoring, analyses, and reporting; 

(c) that unlawful discharges, practices, or operations shall cease and 
desist; and 



61 



(d) the abatement and remediation of stormwater pollution or 
contamination hazards, and restoration of any affected property. 

If the enforcing person determines that abatement or remediation of 
contamination is required and is the responsibility of the property owner and/or 
violator, the order shall set forth a deadline by which such abatement or 
remediation must be completed. Said order shall further advise that, should the 
violator or property owner fail to abate or perform remediation within the 
specified deadline, the Town may, at its option, undertake such work, and 
expenses times three thereof shall be charged to the violator. 

Within thirty (30) days after completing all measures necessary to abate the 
violation or to perform remediation, the violator and the property owner will be 
notified of the costs incurred by the Town, including administrative costs. The 
violator or property owner may file a written protest objecting to the amount or 
basis of costs with the DPW within thirty (30) days of receipt of the notification 
of the costs incurred. If the amount due is not received by the expiration of the 
time in which to file a protest or within thirty (30) days following a decision of 
the DPW affirming or reducing the costs, or from a final decision of a court of 
competent jurisdiction, the costs shall become a special assessment against the 
property owner and shall constitute a lien on the owner's property for the amount 
of said costs. Interest shall begin to accrue on any unpaid costs at the statutory 
rate provided in G.L. Ch. 59, §57 after the thirty-first day at which the costs first 
become due. 

(3) Criminal Penalty. Any person who violates any provision of this bylaw, 
regulation, order, or permit issued thereunder, shall be punished by a fine 
of not more than $200. Each day or part thereof that such violation occurs 
or continues shall constitute a separate offense. 

(4) Non-Criminal Disposition. As an alternative to criminal prosecution or 
civil action, the Town may elect to utilize the non-criminal disposition 
procedure set forth in G.L. Ch. 40, §21D and Ch. 17, §4, Subsection B of 
the General Bylaws of the Town of Ipswich. The penalty for the 1st 
violation shall be $50. The penalty for the 2nd violation shall be $100. The 
penalty for the 3rd and subsequent violations shall be $200. Each day or 
part thereof that such violation occurs or continues shall constitute a 
separate offense. 

(5) Entry to Perform Duties Under this Bylaw. The DPW, its agents, officers, 
and employees may enter upon privately owned property for the purpose 
of performing their duties under this bylaw and regulations and may make 
or cause to be made such examinations, surveys or sampling as the DPW 
deems reasonably necessary. 

(6) Appeals. The decisions or orders of the DPW shall be final. Further relief 
shall be to a court of competent jurisdiction. 

(7) Remedies Not Exclusive. The remedies listed in this bylaw are not 
exclusive of any other remedies available under any applicable federal, 
state or local law. 



62 



(n) Severability 

The provisions of this bylaw are hereby declared to be severable. If any provision, 
paragraph, sentence, or clause, of this bylaw or the application thereof to any 
person, establishment, or circumstances shall be held invalid, such invalidity shall 
not affect the other provisions or application of this bylaw. 

(o) Transitional Provisions 

Residential property owners comply with this bylaw on a schedule set forth in the 
DPW of Public Works compliance order, but such property owners shall in no 
case have more than six months from the effective date of the bylaw to comply 
with its provisions, unless good cause is shown for the failure to comply with the 
bylaw during that period."; and 

(2) amending "CHAPTER XVII, Section 4., Subsection B." by adding, to the end of the 
subsection, the following: 

"Chapter XIX. Stormwater Management (Department of Public Works) 

1. Illicit Connections and Discharges to the Storm Drain System 

a. First offense 50.00 

b. Second offense 100.00 

c. Third and subsequent offense 200.00"; 
or to take any other action relevant thereto. 

Selectman James Foley moved to indefinitely postpone action on this article. Seconded. 

Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee and Planning Board recommended unanimously 
in favor of indefinite postponement. Motion carried by unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 23 

To see if the Town will transfer the care, control and custody of the following listed 
properties, from their indicated current custodians to the listed proposed custodians: 



Property Address Map Lot Acres Current Custodian 



65 South Main 
4 Tansy Lane 
310 Argilla 

125 Little Neck 
Rd 

12 Turkey Shore 
32 Turkey Shore 
124 County Rd 
29 Estes Street 
8 Wildes Ct 
3 Wildes Ct 
14 Hammatt St 



42A 186A 0.22 General Municipal/T.M. 

42B 2 0.21 General MunicipalAT.M. 

34 1 27.5 General Municipal 

24C 175 1.3 General Municipal 



42A 
42A 
54A 
42C 
42A 
42A 
42A 



44 
53 
20C 
49 

225A 

228 

235 



0.17 
0.44 
2.97 
1.47 
0.01 
0.19 
0.17 



General 
General 
General 
General 
General 
General 
General 



Municipal 
Municipal 
Municipal 
Municipal 
Municipal 
Municipal 
Municipal 



Proposed 

Custodian 

DPW 

Cemetery&Pks 

Cemetery&Pks 

Cemetery&Pks 

Cemetery&Pks 

Cemetery&Pks 

Cemetery&Pks 

DPW 

DPW 

DPW 

DPW 



63 



HammattSt 41B 298A 0.3 

10 Wildes Ct 42A 226 0.39 

LinebrookRd 27D 4A 1.87 

Island Park Rd 23C 46 0.17 

North Ridge Rd 15A 8 0.44 

15 Water St 42A 85 0.15 

Lords Creek 2 2 10.6 

Marsh Holy Island 2 7 9.2 

Roger Island River 2 5 66.9 

Marsh Hundreds 6 10 22.8 

Rowley River 6 6 4.3 

Roger Island River 7 11 4.6 

Roger Island River 7 14 5.8 

Roger Island River 7 7 51.4 

Roger Island River 7 8 10.3 

Stacy Creek 7 15 40 

Plum Island Sound 8 2 7.6 

109 Town Farm 13 34 0.6 

Marsh Hundreds 13 3.5 

Muddy River Run 13 6 1.6 

Muddy River Run 13 7 0.3 

Muddy River Run 13 8 9.4 

Bagwell Island 14 12 15.2 

Cross Banks 14 13 15.3 

Marsh Hundreds 14 11 12.7 

Marsh Hundreds 14 15 3.5 

Marsh Hundreds 14 16 132.2 

Paine Creek 14 7A 1.8 

107 Rear Town 21 73 1.6 
Farm 

Rear Town Farm 21 40 6 

27 Greens Point 22 15 28.2 

41 Greens Point 22 1 102.2 

Marsh Island 32 8 1.4 

Marsh Island 32 9 11.3 

11 Rear Fox Run 40 56 6.31 

Rear Intervale Wy 52 16 10.3 

RearArgillaRd 64 10 3.4 

Cross Banks 15A 18 18.1 

45 Little Neck Rd 23A 14 17.5 

Toll Bridge Ln 23C 43 2.8 

Marsh 23D 54 2.3 

Marsh 23D 57 1.4 

Rear Town Farm 13 9 2.8 



General 
General 
General 
General 
General 
General 
General 
General 
General 
General 
General 
General 
General 
General 
General 
General 
General 
General 
General 
General 
General 
General 
General 
General 
General 
General 
General 
General 
General 



Municipal 
Municipal 
Municipal 
Municipal 
Municipal 
Municipal 
Municipal 
Municipal 
Municipal 
Municipal 
Municipal 
Municipal 
Municipal 
Municipal 
Municipal 
Municipal 
Municipal 
Municipal 
Municipal 
Municipal 
Municipal 
Municipal 
Municipal 
Municipal 
Municipal 
Municipal 
Municipal 
Municipal 
Municipal 



General Municipal 
General Municipal 
General Municipal 
General Municipal 
General Municipal 
General Municipal 
General Municipal 
General Municipal 
General Municipal 
General Municipal 
General Municipal 
General Municipal 
General Municipal 
General Municipal 



DPW 

DPW 

DPW 

DPW 

DPW 

DPW 

ConsCom 

ConsCom 

ConsCom 

ConsCom 

ConsCom 

ConsCom 

ConsCom 

ConsCom 

ConsCom 

ConsCom 

ConsCom 

ConsCom 

ConsCom 

ConsCom 

ConsCom 

ConsCom 

ConsCom 

ConsCom 

ConsCom 

ConsCom 

ConsCom 

ConsCom 

ConsCom 

ConsCom 
ConsCom 
ConsCom 
ConsCom 
ConsCom 
ConsCom 
ConsCom 
ConsCom 
ConsCom 
ConsCom 
ConsCom 
ConsCom 
ConsCom 
ConsCom 



or to take any other action relative thereto. (Requested by: Town Manager) 



64 



Selectman James Foley moved to indefinitely postpone action on this article. Seconded. 

Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee and Planning Board recommended unanimously 
in favor of indefinite postponement. Motion carried by unanimous voice vote. 

It was moved, seconded and so voted to move Article 24 after Article 25. 

ARTICLE 25 

To see if the Town will vote to add the following parcels to the list (as referenced in 
Article 18 of the Warrant for the April 3, 2000 Annual Town Meeting) on file in the 
office of the Planning Board and in the Office of the Town Clerk, said changes having 
been placed on file in the office of the Planning Board and in the Office of the Town 
Clerk by August 23, 2004. 

1) Land now/formerly of Carl Pescosolido, Assessor's Map 62B, Parcel 9, consisting of 
approximately 31.6 acres between County Road and the railroad tracks, lying generally 
south of the Ipswich River and being traversed by the Miles River. 

2) Land now/formerly of Jaqueline M. Gauthier Living Trust, Assessor's Map 53D, 
Parcel 10, consisting of approximately 17.3 acres between County Road and the Ipswich 
River. 

3) Land now/formerly of Parris Pelletier, Assessor's Map 41A, Parcel 3, consisting of 
approximately 44.8 acres along Pineswamp Road and extending West.; 

or to take any other action relative thereto. (Sponsored by: Open Space Committee) 

Selectman James Foley moved that the Town vote to add the following parcels to the list 
(as referenced in Article 18 of the Warrant for the April 3, 2000 Annual Town Meeting) 
on file in the office of the Planning Board and in the Office of the Town Clerk: 

1) Land now/formerly of Carl Pescosolido, Assessor's Map 62B, Parcel 9, consisting of 
approximately 31.6 acres between County Road and the railroad tracks, lying generally 
south of the Ipswich River and being traversed by the Miles River. 

2) Land now/formerly of Jaqueline M. Gauthier Living Trust, Assessor's Map 53D, 
Parcel 10, consisting of approximately 17.3 acres between County Road and the Ipswich 
River. 

3) Land now/formerly of Parris Pelletier, Assessor's Map 41 A, Parcel 3, consisting of 
approximately 44.8 acres along Pineswamp Road and extending West. 

Seconded. 

Board of Selectmen, Open Space Committee, Finance Committee and Planning Board 
recommended unanimously. Motion carried by unanimous voice vote 

65 



ARTICLE 24 

To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to: 

(1) sell and convey to the Essex County Greenbelt Association, for the sum of $1.00, 
property at 19 Hodges Way (Assessor's Map 23C, Lot 16C), and to execute any and all 
necessary instruments for the lot, which is to be subject to a conservation restriction over 
the entire area thereof, the latter prohibiting any structure above grade thereon; 

(2) sell and convey for a minimum purchase price to be established at town meeting, 
subject to such easements and/or covenants as the Board of Selectmen may prescribe, any 
of the following parcels obtained by foreclosure for nonpayment of taxes or by any other 
means: 

(a) 31 Bunker Hill Road (Map 62, Lot 23B), said conveyance to be subject to a 
drainage easement over the stormwater collection area, a covenant prohibiting 
alteration/degradation of heavily vegetated area of parcel, and a deed restriction 
prohibiting development of parcel as a separate house lot; 

(b) 84 Jeffreys Neck Road (Map 22D, Lot 148); said conveyance to be subject to a 
deed restriction prohibiting development of parcel as a separate house lot; 

or to take any other action relative thereto. (Sponsor: Department of Planning & 
Development) 

Planning Board member Tim Purinton moved that the Town vote to authorize the Board 
of Selectmen to: 

(1) sell and convey to the Essex County Greenbelt Association, for the sum of $1.00, 
property at 19 Hodges Way (Assessor's Map 23C, Lot 16C), and to execute any and all 
necessary instruments for the sale of the lot. 

(2) sell and convey for a minimum purchase price to be established at town meeting, 
subject to such easements and/or covenants as the Board of Selectmen may prescribe, any 
of the following parcels obtained by foreclosure for nonpayment of taxes or by any other 
means: 

(a) 31 Bunker Hill Road (Map 62, Lot 23B), said conveyance to be subject to a 
drainage easement over the storm-water collection area, a covenant prohibiting 
alteration/degradation of heavily vegetated area of parcel, and a deed restriction 
prohibiting development of parcel as a separate house lot for a sum of $23,000; 

(b) 84 Jeffreys Neck Road (Map 22D, Lot 148); said conveyance to be subject to a 
deed restriction prohibiting development of parcel as a separate house lot for the sum 
of $15,200; 

66 



and further to transfer the care, custody, maintenance and control of said parcels from 
the Treasurer to the Board of Selectmen for said purpose. Seconded. 

Planning Board, Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee recommended 
unanimously. Motion carried by unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 26 

To see if the Town will vote to reconsider any or all previous articles raising and/or 
appropriating money which have a direct impact on the levy for the next ensuing fiscal 
year, as contained in this warrant, for the purpose of completing a budget which is 
balanced and in compliance with the levy limit provisions of Proposition 2Vi, so called; or 
to take any other action relative thereto. (Requested by: Board of Selectmen) 

Selectman James\Foley moved that action on this article be postponed indefinitely. 
Seconded. Motion carried by unanimous voice vote. 

Motion to adjourn the Special Town Meeting was seconded and carried by unanimous 
voice vote. The meeting was adjourned at 11:33 p.m. 

And you are directed to serve this Warrant by posting attested copies thereof at the Post 
Office and at each of the meeting houses in the Town, by publication at least seven days 
prior to the time for holding said meeting in a newspaper published in, or having a 
general circulation in, the Town of Ipswich. 

Given unto our hands this twenty-seventh day of September in the year of our Lord, Two 
Thousand and Four. 

TOWN OF IPSWICH BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

Edward B. Rauscher 
Patrick J. McNally 
James W. Foley 
Elizabeth A. Kilcoyne 
Ingrid F. Miles 



67 



********* 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

Edward B. Rauscher, Chair 

Although the Board of Selectmen managed a number of 
important projects throughout the year, 2004 will best be 
remembered as the year our long- serving Town Manager 
retired. After 27 years of faithful service, George Howe 
left his post in July; and all can be certain that he 
enjoys his leisure pursuits with the same kind of energy 
that made him a successful chief executive in Ipswich for 
so long. James Foley, Vice-Chairman of the Board of 
Selectmen, served as volunteer Acting Town Manager into 
2005; and he deserves the gratitude of the Board of 
Selectmen and our fellow citizens for working long hours 
and performing the manager's duties with alacrity and 
professionalism. 

The search for a new Town Manager began in August, with the 
selection of a citizen committee to assist the Board of 
Selectmen in the process, by identifying and selecting 
finalist candidates. Chaired by Paul McGinley and working 
with MMA Consulting, the committee recommended three 
finalists to the Board of Selectmen by autumn's end. The 
Selectmen chose Robert Markel, a man of outstanding 
credentials and a wealth of experience in municipal 
government.- The Town Manager in Ipswich operates within a 
three-year contract; Mr. Markel' s commenced on February 9, 
2005. 

Serving as Acting Town Manager and working closely with the 
Board of Selectmen, Mr. Foley reached a contract settlement 
with all collective bargaining units in late summer. Funds 
for the settlement had been previously earmarked, and the 
October Town Meeting approved release of the funds to 
complete the process. 

The Board of Selectmen saw some changes this year as long- 
serving Selectmen James Engel and board member Harry 
Lampropoulos both stepped off the board. Our new members, 
Ingrid Miles and Elizabeth Kilcoyne, wasted no time in 
being active. Among the other sub- committees of our board, 
Ms. Miles continued her work on making the Ipswich 
Riverwalk a reality. Ms. Kilcoyne took on the ever- 
problematic downtown parking with early success and 
continuing work. 



68 



New life was breathed into two former municipal buildings 
in 2004. The former Memorial Building was transformed by 
the Oak Hill organization into housing units for the 
elderly, with a dedication ceremony in September. In 
addition, the Municipal Building Re-use Committee solicited 
and reviewed bids for the sale of the former Town Hall. 
Chaired by Selectmen Pat McNally, the committee recommended 
that a mixed-use proposal, including a theatre and 
coffeehouse, be selected for the Board of Selectmen to 
negotiate a Purchase and Sale agreement. The Board agreed, 
and negotiations on the terms of the sale continue today. 

Financially the Town struggled once again this year to 
provide the basic level of service within the Proposition 
2h. limit. Remarkably we have not had to lay-off any of our 
workforce; but we have sacrificed customary capital needs, 
such as vehicles and equipment replacement. At the October 
Town Meeting, permission was granted to use a small amount 
of budget money remaining from fiscal year 2004 to purchase 
the highest priority items; but much remains to be done in 
this area. 

Serving as your Utility Commissioners, the Board of 
Selectmen worked on a number of important initiatives in 

2004. The Town's municipal electric department has been 
going through change for several years, and the Electric 
Commission continues to look for sensible ways to operate 
the department at the highest level of service with the 
lowest cost to the rate-payer. No citizen is unaware of 
the power outages we have been experiencing, and all will 
appreciate the greater reliability we will experience when 
work on the electric distribution system is complete in 

2005. In addition, Commissioners embraced the idea of a 
wind energy proposal, which we hope to bring to fruition in 
the coming year. Our Wastewater Department continues to 
comply with tightening standards, and the Commission is 
developing a proposal to return some of our treated 
wastewater to the aquifer system. In the Water Department, 
our aggressive efforts toward distribution system upgrades, 
leak detection and seasonal rates were once again 
successful in 2004, yielding the third consecutive year of 
decreased water demand. Total water pumped in 2 004 was the 
second lowest in 15 years, a blessing for conservation 
purposes and also a challenge in a department that is fully 
funded by water rates. 



69 



As always, the Board of Selectmen owes a great debt of 
gratitude to all of those who help make our delivery of 
service in Municipal Government better each year with 
little or no increase in personnel. Special thanks to the 
many citizens who volunteer their free time to serve on 
numerous committees. Thanks also to the employees of the 
Town, who are often invisible and always critical to the 
Board's success in providing you with the services you need 
and expect . 

******** 

TOWN MANAGER 

James W. Foley, Acting Town Manger 

The year 2004 saw great change occur in the Ipswich 
municipal family. In July, Town Manager George E. Howe 
retired after twenty-seven years of faithful and dedicated 
service to the Town. George arrived in Ipswich in 1977 
from Merrimack, New Hampshire, and began a long career in 
Ipswich. He saw the face of Ipswich government change 
through the years and served with numerous Boards of 
Selectmen. George deserves the thanks of the entire Town 
for his complete professionalism during his tenure. 

In July, the Board of Selectmen appointed Vice Chairman 
James W. Foley as Acting Town Manager. The challenge of 
this position, with its variety of issues and projects, 
served as an example of the complex nature of municipal 
government . The next six months were extremely busy and 
completely fulfilling in every way. The job of Town 
Manager changes at a constant rate. Personnel issues, 
constituent services, financial planning, and the overall 
day-to-day operations of the Town make the position fast 
paced and rewarding. 

During the summer and fall, collective bargaining took up a 
majority of the Acting Manager's time. With assistance and 
cooperation, all contracts involving Police, Fire, DPW, 
Electric Light, Clerical, Library, and Dispatching were 
resolved and completed. The concept of collective 
bargaining can only be accomplished through a team effort 
involving every member. 

The Special Town meeting held in the fall allowed the 
purchase of much-needed equipment for Town departments. 
Some of this equipment was due for replacement three years 



70 



ago but, due to budget issues, was kept in service for 
extended periods . 

I would like to take this opportunity to thank the Board of 
Selectmen for their support during my stay in the Manager's 
office. I would also like to express my sincere gratitude 
to department directors, department heads, and Town staff 
for your loyalty and support during this time. Ipswich 
Town staff is second to none. Without the daily support 
and cooperation of Judy Sullivan and Jane Spellman, my 
short stay would have been extremely difficult. You are 
the best. 




A well attended reception was held at the Town Hall 
to thank Jim for his voluntary service 
as Acting Town Manager 
Left to right: James Foley, Judith Sullivan, Pamela Foley 

and Jane Spellman 



******** 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY - Charles D. Surpitski, Director 

POLICE DEPARMENT 

Charles D. Surpitski, Chief of Police 
Peter A. Foote, Deputy Chief 

The Police Department is indebted to the citizens and 
visitors to our community for their support and assistance 
in keeping our community safe. Concerned and involved 
citizens are key ingredients to the overall quality of 
community life. 



71 



As the statistics below will indicate, the Police 
Department had a very active year. Although we are 
fortunate that crimes against persons do not occur with 
great regularity, we as a community still face far too many 
domestic abuse cases and assaults. The police and the 
community must continue to support programs designed to 
assist victims and work to reduce these occurrences. 

Identity theft and fraud are rapidly increasing in our 
community, as is the case across the country. There was a 
300% increase in reported incidents of fraud and a 200% 
increase in reported cases of identity theft in 2004. We 
urge citizens to protect their personal information and 
visit the Police website ( www.town.ipswich.ma.us/police ) 
for helpful information on ways you can prevent becoming a 
victim. 

Our police officers continued to attend pertinent training 
classes in new crime trends, prevention of crimes, in- 
service training and other issues that afforded them the 
skills and knowledge to best meet the challenges that they 
and our neighbors may face. 

A community notification system was purchased late in 2003 
and used a number of times in 2004. This technology allows 
citizens to be informed by telephone of crimes, lost 
individuals, and other important information to enhance 
their safety. 

The Department continued to work closely with other town 
departments, regional organizations, other communities, and 
state agencies to ensure both our preparedness to meet 
occurrences of crime and our ability to rapidly and 
properly de-escalate them. 



Accidents - 316 
Assaults - 38 
Citations - 1011 
Larceny - 137 
ID theft - 15 
Alarms - 771 
Disturbances - 198 
Missing - 24 
Threats - 26 



Arrests - 156 
B & E - 46 
Domestic - 127 
Fraud/ the ft - 28 
PC - 52 
Animals - 312 
Medicals - 769 
Phone Calls - 65 



72 



******** 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 

Willard Maker, Acting Fire Chief 

Fire Chief Henry Michalski retired in September, after 
forty years in the Fire service, the last four years being 
in Ipswich. 

We received a new forestry/rescue truck, which contains 
water, hose and a pump for outside fires and carries 
medical and special rescue equipment. A new heavy-duty 
washer donated by a local business owner was installed. It 
is used for cleaning firefighting suits. 

A new vehicle exhaust system was installed in both the 
Central and Linebrook Fire Stations. It was purchased with 
a $52,000 federal grant obtained by Lieutenant Andy 
Theriault. The systems remove harmful diesel exhaust from 
the stations, reducing health risks to firefighters and 
soot that attaches to equipment. 

We have purchased four new breathing apparatus, 28 new air 
bottles, 27 firefighting suits; and we have upgraded all 
breathing apparatus to the latest safety standard with the 
aid of a $84,982 federal grant obtained by Lieutenant Andy 
Theriault. All of our firefighters will have new 
firefighting suits and up-to-date breathing equipment. 

In the S.A.F.E. program, firefighters instructed all 
children in kindergarten through 5 th grades in fire safety. 
During the car seat safety program, firefighter Rick Smith 
assisted many families by installing child safety seats. 

Firefighter Jeff Stone was hired as the department's newest 
career firefighter and completed the Mass. Fire Academy's 
recruit course. Some call firefighters trained and became 
certified as EMT's and Firefighter II. 

The department is involved in the quest for land and 
funding for a new fire station. The Central Street 
firehouse is approaching 100 years old, and desperately in 
need of replacement. 

Service calls for the year were as follows: Fires involved 
16 structures, three vehicles, and 28 other properties. 
The department provided service to 622 medical or rescue 



73 



calls, 91 motor vehicle accidents, 122 hazard calls, 288 
alarms, 18 out of town calls, and 604 other calls. 
Incidents are divided into six districts. In 2004, they 
were spread as follows: In- town - 615, County - 4 93, High - 
184, Linebrook - 175, Topsfield - 139, and Neck - 127. 

The Fire Prevention Division conducted 308 fire safety 
equipment inspections, 159 building inspections, 37 oil 
burner inspections, 33 LP gas permits, 40 storage tank 
permits, and 155 others. 

********* 

ANIMAL CONTROL 

Harry Leno, Animal Control Officer 

Dyan Katz, Assistant Annimal Control Officer 

The year of 2004 was the first complete year at our new 
state-of-the-art pound. It has been a pleasure for all, 
including the animals, to share such a functional and 
beautiful environment. Many thank you's must be passed on 
to all those who began the dream and all those who helped 
complete it. Among them would be the Ipswich Humane Group, 
the townspeople, and the Town's workforce. The 
volunteerism of the Ipswich Humane Group has been in place 
for the last twenty- four years. The department continues 
to be deeply appreciative for the ongoing everyday day 
support and. caring for the animals of Ipswich. 

The past year brought three positive rabies incidents. 
These incidents did not require any medical intervention. 
There was also one positive case of West Nile Virus 
reported by the Department of Public Health. The 
department's continued work with the local and state Public 
Health officials will help to educate the townspeople of 
Ipswich on any further health concerns involving the spread 
of diseases to humans, domestic pets, and wildlife. 

The department strives to educate the public on the 
importance of high quality pet care which will, in turn, 
improve the quality of pet and community life in the 
future . 

The department continues to enforce all animal issues, 
regulations, and bylaws that regulate the safety of our 
domestic animals. This will lend itself to the safety and 
quality of our neighborhood life. 



74 



Below are some of the incidents that the department dealt 
with during 2 004: 

Animals adopted: 

Dogs 3 

Cats 72 

Kittens 36 
Animals killed by motor vehicles - 185 
Citations issued - 193 
Complaints received - 4,670 
Complaints investigated - 4,327 
Dog licenses issued - 1,822 
Multi licenses issued - 65 
Dogs picked up - 114 
Animals found - 213 
Quarantine orders - 86 

********* 

HARBORS DEPARTMENT 

Charles D. Surpitski, Harbormaster 

Charles B. Schwartz, Assistant Harbormaster 

There were no major incidents on our waterways during the 
2004 boating season. Education, responsible boaters, 
continued patrols by our patrol boat and personal 
watercraft contributed heavily to this fact. 

The pump out boat, completing its fifth season, continues 
to help keep our waterways clean and pollution free. The 
program is funded by a grant and the service is free to 
boaters. Rowley has a similar program and, working in 
conjunction with our boat, seven day a week service is 
offered. Our boat pumped 3,750 gallons of effluent this 
season. 

Medical emergencies and boat groundings continue to occur, 
but our ability to rapidly respond with the patrol boat, 
Jet Ski, and Crane Beach personnel have contributed to the 
relatively minor nature of such incidents. 

Boating activity in general decreased this past summer. 
The contributing factors to this were the weather being 
inclement for a lot of the summer and the extremely high 
prices of gasoline and diesel fuel. 



75 



The Harbors Department is grateful to the dedicated members 
of the Waterways Advisory Committee for its untiring 
efforts, counsel, and support in the myriad of issues that 
we face each season. Much time and effort has been spent 
on the continuing river dredging project. 

There were a record 675 mooring permits issued, and 201 
seasonal launch permits were also issued. The decrease in 
the launch permits is indicative of the aforementioned 
weather and fuel prices. 

******** 

SHELLFISH DEPARTMENT 

Phillip Kent, Shellfish Constable 

The Shellfish Department continued its efforts to enforce 
and protect the resources throughout 2004. As in past 
years, personnel worked closely with the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts Department of Marine Fisheries, other area 
Shellfish Constables, and Town departments in monitoring 
water quality essential to a healthy shellfish product and 
to ensure the safety and proper harvesting of this most 
precious resource. 

We are pleased to report that shellfishing was a bit better 
in 2004 than in 2003. It also appears to look even better 
in 2005. 

There were a total of 6,690 bushels of clams harvested in 
2004. This translates into approximately 334,500 pounds. 
The Town Clerk issued 84 commercial shellfishing licenses, 
97 non-resident recreational licenses, 93 residential 
recreational licenses, and 144 family recreational 
licenses. 

Closure of the clamming flats following rain events 
continued to have a significant impact on the number of 
days/tides harvesting could occur. 

********* 

EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT 

Charles H. Cooper- Director 

This past year marked my second as Emergency Management 
Director for the Town of Ipswich. It has been a challenge 



76 



that I continue to thoroughly enjoy. This year we continued 
to build on programs that were started last year. 

This year I continued my emergency management education by 
taking several courses and training sessions in various 
topics, attended meetings at the Region 1 Headquarters in 
Tewksbury, as well as the Local Emergency Planning Council 
meetings. 

As part of the ongoing process of keeping our Comprehensive 
Emergency Management Plan up to date, we looked at a number 
of locations in town that could potentially be viewed as 
terrorist targets and provided this information to the 
State. We continue to believe that the greatest threats to 
residents of the Town of Ipswich are natural disasters and 
not man made; however we must be prepared for all. 
In conjunction with the Town of Rowley, we trained 
approximately twenty senior Boy Scouts in the CERT program. 
They now have the training and equipment to respond to a 
major emergency to augment the professional first 
responders, police, fire and EMT's. 

In May we offered free training by the National Weather 
Service Taunton Office in the Skywarn program. 
Approximately fifty residents took advantage of this 
training that was held at the Performing Arts Center at the 
High and Middle School . This three hour program taught the 
layperson what to look for when severe weather threatens 
us, and when to report their observations to the NWS. Many 
of the participants were also Amateur Radio Operators. 

Using the weather station located in the EOC at the Police 
Station, we continued to provide weather observations to 
the NWS Taunton Office either via amateur radio or 
telephone. 

This year we added Voice Over Internet (VoIP) capability to 
our Two Meter Amateur Repeater using the EchoLink software. 
This software is free to any licensed amateur radio 
operator and permits HAMS anywhere in the world to link 
into our repeater. We can also link our repeater to other 
repeaters using this same software. The NWS has used this 
capability to obtain reports from us. We utilized it to 
monitor the damage reports from the Florida hurricanes that 
were being sent to the National Hurricane Center (W4NHC) 
from the affected areas. 



77 



The Democratic National Convention was held in Boston in 
July. Due to our extensive communication capability, we 
were asked to provide back up communication for the 
American Red Cross and the Salvation Army and the State 
EOC, Boston EOC. Our net control was located in the 
Bridgewater EOC. Plans were drawn up to provide a staging 
area at the Ipswich High and Middle School. Had there been 
an incident in Boston that required a response from the Red 
Cross or Salvation Army, especially if temporary shelters 
were needed, responding units would stage at the high 
school and then move into the affected areas. A southern 
Massachusetts staging area was established in the 
Fairhaven, New Bedford, area as well. Fortunately, 
everything went smoothly, and it amounted to a great 
training opportunity, where various modes and frequencies 
were used and we learned what worked and what did not . Our 
EOC was operational for approximately 66 hours and was 
staffed by 10 dedicated local amateur radio operators who 
volunteered to work 4 -hour shifts. At one point during the 
operation the Town had a power failure and we shifted to 
portable emergency power and remained operational, just as 
we would have to do in a real emergency. 

On April 2 nd we will be offering an emergency communications 
workshop for anyone interested in radio communications. 
Although this training is of particular interest to amateur 
radio operators, anyone is welcome to attend. This is being 
co-sponsored by the ARRL- Eastern Massachusetts Amateur 
Radio Emergency Services (ARES) and Ipswich Emergency 
Management . 

I also hope this year to have Ipswich certified by the NWS 
as a Storm Ready community. Details on this program can be 
found on www . stormready . noaa . gov/ . This will involve 
placing weather receivers in a number of public building 
and also writing plans and policies to comply with the 
provisions of this program. 

PUBLIC WORKS DIRECTORATE - Robert C. Gravino, Director 

PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT 

Robert C. Gravino, Director 

The Public Works Department is a customer focused service 
organization, dedicated to maintaining and improving the 



78 



town's infrastructure through the efforts of a professional 
work force. With that as our mission, DPW incorporates an 
on-going review of what we do and how we do it, with the 
intent of delivering high quality service to our customers 
and enhancing the quality of life in our diverse community. 
Customer focus, continuous process improvement, human 
resource development, and resource management are the keys 
to our success. 

Public Works accomplished or is working on the following 
items in support of our mission: 

• Implemented Year 1 of the Storm Water Management Plan 
to comply with the Phase II Storm Water Rule 
Regulations of the Federal Clean Water Act. 

• Incorporate an Infrastructure Asset Management Program 
into the Town's existing Geographic Information 
Systems (GIS) mapping and databases, specifically for 
roadway and drainage infrastructure management . 

• Developed and implemented Operation and Maintenance 
plans for existing water quality appurtenances 
installed for storm water management. 

• Develop an expansion capacity analysis to determine 
the resources required for the DPW organization to 
bring fleet maintenance of all Town owned vehicles in- 
house . 

• Utilize the DPW Pavement Management Plan to identify 
and schedule those roads most in need of roadway 
improvement and maintenance . 

HIGHWAY DIVISION 

Steven McKay, Foreman 

A review of division operations determined the best 
utilization of personnel and equipment. In the warmer 
months, the focus of operations is on outdoor construction 
projects, where personnel skills and heavy equipment 
produce significant infrastructure repairs and improvements 
to roads, sidewalks, and catch basins. A work order system 
assists in prioritizing and scheduling assignments when 
weather or personnel availability precludes accomplishment 
of major jobs. 

Lafayette Street, Wayne Avenue, Riley Avenue, Putnam Road, 
Prescott Street, and Farragut Road were reclaimed and 
repaved, and sidewalks abutting those roads were 
reconstructed. Topsfield Road, from Farley Avenue to the 



79 



MBTA commuter rail crossing, was overlaid with 1H inches of 
hot top and a new pedestrian crossing was built over the 
railroad tracks. Roadway paving [Ih. inch overlay) was done 
on Mill Road, Warner Road, Linebrook Road (railroad tracks 
to School Street), Brownville Avenue, Mt . Pleasant Avenue, 
and Argilla Road (Rocky Hill Road to Burrage Lane) . 

FORESTRY DIVISION 

John Adams, Forestry Leader 

The Forestry budget is partially funded by the Utilities 
Department for line clearing that Forestry does for the 
Electric Division. A significant percentage of the line 
clearing performed this year occurred on Argilla, Turnpike, 
and Linebrook Roads. 

EQUIPMENT MAINTENANCE DIVISION 

Robert Hetnar, Diesel Mechanic 

Two replacement pick-up vehicles were purchased this year. 
Closer inspection and additional preventive maintenance of 
vehicles has helped extend the service life and stabilize 
maintenance costs of the DPW fleet . 

TRANSFER STATION 

The Transfer Station accepts yard waste only, specifically 
grass clippings, leaves, brush, and small branches, and is 
open Wednesdays and Saturdays, 8:00 AM until 3:30 PM. 
Reduced operations at the Transfer Station were a result of 
increasing costs to the Town, the costly duplication of 
Town funded curbside and Transfer Station disposal of trash 
and recyclables, and environmental issues related to the 
handling of metals and other items at the Transfer 
Station's location on Town Farm Road. White goods, 
electrical appliances, and TV's and computer monitors are 
now disposed of curbside by the Town's trash contractor 
through the purchase of a $25 sticker, available at the 
Public Works office in Town Hall. The Transfer Station is 
manned by a member of the Highway Division. 

The DPW sponsored special collections conducted at the 
Transfer Station accept oil based paints and related 
products, car batteries, fluorescent bulbs, and tires. The 
fall collection is held at the Transfer Station in 
conjunction with the Health Department's Household 



80 






Hazardous Waste Collection Day to better serve Town 
residents . 

SANITATION 

DPW takes every opportunity to educate residents that each 
pound of recyclable material that is diverted from the 
trash stream is a reduction in our costs, since the Town is 
charged a fixed fee for pickup of recyclables and a tipping 
fee for every pound of trash. The total tonnage of solid 
waste picked up in calendar year 2004 (5021 tons) decreased 
by 97 tons over that collected in 2003 (5118 tons) , a 
reduction of 1.9%. 

SNOW AND ICE OPERATIONS 

The winter of 2003/2004 was a long and harsh one for the 
Town employees who worked to keep the roads and public 
sidewalks safe and passable during the winter months. The 
cost for snow and ice operations exceeded the budgeted 
amount by $50,000. 

Access to homes by emergency response vehicles is the first 
priority for Town crews during snow and ice operations. 
Sidewalks in close proximity to schools are also a high 
priority for snow removal, due to the reduction in students 
being transported by the Town's bus contractor and the 
resultant increase in students walking to school. 







Photo courtesy of Kim Martineau 



******** 



PLANT & FACILITY OPERATIONS 

Joseph Lucido, Director of Plant and Facilities 

Currently in its fourth year, this Department has once again participa 
in some major projects as well as the day-to-day operations of Governm 
and School. This year we saw the relocation of the Ipswich District C 
to Newburyport, which created a vacant building that the citizens vote 
sell. We will continue to maintain the building until it is in fact s 




Joe Lucido is changing the sign 
in front of the old town hail buildinc 



sy of Kate 

We avoided a potential catastrophe when approximately 200 bricks tumbl 
the ground from the uppermost portion of the North wall of the Central 
Station. A temporary shoring was done, and the final repair was comple 
in July, reinforcing the roof structure, which has stood tall since 19 
We have also modified the overhead door to the squad bay to accommodat 
new Squad. 

The Police Station received a much-needed facelift in the call/classro 
that included a new floor and lighting. We also completed the install 
of the emergency generator and additional circuits. The department has 
continued its work on the New Town Hall, replacing carpeting with tile 
flooring in on the lower level. We are continuing to address the HVAC 
system upgrades in the building. 

On the other side of the coin, we have completed a window 
replacement project at the Doyon School and continue to 
work at the Middle/High School on daily maintenance issues. 
With assistance from Public Works, the department was 



82 



involved in the construction of the Storage/Ticket Facility 
at the High School and was involved in the Stadium Lighting 
Project as well as the landscaping surrounding the 
concession stand. We were also responsible for the 
installation of a concrete walkway at the High School and a 
new concrete shot put circle for Track and Field. 

The Plant and Facilities Department will continue to 
provide the essential service needed to maintain and 
preserve the infrastructure of our Town buildings and 
facilities and continue to look at long range capital 
improvements. 

•*■****■'*•** 

CEMETERIES/PARKS DEPARTMENT 

James Graffum, Superintendent 

The Cemetery and Parks Division is responsible for the 

upkeep and maintenance of nine cemeteries and seven parks. 

This past year new fencing was installed at the northeast 

perimeter at Locust Grove Cemetery. 

We gave improved the walking paths at Strawberry Hill in 

addition to the construction of a new parking area. Also, 

an information kiosk, appropriate signage, and benches were 

placed at three vista locations. 

We maintain all of the Town's open space, the Town commons, 

Crane Beach Ipswich resident boardwalk and the Pavilion 

Beach area. 

During the winter season as weather permits, Bakers Pond 

and the rink at Bialek Park are plowed off to accommodate 

skaters. 

We also assist civic groups in the many activities that 

take place throughout the year as well as supply aid to the 

Public Works Department in snow removal, sanding 

operations, and any other emergency situations as needed. 







Photo courtesy of Kim Martineau 

There were eighty-nine funerals in 2004. 
REVENUE 



CHAPEL TENT: 


1,500 


FOUNDATIONS : 


8,828 


OPENINGS : 


39,250 


PERPETUAL CARE 


6,750 


SALE OF LOTS 


8,100 


TOTAL : 


64,42 




******** 



DEPARTMENT OF CODE ENFORCEMENT - James A. Sperber, Director 
BUILDING DEPARTMENT - James A. Sperber, Building Inspector 



Category / 
Construction 


#0f 

Permits 


Total Fees 


Value of Work 


Additions 


45 


$28,600.00 


$3,868,377.00 


Attached Accessory- 


2 


$1,485.00 


$205,000.0 


Certificate of 
Occupancy 


22 


$550.00 


N/A 


Commercial - New 


2 


$445.00 


$60,000.00 


Commercial - Alter. 


11 


$915.00 


$101,500.00 


Decks & Porches 


32 


$3,369.90 


$317,520.00 


Demo & Reconstruct 


21 


$27,687.00 


$4,268,025.00 


Demolition 


11 


$6,435.00 


$121,335.00 


Detached Accessory 


40 


$4,350.00 


$475,791.00 


Fence 


9 


$340.00 


$24,652.00 


Multi-Family Dwelling 


14 


$25,039.00 


$3,511,820.00 


Miscellaneous 


55 


$3,719.98 


$348,537.00 



84 



Remodel / Alteration 


150 


$24,386.00 


$4,305,984.00 


Repair 


90 


$5,975.00 


$660,645.00 


Roofs, Siding, 
Windows 


191 


$13,567.41 


$1,621,783.00 


Single Family 
Attached 


3 


$6,400.00 


$603,000.00 


Single Family 
Dwelling 


21 


$54,394.00 


$7,460,472.00 


Sign 


26 


$1,580.00 


$68,040.00 


Stove 


12 


$620.00 


$26,850.00 


Swimming Pools 


11 


$4,051.50 


$460,467.00 


Tents 


3 


$35.00 


$7,105.00 


Totals 


771 


$213,944.79 


$ 28,516,903.00 



Plumbing 



Total Fees 



Gas 



Total Fees 



254 



$23,465.00 



229 



$13,160.00 



** As in prior years, fees for plumbing and gas permits are 
split 50% / 50% for the salary of Plumbing / Gas Inspector 
Robert Hyde and the Town of Ipswich. 

Please remember that building permits are required for not 
only new construction, but for repairs and replacement of 
existing structures, decks, sheds, signs, & fences also. 
If you have any question about whether your project may 
require a building permit, please call our office at 978- 
356-6605. Thank you. 

******** 

HEALTH DEPARTMENT - Colleen E. Fermon, Health Agent 
Following is the yearly report of activities for 2004: 

Licenses and Permits Issued 

Food Service 66 

Retail Food 26 

Caterer 7 

Temporary Food 27 

Mobile Food 6 

Frozen Desserts 3 

Disposal System Construction 
Permits 104 

Septic Haulers 23 



85 



Septic Installers 56 

Septic System Inspectors 27 

Swimming Pools 8 

Recreational Camps 6 

Massage Practitioners 30 

Massage Establishments 13 

Tanning Facilities 3 

Private Well Permits 2 

Tobacco 24 

Funeral Directors 2 

Health Inspections and Investigations 

Food Service Inspections 186 

Housing Inspections 13 

Nuisance & Environmental 

Complaints 29 

Percolation Tests 106 

Deep Hole Observations 221 

Septic System Inspections 312 

Swimming Pool Inspections 7 

Surface Water Testing 98 

Sealer of Weights 
& Measures Inspections 

Liquid Measuring Meters 93 

Scales & Balances 73 

Scanners 11 



Community Health 
Immunization and Clinics 

Influenza 
Pneumonia 
Tetanus 
Well Elderly 
Clinics 



lies 


Public Health Follow-up 




404 


Lyme Disease 







Camphylobactor 


2 





Crytosporidium 


2 


12 


Salmonella 


4 




Hepatitis A 


1 




Hepatitis B 


4 




Hepatitis C 


6 




Streptococcus 


1 




Tuberculosis 


2 




Influenza 


5 




Vibrio 


1 




Parahaemolyticus 






Pertussis 


3 




MRSA 


1 



86 



Regulations Adopted 

The Board of Health adopted a Private Well Regulation 
effective December 16, 2004. Ipswich Board of Health 
Septic System regulations and Board of Health Fee Schedules 
were amended effective December 16, 2004 and December 30, 
2004, respectively . 

Board of Health Members: Susan Hubbard, Chairperson, Carl 
Hiltunen and Spencer Amesbury. 

•*■*•****** 

ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 

Robert A. Gambale, Chairman 
Dana P.Jordan, Vice -Chair 

In 2004, twenty-five petitions were submitted to the Zoning 
Board of Appeals: thirteen special permit requests, all but 
two of which were granted; six variance requests, four of 
which were granted; six appeals of the Building Inspector's 
decision, all but one of which were upheld; and two 
requests for Comprehensive Permits (one was approved, the 
other is ongoing) . 

Interestingly, the number of petitions submitted this year 
was more than 75% lower than the average number submitted 
over the past six years. However, the two Comprehensive 
permit applications, because of their magnitude, kept the 
ZBA busy. Although comprehensive permit proposals require 
lengthy deliberation, multiple meetings and frequent site 
visits, the Board is committed to working diligently to 
help Ipswich in attaining its goal of providing affordable 
housing. 

The year 2004 was a year of transition for the Zoning Board 
of Appeals. To replace long-term members Keith Hughes, 
David Mollica and Arthur Sotis, who left in December of 
2003, the Selectmen appointed Roger LeBlanc, who moved up 
from alternate member; Ben Fierro; and Dana Jordan, who 
returned to the Board after a eight year absence. Robert 
Bodwell was appointed as an alternate. 

Linda Valle, Administrative Assistant to the ZBA, resigned 
after many years of dedicated service to the Town. She 
moved on to employment closer to home. Linda was a valuable 



87 



and well -liked employee, and her resignation was accepted 
with regret. We wish her the best. 

The Board extends appreciation to Jim Sperber, Building 
Inspector, and Eric Coville, Building Administrative 
Assistant, for their support and welcomes Marie Rodgers as 
the new ZBA Administrative Assistant. 

******** 
DEPARTMENT OF PLANNING & DEVELOPMENT - Glenn C. Gibbs, Director 

PLANNING & DEVELOPMENT DEPARTMENT 

Glenn C. Gibbs, Director 

The Department of Planning & Development is responsible for 
guiding the development and conservation of land in the 
Town of Ipswich, both through the regulatory process and 
through the development and implementation of long-range 
plans. It does this in part by providing support and 
guidance for each of the boards and commissions within its 
directorate: Planning Board, Conservation Commission, the 
Historical Commission, and the Affordable Housing 
Partnership (reports on their activities are given below) . 
The Department also provides support to the Open Space 
Committee and various ad hoc committees. Listed below are 
some of the initiatives undertaken by the Department in 
2004: 

> Coordinated the successful effort to establish the 
County Road Economic Opportunity Area (EOA) and to 
designate New England BioLabs as a certified project; 
in exchange for a state tax credit and minimal local 
tax relief, NEB agreed to fund local initiatives in 
the amount of at least $625,000 and perhaps as much as 
$1,625 million over the next 15 years. 

> Prepared the Request for Proposals (RFP) for the reuse 
of the former town hall, and assisted the Municipal 
Building Reuse Committee with its review and selection 
of a preferred developer for the property. 

> Helped the newly- formed Community Development Plan 
Implementation Task Force undertake its responsibility 
to advocate for and implement the 2003 CDP. 






88 



> Drafted several zoning articles for fall town meeting, 
including a revision to allow accessory apartments 
more broadly than currently allowed, and a 
modification of building height requirements town- 
wide. 

> Enlisted a graduate student team from Tufts University 
to develop a bylaw requiring property owners to 
minimize the impacts of non-point source pollution 
when disturbing more than an acre of land. 

> Updated the subsidized housing inventory of units that 
qualify under 40B, and obtained recertif ication under 
Executive Order 418 for the Town's affordable housing 
efforts. 

> Initiated negotiations that may lead to the 
acquisition of a large property in the eastern coastal 
area of town which has significant environmental and 
wildlife habitat values. 

> Continued coordination and oversight of the Downtown 
Riverwalk Project, which is currently under 
construction and slated for completion by no later 
than fall 2005. 




89 




Photo k map courtesy of Brent Mitchell, QLF 



The only personnel change for the Department in 2004 was 
the welcoming back of Tracie Hines as the Open Space 
Program Manager. Tracie agreed to return temporarily after 
a suitable replacement could not be found. A search for a 
new open space program manager is currently underway. 



******** 

PLANNING BOARD 

David T. Santomenna, Co -Chair 
Charles Allen, Co-Chair 

In keeping with recent trends, the year 2004 was a fairly 
busy year for the Planning Board. The Board functioned 
efficiently under the dual leadership structure adopted in 
2003: David Santomenna continued in the role of chair for 
Board meetings and Charlie Allen maintained his role as 
chair for policy and zoning initiatives. In early January 
of 2005, the Santomenna' s family move to Hamilton left a 
vacancy for a full Board member. Ipswich's MAPC 
representative, John Soininen, was appointed to the role of 
full Board member, and Tim Purinton was elected to serve as 
co-chair in Santomenna' s place. The Board will miss the 
skill, warmth and wit Santomenna brought to the role of co- 
chair, and thanks him with deep appreciation for his 
service. 



90 



Planning Matters 

The Board continued its role in implementing the Community 
Development Plan (CDP) , adopted by the Board in July of 
2003 and by vote of Special Town Meeting in the Fall of 
2003. Led by co-chair Charlie Allen, and in close 
collaboration with the Planning Director, the Board 
sponsored eight zoning articles for vote at Town Meeting; 
all but one were adopted. The articles included revisions 
to the Great Estates provision of the zoning bylaw, 
clarification and strengthening of certain provisions in 
the Town's Inclusionary Housing Bylaw, expansion of 
accessory apartment provisions, and refinement of Open 
Space Preservation Zoning to further encourage the 
appropriate use of this "cluster'' style of development. An 
amendment that would allow for certain non- residential 
development in the RRA District (similar to that permitted 
on the Great Estates properties) was debated on town 
meeting floor and postponed for further review. 

In a separate Planning initiative, the Board voted to adopt 
the Ipswich Town Character Statement in September of 2004. 
Please refer to the preceding section of this report, 
Department of Planning and Development , for a more in-depth 
description of this newly adopted component of the 
Community Development Plan. 

Regulatory Matters 

The year 2004 saw a number of relatively complex 
development applications before the Board. The Board 
reviewed a total of 13 special permit applications, two of 
which were withdrawn and two remained pending in the public 
hearing process at the end of the calendar year. One 
approved project made use of the Town's "Infill" provision, 
passed by Fall Town Meeting in 2003; the project creates 
two single-faimly houses and contributes $100,000 to the 
Town's Affordable Housing Trust Fund. A special permit 
application for the construction of 17 new townhouses at 6 
Essex Road was also approved; the project will create one 
permanently affordable unit and will also provide for a 
payment of $70,000 into the Housing Trust Fund. Two 
special permit applications made use of the zoning bylaw' s 
Open Space Preservation Development (cluster) provision, 
one on Kimball Avenue and one off Howard Street. As of 
this writing, the Board continues to review a special 
permit application for the development of housing on the 
former site of St. Stanislaus Church on Washington Street. 



91 



In addition to the above, the Board reviewed and approved 
three applications for site plan review, two definitive 
subdivisions, and one scenic road proposal for the 
relocation of a driveway. The Board reviewed and endorsed 
nine applications for ANR (Approval Not Required under 
Subdivision Control Law) . 

We thank Glenn Gibbs, Director of Planning and Development, 
and Kate Day for their professionalism and dedication in 
support of the Board and interests of the town. 

CONSERVATION COMMISSION 

David Standley, Chair 
Jennifer Hughes, Vice Chair 
David Pancoast, Conservation Agent 
Marie Rodgers, Recording Secretary 

The Conservation Commission is composed of seven appointed 
town residents who serve as unpaid volunteers. 2004 saw two 
associate members serve, Nat Harris from January to April 
and Sissy ffolliott from August until December, when she 
was appointed as a full Commissioner. Sissy is a local 
organic farmer with previous and continuing service on the 
Ipswich Open Space Committee. Marie Rodgers left the 
Commission in December to assume similar but more expansive 
duties with the ZBA. 

The Commission serves the public and Town regarding 
conservation and land preservation activities in the 
community, but most of its time is occupied with its formal 
role as local environmental regulatory board under the 
Massachusetts Wetlands Protection Act and the Ipswich 
Wetlands Protection Bylaw. In 2004 it also continued its 
role in land acquisition/ management issues of open space 
in concert with the Open Space Committee, the Open Space 
Program Manager, and the Board of Selectmen. The Commission 
may lawfully accept gifts of land or money or other value 
for conservation purposes. 

In 2004, the Commission continued regulatory oversight of 
complex projects, including New England Biolabs' project on 
County Road, and Turner Hill's construction of an eighteen- 
hole golf course with housing development on Topsfield 
Road. This year the Commission took over 162 official 
regulatory actions, with major filings listed below. 



92 






Numerous emergencies and ongoing violations were also dealt 
with but are not listed. This list compares the 2004 new 
permitting activities with the previous six calendar years, 
indicating significant increases in several categories. 



Activity 


1998 


1999 


2000 


2001 


2002 


2003 


2004 


Orders of 

Conditions/ 

Amendments 


64 


63 


40 


43 


40 


39 


61 


Orders of Resource 
Area Delineation 











5 


2 


7 


3 


Determinations of 
Applicability 


47 


26 


45 


27 


21 


33 


41 


Certificates of 
Compliance 


16 


25 


13 


24 


17 


17 


18 


Extension Permits 


5 


2 


14 


12 


4 


5 


6 


Enforcement Actions 


6 


8 


10 


8 


7 


15 


17 


Totals 


190 


201 


166 


155 


137 


155 


213 



To accomplish this permitting process, Commission members 
attended 23 regularly scheduled evening meetings, visited 
numerous projects and fielded dozens of Citizen's Queries. 
Staff continues to respond to hundreds of routine queries, 
and to inspect all proposed project sites before hearings 
and during work. 

In 2004 the Commission continued to deal with several 
difficult and vexing situations of direct non-compliance 
with the laws and regulations and with Commission Orders. 
These efforts required considerable time and energy. They 
point out the desirability of greater public awareness and 
understanding of the wetlands laws, regulations and 
procedures; the need for an enhanced program of project 
inspections; and the need for a more effective, efficient, 
rational and fair basis and system for enforcement. The 
Commission is currently attempting to address those needs, 
within its capabilities and workload. 

A complex and difficult issue of appropriate and timely 
response to environmental changes resulting from beaver 
activity has required considerable time of the Commission 
and other Town boards. State laws limit the options and 
times for reacting to changes in stream flow and water 
levels resulting from beaver activity, and the lack of 
market for furs and trapping constraints limits the 
professional practice of trapping. Local agencies find 
themselves navigating among these factors: concerns for 
environment, public health and safety, concerns from 



93 



affected residents, and public opinion regarding treatment 
of the animals. Further, municipalities are constrained by 
law from expending public funds for private benefit, so 
situations in which no direct public interest or property 
is affected must be resolved by private initiatives. No 
fully satisfactory resolution of this dilemma has yet been 
devised, despite continuing efforts. 



******** 



HISTORICAL COMMISSION 

John P. Moss Jr., Chairman 

The annual Mary Conley Award was presented to Trustees of 
the Memorial Hall and architect Chris Doktor. The hall, 
which was first constructed in the early twentieth century 
as a memorial to those who served in the Civil War and 
World War I, was used by the Grand Army of the Republic, 
The American Legion, The Women's Auxiliary and most 
recently by the Recreation Department. It has now been 
renovated into seven affordable units of housing for the 
elderly. Walter Pojasek presented the award to trustees 
Roger Burke, David Lane, Rev. Merle Pimentel and Barbara 
Pimentel at the January 31, 2005, Selectmen's meeting. 

The Commission once again proposed amending the Demolition 
Delay bylaw by extending the length of the delay from six 
months to one year. With the support of the Selectmen and 
the Planning Board the proposal was approved by town 
meeting. Ipswich has now joined other communities in 
Massachusetts with a demolition delay by-law of one year. 
We anticipate that there will be further revisions in the 
bylaw to present to town meeting to help preserve the 
historic structures in Ipswich. We look forward to working 
more closely with the Planning Board on future revisions of 
the bylaw. Meanwhile, Commission member Mathew Cummings 
has been working with the building department to insure 
that those who want to alter or demolish historic buildings 
understand the bylaw and procedures. 

The Commission also played an active role in the 
development of the plan for the use of the old town hall . 
Matthew Cummings and Sue Nelson of Goodship Research helped 
the Commission in drafting a report on the history and 
architectural significance of the building. This report 
became part of the request for proposals when the town 
began its search for a developer to revive the old hall. 



94 



The Commission also had two members who served on the 
Building Re-use Committee that evaluated the proposals and 
made the final recommendation to the Selectmen. At years 
end the Selectmen were negotiating with the chosen 
developer, Entertainment Management Corporation (EMC) . 
EMC's proposal allowed for the preservation of the greatest 
amount of interior as well as exterior portions of the 
building. 

The Commission approved several demolition permits. Most 
significant was the permit to demolish the St. Stanislaus 
Church on Washington Street . The church has not been used 
for several years but was the spiritual home of many 
citizens of French heritage. The testimony at the public 
hearing from neighbors and former members of the Church 
supported the Commission conclusion that the building no 
longer had the architectural or historical significance to 
warrant the imposition of the demolition delay bylaw. The 
Commission also signed off on an addition to the house at 
15 Spring Street and the demolition of a shed at 17 County 
Street. Commission members participated in the Heritage 
Landscape Inventory program and received an education on 
the old railway depot from Alan MacMillan. Mr. MacMillan 
will present a slide show on the station and has presented 
the Commission with one of the three original train depot 
signs. 

Finally, Charles Shurcliff presented the Shurcliff family 
proposal toe rename the "pocket park" on County Street as 
"Sawmill Point" to better reflect the history of the site. 
The area around the County Street Bridge was the site of 
various mill buildings housing factories utilizing the 
waterpower of the Ipswich River. The park had been named 
"Sydney's Reservation". The park has been renovated and 
there will be a plaque explaining the history of the site. 
The wording of the plaque and the renaming of the park were 
approved by the Commission. The Shurcliff family deserves 
credit their efforts in beautifying and preserving this 
piece of historic Ipswich. 



******** 



HOUSING PARTNERSHIP 

Michael Schaaf, Chairman 

At the beginning of 2004, Michael Schaaf took over the 
chairmanship from William "Jay" Gallagher, who capably 



95 



guided the Partnership over the previous two years . Under 
Schaaf's leadership, the Ipswich Affordable Housing 
Partnership undertook several initiatives, including: 

> Developing review criteria to be used by the 
Partnership when evaluating affordable housing 
proposals; 

> Updating the Partnership's goals & strategies to make 
them fully consistent with, and as comprehensive as, 
the goals and policies of the Community Development 
Plan's housing component; 

> Provided $6,500 in down payment assistance to an 
individual purchasing an affordable condominium at 6 
Saf ford Street, under the Town's first-time homebuyer 
program; 

> Assisting with the creation of an affordable housing 
trust fund and a trust fund committee to oversee it. 

Other activities of the Partnership in 2004 included: 

> reviewing, with project proponents, proposed housing 
developments, including a 17 unit multi-family 
development at 6 Essex Road, an 18 unit multi -family 
proposal at 20-22 Washington Street, and a 4 0B 
development at 82 Topsfield Road, and providing 
comments and direction; 

> assisting the Planning Board with the development of 
housing-related zoning initiatives. 

Current members of the Partnership are Michael Schaaf , 
William '"Jay" Gallagher, Ed Dick, Don Greenough, Don Bowen, 
Karen Wallen, Don Gill, and Jim Warner. Staff assistance 
in 2004 was provided by Glenn Gibbs, Marie Rodgers, and 
Kate Day. 



96 



******** 



DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN SERVICES - Elizabeth M. Dorman, 
Director 

RECREATION DEPARTMENT 

Elizabeth M. Dorman, Recreation Director 

The Recreation Department continued its mission to maintain 
a variety of programs, services, and activities to enhance 
the social, physical, and emotional well being of all our 
citizens. A starfish was adopted as the department logo to 
represent our goal of making a difference in people's 
lives. It is based on a story about a man asking a young 
boy why he was gathering starfish on a beach. When the boy 
explained he was trying to save them, the man responded it 
would be impossible to save them all. The boy in turn said 
he could make a difference to the one in his hand. 

Family events this year included the July 4th Parade & 
Field Day, a Halloween parade & program, and parades on 
Memorial Day and Veterans' Day organized by local veterans' 
groups. Cooperation with the Ipswich Holiday Happenings 
provided another memorial tree lighting ceremony and Santa 
Parade in conjunction with local shopping initiatives. 

Summer offerings included tennis lessons at the high school 
courts, golf lessons at Ipswich Country Club, Workreation 
job training and social events for young teens, Jr. Summer 
Fun, our annual youth Sand Sculpture Day at Crane's Beach, 
and drop-in activities at Bialek Park with optional field 
trips. Swim lessons were contracted at the YMCA and 
resident lot parking attendants were contracted at Crane's 
Beach. Community programs featured an outdoor concert by 
the West Newbury Volunteer Fire Association Band as well as 
two by the Ipswich Community Band, a UNH Caravan Show, a 
magic show by Rich Nunziato on "Harry Potter's Birthday", 
and a Kids Dog Show with a demonstration by the Old Colony 
Obedience Club. 



97 







Fall activities included after school programs with 
homework and computer Projects, crafts, adventure and 
sports activities, cooking, quilting and knitting projects, 
and weekly off-site trips to museums, movies, and bowling 
activities. Winter programs included two learn-to-ski 
programs for grades 3-5 and 6-8, several February vacation 
week activities including a Harry Potter Day, and adult 
sessions of volleyball and ping pong. Golf classes were 
offered at the Rowley Country Club for children during 
spring and fall seasons. 

Town Hall facilities including a program room, kitchen and 
snack bar area, cafeteria/lounge, crafts room, and 
gymnasium were scheduled by the Recreation Department so 
that a number of local sports, scouts, and social service 
agencies could hold meetings and offer programs for 
residents of all ages. 

A used Dodge Caravan donated by a member of the Friends of 
Recreation support group provided additional transportation 
for students in our after school and summer programs. The 
Friends group was combined with C.A.S.E., Cooperative After 
School Experiences, a new initiative designed to provide 
affordable after-school child care for parents willing to 
share volunteer duties for the program. 



The seven-member Recreation Commission and Recreation 
Director met regularly throughout the year to discuss 
programs, facilities, and policies as well as to plan for 
the future. Members continued to volunteer at a number of 
programs . 



98 






***■***''** 



YOUTH SERVICES 

Marcia Ford, Youth Director 

Youth services in Ipswich are dedicated to improving the 
lives of Ipswich youth by offering a number of varied 
programs to meet recreational, academic, and social needs of 
this unique population. Our foundation continues to be 
community collaboration, and many programs were developed as 
joint ventures with other local agencies in direct response 
to community needs. 

Community service projects were organized for volunteer 
teens, church youth groups, and those referred through the 
local courts and Juvenile Diversion programs. They were 
involved in cleaning and painting projects including an 
attractive sports mural on an outdoor wall of the shed at 
Bialek Park. Others provided outdoor work at park sites and 
some services for needy senior citizens. 



§^SMIW^i^ 




Photo courtesy of Elizabeth Dorman 



After school clubs continued, led by local students and 
experts recruited to teach a variety of classes. Homework 
sessions led by staff and supportive volunteers were 
incorporated into the daily programs, and inter- 
generational experiences with senior citizens helping to 
teach children knitting and quilting. Thursday early 
release days provided opportunities for field trips to 
various educational and recreational sites. 



99 



Talk To a Friend, our peer leadership program for Ipswich 
Youth, met weekly to receive training based on current youth 
issues. Many of them attended a regional conference a 
conflict resolution. Peer Leaders also helped chaperone 
activities for younger children, assumed some mentoring and 
mediation responsibilities, and organized intergeneration 
suppers with local senior citizens. 

The Zone Cafe continued serving as a focal point for teen 
programs, and a web site was developed to survey local 
teens' suggestions about new programs and activities .Middle 
School drop- in nights and dances continued weekly to serve 
younger teens. The student -operated snack bar provided on 
site training in retail sales and management while offering 
reasonably price items to attendees. Teens were also an 
integral part of the creation of a written policy manual 
for Cafe operations. 

Family advocacy services were provided on an asneeded basis 
to families in need who met with the youth director to 
determine their current needs and secure connections to 
available services. Regular meetings provided further 
monitoring and coordination of related services. In addition, 
the director was available for after-hours' support and 
crisis intervention for at-risk families. 

Regular training sessions were provided for summer and school 
year staff members to maintain their skills in safety 
practices, basic first aid, motivation of students, conflict 
resolution, and group management. The outdoor project 
adventure site continued to serve as team building resource 
and field trip destination for our younger charges. 

******** 

COUNCIL ON AGING 

Diane Mitchell, Director 

A wide variety of programs for senior citizens of Ipswich 
were provided under the umbrella of Council on Aging 
Services . 

A senior center operated weekdays, 8:00-4:00, at the Town 
Hall. Three part-time receptionists welcomed guests, 
answered the phone, and assisted with the daily operation 
of the center. 



100 



Regular programs included the Silver Strands choral group, 
a book discussion group, bridge and card groups, knitting 
and quilting groups, art classes and a monthly lunch club. 
Health-related programs included monthly health screenings, 
weekly blood pressure clinics, a monthly nutrition program, 
Tai Chi, tennis, exercise and line dancing classes, and a 
swimming group. The COA Travel Club attended an overseas 
trip sponsored by the Friends of the Ipswich Elderly; and 
day trips to various locations were held throughout the 
year. 




Special offerings included inter-generational programs, a 
dining program, a safe driving clinic, an Alzheimer's 
disease seminar, an Elderlaw Education program, free 
cardiovascular screenings, a summer picnic, computer 
clinics, speakers on a variety of health, financial and 
legal issues, social gatherings for special observances and 
classes for a wide range of interests. A monthly newsletter 
written by the Director reached 1,700 elder households 
through support of local advertisers and a grant for 
postage. A Caregivers Support Group helped those dealing 
with frail elders. The Director continued to coordinate 
the Senior Citizen Property Tax Work-Off Program that 
placed five senior citizens in paid positions in various 
town departments. 

A handicapped accessible, 12 -passenger van continued to 
provide local transportation to Ipswich seniors. Ipswich 
senior citizens were provided over 8,000 one-way rides on 
the COA van, logging approximately 20,000 miles of service. 
The Friends group continued to raise funds and support 
projects that fell outside of the COA budget. The Friends 



101 



also contributed to a Christmas party for 185 seniors held 
at the gymnasium at the town hall and the purchase of six 
Dell computers, which were used for computer training 
classes for senior citizens. Grants from the Executive 
Office of Elder Affairs and the Coburn Charitable Society 
provided a part-time administrative assistant, a part-time 
activities coordinator, a volunteer recognition luncheon, 
and gasoline for the COA van. 

The Outreach program enlisted a corps of 40 volunteers who 
provided 2,175 hours of volunteer service to local elders. 
This program also provided volunteers who drove senior 
citizens 20,862 miles to out-of-town medical appointments. 
Other services of the Outreach program included social 
visits, phone calls, help with chores, and guidance in 
making personal, medical, housing and financial decisions. 
Other assistance programs included Money Management and 
Bill Paying for elders and free income tax preparation 
provided by trained AARP volunteers. 

Town contributions to Action, Inc., provided fuel 
assistance to those who qualified. Contributions to 
SeniorCare provided support for elderly still living on 
their own who needed outside support to facilitate their 
independent living arrangements. 

A seven-member council met monthly to review programs and 
operations and to plan additional offerings. 

******** 

EASTERN ESSEX DISTRICT 
DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS' SERVICES 

Terrance P. Hart, District Director 

This department is charged under Chapter 115 Massachusetts 
General Laws with providing services to veterans, their 
survivors and dependents. Principal workload under state 
law includes the administration of aid to veterans and 
dependents, which deals with the unpredictable variables of 
illness, unemployment, unemployability, labor disputes and 
the economy. Communities fund this program, which is 
subsequently 75% reimbursed the following fiscal year by 
the Commonwealth. This is a need-based program; and the 
department is required to conduct periodic comprehensive 
review of the cases to insure no substantive facts have 
changed, while working with the veteran to identify 



102 



alternative or long-term solutions to individual 
circumstances. During the calendar year, 12 Ipswich 
veterans/widows were on this program for varying periods. 
Under state law, the department also assists qualified 
veterans to obtain bonuses; and qualified veterans, widows 
and parents to obtain state annuities, property tax 
abatements, and other benefits. 

The Veterans' Services program also mandates extensive 
interaction within the federal community, principally with 
the Department of Veterans' Affairs. The Veterans' Service 
Officer (VSO) assists veterans and their dependents in 
filing for pensions, service connected injury/illness 
compensation, dependency indemnity compensation for 
survivors, VA healthcare enrollment, insurance claims, 
decedent claims, and many other issues. Federal benefits 
processed by this department are paid directly to those 
eligible to receive the assistance or entitlement. In 2004, 
the VA sent 1.23 million dollars to eligible recipients in 
Ipswich, of which the current staff is responsible for 
approximately $406,000 dollars paid to or saved by those 
assisted in Ipswich. 

Additionally, the department interacts within the federal 
community to correct military records, obtain needed 
documentation and insure veterans/dependents receive awards 
and recognition to which entitled. The VSO provided 
information, advice or assistance to 133 of the Town's 1156 
identified veterans and 15 of the 275 identified veterans' 
widows during 2004. We also provide support and information 
assistance for National Guard and Reserves called up for 
service in Iraq or Afghanistan and their families. 

The Director and the Assistant to the Director, Georgia 
Gadbois, advocate for veterans on issues at the local, 
state and federal level, interact with elected and 
appointed officials on issues, and work with local 
organizations in serving the community. Key state 
legislation passed in 2004 included an expanded definition 
of a veteran to include cold war veterans, and special 
license plates for veterans in receipt of the Distinguished 
Flying Cross. Federal legislation supported and passed 
included a significant increase in the Department of 
Veteran's Affairs budget, and the concurrent receipt of 
military retirement pay and VA disability pay. 



103 



The Eastern Essex District is composed of the Towns of 
Essex, Georgetown, Hamilton, Ipswich, Rowley, West Newbury 
and Wenham. A Board of Directors consisting of one 
selectman (or designee) from each town maintains oversight 
Mr. James Foley is the Ipswich member of the Board of 
Directors . 



******** 



UTILITIES DEPARTMENT - Timothy Henry - Director 

ELECTRIC DIVISION 

Raymond R. Shockey - Manager 

The electric industry remains in a volatile phase with 
continuing discussion and argument regarding controversial 
issues such as Regional Transmission Organizations, forward 
market participation and Locational Installed Capacity 
pricing. These issues will continue to alter the method of 
pricing and distributing electricity through New England 
and other regions of the country. The results will enter 
into the discussions the department is having regarding the 
future of the Ipswich power plant. Power costs continue to 
rise as a result of country-wide increases in fuel costs. 

Work at our High Street substation continues and is now 
scheduled for completion during the first half of 2005. 

In addition, construction of electric lines to the New 
England BioLabs project on Fellows Road is complete. We are 
anticipating a significant increase in revenue due to the 
operations of our three latest industrial/commercial 
customers: Kortec, Turner Hill and BioLabs. 

The data-collection portion of our wind-power project is 
complete and confirms the feasibility of installing a wind 
turbine on town property at the end of Town Farm Road. The 
next steps will involve an economic study and understanding 
permitting issues. 

Fiscal Year 2004 also saw the implementation of several 
customer service initiatives including rebates for energy- 
efficient appliances and the sales of low-cost, high- 
quality surge protection devices for electronic device 
protection. 



104 



Kilowatt-hour sales increased 4.8% over 2003 and should 
increase again in 2005 with the full operation of our new 
industrial customers and the addition of planned 
residential construction. 

2003 sales: 92,902,000 [actual] 

2004 sales: 97,320,000 [estimate] 




Photo courtesy of Kim Martineau 
******** 

WATER DIVISION 

Tim Henry - Manager 

A wet summer combined with continued water conservation measures resul 
in the second lowest total amount of water pumped in 15 years. Water 
conservation measures include a seasonal rate structure, which was sta 
in 2003, as well as a system wide leak detection program, which has be 
very helpful in detecting sub surface leaks. 

Painting of the exterior of the Plover Hill Water Tank was completed i 
Spring by Amex Painting, Inc. at a cost of $350,000. 



105 







During the summer, a new 12 -inch cement lined ductile iron 
water main was installed along County Road from Poplar 
Street to Lakemans Lane, by Granese and Sons Contractors at 
a cost of $1,071,000. This new main replaces an old (100 
year) 8 -inch cast iron main which had many problems over 
the past few years . 

New Mains 

5200' of 12" CLDI replaced 8" CI on County Road. 

No new extensions to the water system in 2004. 



2004 

New Domestic Services 

Hydrants Installed 

Hydrants Replaced 

New Water Mains Installed 

Total Length of Mains (ft) 



(ft) 



39 


21 



494,235 



Water Services 

Metered Services 
Unmetered Services 



4548 

79 Fire Lines 



Water Usage (Million Gallons) 

Reservoirs (Dow and Bull Brook) 204 

Brown's Well 79 

Essex Road Well 2 9 

Fellows Road Well 43 

Mile Lane Well 21 

Winthrop Wells 23 



Total Water Usage (MG) 



399 



106 



******** 



WATER FILTRATION PLANT 

Joyce S. Kippen, Superintendent 

The Town of Ipswich Water Filtration Plant is pleased to 
submit the following report: 

The Filtration Plant has completed several Capital 
Projects; a new high lift, finished water pump, and a 
state-of-the art chlorine dioxide unit have been installed 

Because of the high metal and organic species in the water 
supply reservoirs and the potential for Trihalomethane 
formation in the treated water, chlorine dioxide is used. 
It is a powerful oxidizer and is elemental chlorine free; 
thus, Trihalomethanes are not formed. The state-of-the art 
unit, processed by a fully automated computer logic panel, 
is able to achieve high chemical conversion efficiencies 
without undesirable by-products such as in the old 
processes. Consequently, the metals have been oxidized and 
the Trihalomethanes have been minimized. 

The SCADA system, (System Control and Data Acquisition) 
which monitors and operates the wells and treatment plant 
functions has been upgraded in various areas . 

As in the past, the water quality has met or surpassed all 
state requirements. Please remember to conserve our water 
supply. 



******** 

WASTEWATER TREATMENT PLANT 

John A. Quigley, Jr., Superintendent 

We have been more aggressive in trying to locate 
infiltration problems. We have been measuring flows in 
particular areas to locate problem areas. Then we have a 
contractor come into Town and TV our lines and make repairs 
as they are located. We have had several manholes repaired 
to date and will continue to work in this area. 



107 



For the year 2004, we treated 339.4 million gallons of 
wastewater. We took 2,455,100 gallons of septage. 
We processed 2,472.8 cu. yds. of bio-solids. 
We recorded 52.56 inches of rain. 

The following violations occurred in 2004: 






February 04 


2 


(2) copper 


March 04 


1 


(1) fecal conform 


April 04 


13 


(7) fecal coliform (4) ph (2) nitrogen 


May 04 


1 


(i) P h 


July 04 


7 


(6) fecal coliform (1) geo 


August 04 


6 


(5) fecal coliform (1) geo 


September 04 


14 


(13) fecal coliform (1) geo 


October 04 


11 


(11) fecal coliform (l)geo 


November 04 


7 


(7) fecal coliform (1) geo 


December 04 


7 


(6) fecal colifonn (1) geo 
******** 


FINANCE DIRECTORATE - 


- Rita M. Negri, Finance Director 



ACCOUNTING OFFICE 

Rita M. Negri - Town Accountant 

The Town Accountant's Office consists of two full-time 
staff and a full-time Town Accountant who also serves as 
Finance Director. The Accounting Department is 
responsible for processing the payroll for all employees, 
processing invoices for vendor payments, and preparing all 
W-2's and 1099' s at year-end in accordance with IRS 
regulations. 

The Town Accountant's Office maintains all of the 
accounting records for the Town's revenues and' 
expenditures, ensures that reconciliations are performed 
between applicable Town departments, assists in providing 
information on benefits available to employees, and 
oversees the operation of the Town' s financial computer 
system. 

The Town Accountant also coordinates the annual independent 
audit of the Town's financial statements that was last 
completed by August 25, 2004, for the year ended June 30, 
2004. The financial results for fiscal year 2004 were good. 
This was due to good collections on receivables, and 
responsible spending of appropriations. 



108 



Free Cash for fiscal year 2004 was certified by the 
Massachusetts Department of Revenue, Division of Local 
Services in October 2004 in the amount of $692,485. 

********* 

TREASURER/COLLECTOR 

Kevin A. Merz, Treasurer/Collector 

The Treasurer/Collector is responsible for the investing of 
all Town funds and the billing and collecting of Real 
Estate taxes, Personal Property taxes, Motor Vehicle and 
Boat Excise taxes. The Treasurer/Collector's office is also 
responsible for all municipal borrowings, balancing cash 
and accounts receivable with the Town Accountant, selling 
beach stickers, processing Municipal Lien Certificates and 
continuing collection efforts of properties in Tax Title. 

The office welcomed our new Treasurer/Collector, Kevin A. 
Merz, in March. His coming has caused a whirlwind of 
activity here in the office. Policies and procedures have 
been streamlined, new banking relationships have emerged to 
increase interest rates and decrease monthly fees, and 
manual ledgers have been replaced by computer programs. A 
lockbox has been implemented in the collection of all bills 
to increase posting accuracy and have money deposited in 
the bank on the same day. 

With all the activity and changes, the staff has stepped up 
and maintained positive attitudes. A big thanks goes out 
to Susan LeMieux, Corinna Warner and Kathy Hough for a 
marvelous job done during this transitional period in 
2004. Additional thanks go to Carol Poirier and Margaret 
Whittier for their assistance in our office with special 
projects. 

******** 

ASSESSORS OFFICE 

Frank J. Ragonese, Chief Assessor 

The total valuation of Real Estate and Personal Property 
January 1, 2004, was $2,252,254,870. 



109 



The valuation of the Town by Class is 











$ 






% 


Class 


I 


Residential 2 


f 054 


018, 


227 


91 


.1983 


Class 


II 


Open Space 




- 






- 


Class 


III 


Commercial 


94 


850, 


750 


4 


.2114 


Class 


IV 


Industrial 


88 


195, 


900 


3 


9159 






Personal Property 


15 


189, 


993 





6744 






Total : $2 


252, 


254, 


870 


100 


00% 



The Tax Rate for Fiscal Year 2005 was $9.35 per thousand 
for all property classes. 

■*•*•*****■* 

TOWN CLERK 

ELECTIONS ADMINISTRATOR 

Frances A. Richards, CMC 

It was an extremely busy year for the Town Clerk' s office 
this year with two primaries, two election and two town 
meetings. The Town Clerk's office is responsible for local 
and state elections, recording and certification of all 
official actions from town meetings, census and voter 
registration, maintenance and issuance of vital records, 
processing and issuing licenses and permits approved by the 
Board of Selectmen and various other licenses including dog, 
shellfish, sporting and marriage licenses. 

Our office also serves as a general information center to the 
public. Numerous requests for certifid copies of vital 
records, general information about the Town and its 
activities, genealogical and historical information, business 
and legal decisions by Town boards and demographic statistics 
are received over the counter, through the mail, by email 
and by telephone. The services and demands on the Town 
Clerk's office have tripled, yet staffing has remained the 
same as it was twenty-five years ago. 

The Town Clerk' s staff consists of the Town Clerk and 
Assistant Town Clerk Elise "Lee" Graves. Thanks b Lee for 
her outstanding dedication and effort which makes it possible 
to run this office with two people. We are very fortunate to 
have two dedicated volunteers who assist us with projects 
that we would never have time to complete. Special thanks to 
our volunteers: Janet Trask and Isobel Coulombe. 



110 




Volunteer Rita Trask and 
Photo courtesy < 



Town Clerk Fran. Richards 
>f Jane Spell man 



Population Statistics from the Resident List as of June 1, 2004 



Ages 
Ages 6 
Ages 12 
Ages 15 
Ages 19 
Ages 26 



5 595 

11 951 

14 515 

18 742 

25 1,014 

35 1,162 



Ages 36- 45 2,080 

Ages 46- 55 2,417 

Ages 56 - 65 . .1,863 

Ages 66- 75 1,033 

Ages 76- 100 1,088 



Total Population as June 1 st 13,460 - Number of households - 
5,313 

Comparative Vital Statistics recorded in the past three year s 



Births 
Deaths 
Marriages 



2002 
118 
94 
78 



2003 
18 
117 
78 



2004 
116 
108 
74 



There were 58 females and 58 males born to Ipswich 
residents in 2004. Of the total number of deaths recorded 
(57 females, 51 males), 104 were residents. On May 17, 
2004, same-sex marriage became legal in Massachusetts. Of 
the 74 marriages recorded in Ipswich, 18 were same-sex 
marriages . 



Ill 



Revenue Report for the Town Clerk's Office- 2004 

Antiques & Old Metals Licenses $ 180.00 

Automatic Amusement Licenses 1 , 150 . 00 

Beer & Wine Licenses 7,800.00 

By-Laws, Maps Sold 1,435.00 

Class I, II, III Licenses 1,400.00 

Certified Copy Fees 3 , 702 . 10 

Common Victuallers Licenses 4,500.00 

Dog Licenses 21,550.00 

Flammables Permits 700.00 

Kayak License 100.00 

Liquor Licenses (All Alcoholic) 41350.00 

Marriage Licenses 1 , 925 . 00 

One -Day All Alcoholic Licenses 1,120.00 

One-Day Beer & Wine Licenses 160 . 00 

Raffle Permits 100.00 

Recording Fees 3 , 050 . 78 

Seasonal All Alcoholic Licenses 6,525.00 

Shellfish Permits 48,860.00 

Sporting Licenses 5 , 574 . 75 

Sporting Fees to the Town 261.55 

Street Lists Sold 1,380 . 00 

Sunday Entertainment Licenses 2,830.00 

Weekday Entertainment Licenses 1, 300 .00 

Total $ 156,954.18 

Dog Licenses 

A total of 1,822 dogs were licensed in Ipswich for 2004. As 
of December 31 st ' 2004, ninety dog owners refused to license 
their dogs and were turned over to the court by the Animal 
Control Division of the Public Safety Department. Animal 
Control Officers for 2004 were Harry Leno and Dyan Katz. 

My sincere thanks to Dr. Helen Noble, her staff and Anmal 
Control Officer Harry Leno for conducting a Special Rabies 
Clinic at the Highway Garage on February 2f fc so dogs could 
get their rabies shots before the March 3l fc licensing 
deadline. 












112 



Shellfish Licenses & Permits 



Resident Yearly- 
Resident Family 
Resident Commercial 
Over 70 Free Commercial 
Over 60 Free Recreational 
Non-Resident Yearly 
Non-Resident Daily 
Eagle Hill Stickers 



2002 



2003 



2004 



83 


67 


93 


155 


122 


144 


119 


79 


70 





14 


14 


21 


13 


31 


90 


80 


97 


22 


7 


11 



Revenue from sales of all 2004 shellfish licenses $48,860.00 

Sporting Licenses - 2004 

Resident Fishing 76 

Resident Fishing Handicapped (free) 14 

Non-Resident Fishing 1 

Resident Hunting 51 

Non-Resident Hunting 3 

Resident Sporting 34 

Resident Sporting Over 70 (free) 33 

Trapping 1 

Archery Stamps 43 

Primitive Firearms Stamps 38 

Waterfowl Stamps 45 

Wildlands Conservation Stamps 166 

Total 505 

Revenue sent in to Division of Fisheries & Wildlife $5,574.7 5 

******** 

ELECTIONS AND REGISTRATIONS 

Board of Registrars 

Phillip F. Grenier, Chairman 

Orville M. Giddings 

Robert M. Stone 

Frances A. Richards, Clerk 

It was an extremely busy year with two primaries, two 
elections and two town meetings. The primaries and elections 
were held at the YMCA and the town metings were held at the 
Performing Arts Center at the Middle/High School. Sincere 
thanks to the Board of Registrars, the Election Officials, 
Jim Graff urn and the workers at the Cemetery Department, the 
staff at the YMCA, Cheryl Forster and the custodians a the 



113 



High School/Middle School and my son Scott for all their help 
with the election at the YMCA and the town meetings at the 
Performing Arts Center. 



The following served as Election Officials in 2004: Andrew 
Agapow, Bruce Bryant, Armand Brouillette, E>n Graves, John 
Meers, Laurien Levesque, Charles McKenzie, Theresa Greaney, 
Dorothy Levesque, Mary Cunningham, Carolyn Navarro, Jane 
Janvrin, Ruth Paulitz, Virginia Player, Anne Matous, Diana 
Comeau, Dorcas Rice, Marcia Inman, Irene Brouillette, 
Virginia Cbmeau, Isobel Coulombe, Moira McLaughlin, James 
Lahar, Marlene Shannon, Ann Fessenden, Margaret Whittier, 
Janet Trask, Judith Fudge, Florence Lamanski, Mary Graves, 
Alice Stasiak, Renata Gilmore, Nancy Damon, Brenda Graff urn, 
Jeanne Parker, Carol Poirier, timet Sklarz, and Peter 
Lampropoulos . 

Total Residents All Precincts 13,701 as of December 31, 2004 






Precinct 


1 


3, 


,248 


Precinct 


2 


3, 


,378 


Precinct 


3 


3; 


,586 


Precinct 


4 


3, 


,489 



Elections & Town Meetings for 2004 

March 2, 2004 - Presidential Primary with 1,921 votes cast - 
1,507 Democrats, 409 Republicans, 3 Libertarians 
& 2 Green Rainbow - 22% of the total 8,640 
voters 

April 5, 2004 - Annual Town Meeting with 26 articles in the 
warrant - 283 voters attending 

April 13, 2004 - Annual Town Election with 2,070 votes cast 

24% of the total 8,640 voters 

Sept. 14, 2004 - State Primary with 615 votes cast - 

315 Democrats, 300 Republicans- 
6.88% of the total 8,939 voters 

Oct. 18, 2004 - Special Town Meeting with 26 articles in 

the warrant - 236 voters attending 

Nov. 2, 2004 - State Election with 7,806 votes cast - 
83.3% of the total 9,369 voters 



114 






Registered Voters as of December 31, 2004 - 9,390 

PREC. DEMOCRAT REPUBLICAN LIBERTARIAN GREEN- UN-ENROLLED TOTAL 











RAINBOW 






1 


490 


370 


9 





1,302 


2,711 


2 


562 


374 


11 


1 


1,487 


2,435 


3 


371 


441 


20 


1 


1,582 


2,415 


4 


463 


367 


15 





1,524 


2,369 


Totals 


1,886 


1,552 


55 


2 


5,895 


9,390 



Of the 1,368 new voters registered in 2004, 563 registrations 
were received by mail, 511 registered in the office, 15 at 
state agencies, 3 military and 276 at the Registry of Motor 
Vehicles. 



******** 



MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS 

Greg Parachojuk, MIS Director 

The MIS Department is charged with the ongoing mission to 
develop, enhance and support the Town's computing and 
telecommunications infrastructure, and to provide the 
systems and services necessary for the Town's departments 
and users to fulfill their stated goals and objectives. 

Many updates were implemented in hardware and software to 
increase productivity, security and reliability of systems. 
SPAM and Viruses are also increasingly harder to control 
and manage . 

Our financial system transition from ACCESS to MUNIS was 
finally completed by the end of 2004. 

The municipal broadband data communications link or INET 
was extremely troublesome and caused many interruptions for 
Town, Utility, and School users. Outdated equipment and 
infrastructure are the main causes of failure. Workarounds 
are being implemented for the most critical locations until 
a replacement plan is devised. 

Please visit the Town's web site at 

http: //www. town. ipswich.ma .us to get the latest information 
on scheduled events, meetings and minutes. Property 
assessment data is now available online; and several forms 
from many departments are available for download. 



115 



******** 



PURCHASING/BUDGET/RISK MANAGEMENT 

Jane H. Spellman 
Assistant Purchasing Agent 
Risk Management Coordinator 
Safety Coordinator 

The Purchasing Office employee oversees and monitors all 
municipal side Town departments procurements with the 
exception of the day to day expenditures of the Electric 
Department, and puts out to bid expenditures in excess of 
$25,000 for goods and services and bids construction 
contracts for all departments except the School Department 
in accordance with Massachusetts General Laws. 

In addition to present contract renewals, the following 
were advertised, put out to bid, bids received with 
contracts awarded: Engineering Services for Dow Brook 
Conservation Area; Engineering Services for Various 
Projects for DPW; Installation of Vehicle Exhaust System in 
the Central Fire Station; Cleaning, Redeveloping & Repairs 
to Fellows Road Well; Removal /Replacement of Activated 
Carbon; Construction Equipment Rental; Lease for Hall- 
Haskell House; County Road Water Main Project; Purchase of 
One -ton 4X4 Dump Truck for the Cemetery Dept; Masonry 
Repairs to Central Fire Station; Structural Repairs to the 
Central Fire Station; High Street Substation #4 
Construction; Resurfacing Various Roads Contract; 
Reconstruction of Various Roads Contract; Cleaning Catch 
Basins; Paint and Painting Streetlines; Chemical Consortium 
Contracts; Engineering Services related to DEP Notice of 
Non-Compliance for WTP; Engineering Services related to 
Green Street, Summer Street Water System; Snow Plowing 
Contracts. 

The Purchasing Office oversaw all Workers Compensation 
long-term cases and reported all Town and School employee 
injuries. All property and casualty insurance claims 
received were reported to the Town's insurance carrier. 
Insurance renewals were processed, policies received, and 
vehicle, equipment, and computer inventories maintained. 

The Purchasing Office was also responsible for editing, 
copying, collating and distributing 25 budget copies while 
meeting the set deadline. Budget details with adopted 






116 



figures for FY06 Budget will be inputted and distributed to 
Departments by this office after the Annual Town Meeting. 

The Purchasing Office has been given responsibility for the 
recording of Fixed Assets under the mandate of GASB 
Statement 34 and will be continuing to undertake this 
monumental task as well as maintaining inventory of Town 
owned property. The process is ongoing. 

This office established a Safety Committee made up of Town 
employees this year. The committee has a membership of 
fifteen employees representative of all departments in the 
Town. An employee safety handbook is being compiled and 
will be distributed in 2005. A Safety Concern and 
Suggesting form was established and made available for 
employees and the public to use to make known observed 
safety concerns. The form is forwarded to department 
heads for investigation and resolution if warranted. These 
are just initial steps in making our workplace safer and 
employees more aware of safety precautions. 

The Purchasing Office is also responsible for the 
compiling, editing, printing and distribution of this 
Annual Town Report . 



******** 



IPSWICH PUBLIC LIBRARY 

Victor Dyer, Director 

Collections : New books added: 3,642 (Adult & Young Adult) 
1,617 (Children). New media added: 516 (Adult & Young 
Adult) 283 (Children) . Audio-Visual collections enhanced 
with funds provided by the Friends of the IPL. Adult and 
children's recreation, hobbies and reference collections 
were weeded. The library developed five book club kits for 
use within he MVLC system. New reference databases added in 
2004 included History Reference Center and New Book of 
Popular Science. 

Technology : Three new PC's were installed in the Children's 
Room. Fall Town Meeting approved $10,800 for the purchase of 
seven replacement PC's for circulation desks and public use. 
12,000+ patrons signed up to use the Internet PC's and 19,000+ 
hits were recorded on the library's web site in 2004. Through 
the generosity of EBSCO Publishing and Balsam Technologies, 
Inc., the library now offers to patrons wireless Internet 



117 



connectivity. The library's website 

( www. town. ipssich. ma. us/library ) was updated continuously with 
new information. Assistant Library Director Genevieve Picard 
added a genealogical section. 

Staff : Mary Lou Murphy, Senior Library Technician- 
Circulation, retired on June 30 th after 27 years of service. 
Susanne Simmons was promoted to fill the vacant position. 
Joining the staff were Andre Owen as Page and Betsy Johnson 
as Library Aide in the Children's Room and Beth Uhring as 
Library Technician-Circulation. Former Library Director 
Eleanor "Penny'' Gaunt died in San Diego, California on July 
10, 2004. 

Volunteers : This year Volunteers donated over 1,400 hours 
shelving books, preparing materials, assisting with 
children's programs, etc. The Town and Country Garden Club 
helped maintain the library grounds, while the Ipswich 
Garden Club decorated the library for the holidays. Dorcas 
Rice decorated the mantel in the Rogers Room for the 
holiday season. 

Board of Trustees : The Board approved updates of four job 
descriptions and successfully negotiated an agreement in 
Ascension Church for a right of way to the rear of the 
library to provide access to a proposed staff parking area. 
SEA Group in Cambridge was asked to prepare plans for this 
parking area. The Trustees investigated the investment 
practices of other libraries and interviewed three 
financial institutions as possible library trust funds 
managers. The Board authorized the cleaning and reframing 
of the 'Master Heard' portrait. Robert Weatherall was 
elected Treasurer. 

Plan of Service : The Board of Trustees approved the new 
'Plan of Service 2004-2008' in January. Some of the 
activities accomplished in 2004 include a public reception 
to celebrate the 135 th anniversary of the founding of the 
library; orientation to the library by Paula Grillo, 
Reference and Young Adult Librarian, for all 6 th grade 
students; addition of more local newspapers and 14 new 
periodical titles; improvements in the Young Adult Area. 

Public Relations : The library produced two issues of its 
newsletter in 2004. As part of the 'Ipswich Reads... One 
Book!' program, the library sent out over 7,000 ballots 
with the December Utilities Department bills. 



118 




Book chosen for town -wide reaclii 



Building : Leaks developed in several areas of the older 
parts of the library building. Corliss Bros, donated a 
crabapple tree, which was planted near the North wall. The 
large lilac bush was moved to a new location. 

Friends : The Friends supported the library this year with 
funds for new materials, children's programs & supplies. 
They also under wrote the 135 th anniversary tea and the 
printing of the new 'Plan of Service' . The Friends 
sponsored the annual volunteers breakfast, purchased a 
framed antique map of Ipswich, and replaced the 
deteriorated urns with new cast iron urns. 

Bequests & Gifts : Donations were received in memory of Mary 
L. Bamford, Edwin R. Wile, Margaret Doucet (a library 
volunteer for many years) , Eleanor Gaunt (former Library 
Director) , Barbara Carpenter, Kingsley Bishop and Kevin 
McCarron. Sara Livermore, Timothy Collins and Fusion 
Concepts, Inc. also made donations. The Trustees received a 
bequest from the Jeannette M. Richards Trust. The Boston 
Foundation made a donation to the Markos Hellenic Fund. 
Mrs. John Chamberlain donated the Richard Morrell Staigg 
(1817-1881) 'Portrait of Master Heard'. 

Programs : The Children's Dept . offered 151 programs with 
3,392 children participating. The ESL program matched 27 
tutors with students in 2004. Thirteen new tutors were 
trained in two training sessions. Reference Librarian Paula 
Grillo hosted two cultural evenings with 3 9 participants 
from the ESL program. Carla Panciera taught three writing 
workshops for adults. 



119 



Circulation : Total circulation in 2004 was 122,700 items. 
The library borrowed 9,144 items for patrons through 
interlibrary loan. 

Grants : The library received a $7,500 A 0n the Same Page' 
grant federally funded with LSTA funds through the 
Massachusetts Board of Library Commissioners. The library 
also received an $1,800 grant from the Coburn Charitable 
Society for the purchase of Large Print and audiovisual 
materials . 

Archives : Volunteer Howard Fosdick continued to inventory 
the manuscripts given to the Archives Committee. The 
Archives Committee met in November to establish ownership 
of Archives Committee and other donations. 

******** 
SCHOOL DEPARTMENT Richard L. Korb, Superintendent 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Joan Arsenault, Chair 

As the members of the Ipswich School Committee reflect upon 
the events of the past year, we proudly acknowledge and 
celebrate each of the district's outstanding academic, 
athletic, and cultural achievements while at the same time 
being ever mindful of the growing concern over dwindling 
budget dollars and the potentially catastrophic impact on 
existing programs, personnel, and children. 

In a year where MCAS scores improved dramatically in each 
of our schools, we were again plagued by rising special 
education costs and unanticipated increases in health 
insurance premiums for our employees. In a year where 
Ipswich High School continued to receive state and national 
recognition for the way in which staff and administration 
responded to the ambitious expectations of President Bush's 
"No Child Left Behind" mandate, our dependence on outside 
funding sources to keep our school running exceeded 
$750,000. In a year where our early intervention 
programs, our commitment to full inclusion of all students 
irrespective of learning style or need, and a creative and 
innovative use of special education faculty and schedule at 
the Ipswich Middle School, provided us with more efficient, 
cost effective ways of delivering appropriate services and 
resources geared specifically to meet the individual needs 



120 



of every learner, we saw diminishing returns in Chapter 70 
moneys which further hindered our ability to spend our 
appropriated budget on its intended uses. In a year where 
EBSCO, ICE (Ipswich Citizens for Education) , and Harry 
Lampropoulos, representative for Friends of Ipswich 
Athletics, were all recognized for their fundraising 
efforts in support of our schools by the Massachusetts 
Association of School Committees, their frequent attendance 
at our meetings to present desperately needed dollars, 
served as painful reminders of our ever-growing need to 
rely on private donations and corporate contributions to 
pay our bills. In a year where many of our athletes and 
athletic teams were honored for their individual 
accomplishments and state tournament participation, sub- 
varsity teams survived solely on the generosity and 
involvement of private citizens. In a year where major 
renovations and building repairs were made at our 
elementary schools, escalating utility and transportation 
costs again limited access to funds designated for programs 
and personnel . 

We continued to move forward in our efforts to rewrite the 
Feoffees of the Grammar School trust. In collaboration 
with legal counsel, members of the Feoffees Town Committee, 
the current Feoffees, and representatives of the other town 
boards, the School Committee is determined to bring this 
daunting task to fruition in the very near future. We are 
grateful to everyone who has contributed time, energy, and 
expertise throughout what has been a very lengthy process. 
Ultimately, we look for a document that provides the 
necessary direction and guidance to those responsible for 
securing funds for the enhancement and enrichment of our 
quality educational programs. 

The School Committee would once again like to extend our 
appreciation to Representative Brad Hill and Senator Bruce 
Tarr for their unwavering support in advocating for our 
children and their right to a quality education in our 
district's classrooms. Their efforts on our behalf have 
been well documented, and we will continue to rely and 
depend on their commitment and diligence in pursuing any 
and all monetary assistance at the state level. 

Finally, despite the uncertainty of our financial future, 
the School Committee remains focused and dedicated in our 
resolve to provide for excellence in education for all 
children. Despite the plethora of hardships and obligatory 



121 



reductions realized through imposed fiscal restraint, we 
commend the administrators, teachers, support staff, and 
students for the many wondrous fetes they continue to 
accomplish. You remain our greatest asset and a credit to 
the community. 



******** 



SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 

Richard L. Korb 

The FY05 school year has indeed been a unique one filled 
with opportunities, rewards and challenges. The overriding 
issue continues to be the fiscal problems that h ave plagued 
the State and the community, thus impacting the School 
District's ability to deliver the educational services it 
feels are necessary to maintain the quality educational 
programs this community expects and deserves. 

As is the case every year, the School Committee and I set 
goals to guide us toward our vision. This year's are as 
follows : 

I . Develop a District-wide Budget that Reflects the 
Educational and Operational Priorities of the School 
System 

Obj ectives/Strategies 

□ Restore funding to those areas of our budget that 
enhance student learning including professional 
development . 

D Appropriately fund the technology needs of the 
district . 

□ Establish a budget priority to provide funding to 
restore those positions that were eliminated or 
reduced in recent budgets. 

□ Begin to reduce the reliance on outside funding 
over the next three to five years. 

II . Preserve and Enhance the "District-wide Culture" 
Obj ectives/Strategies 



122 



D Continue to promote collaboration and 
communication throughout the system. 

D Continue to strengthen the working relationships 
between the School Committee, Administration and 
Staff. 

G Continue to provide opportunities within our 

"site-based model" to develop leaders and support 
and nurture an atmosphere of high expectations 
and accountability. 

D Work collaboratively with the Ipswich Teachers 
Association to enhance and support our 
mentor/mentee program to assistant in attracting 
and in retaining quality staff. 

D Build a mutually cooperative and productive 
relationship with all town boards'. 

Ill . Encourage the Development and Modeling of "Best 
Practices" 

Obj ectives/Strategies 

□ Establish and support the new district -wide 

initiative addressing physical education, health 
and wellness curricular issues. Resources will 
be made available to allow for a total curriculum 
assessment. 

D Support the newly created district -wide 
Nutritional Advisory Subcommittee as it 
undertakes a comprehensive review of our Food 
Services Program, including healthy eating, 
nutrition and cost. 

D Provide support to continue the enhancement of 
our district wide literacy initiatives. 

D Continue to support the educational atmosphere 
that encourages teachers to be creative and 
innovative in their approach to pedagogy and 
provides opportunities for them to apply for 
grant funding to implement these new initiatives. 



123 



IV. Successfully complete the High School Accreditation 
Study as well as our new district wide comprehensive 
coordinated program review 

Obj ectives/Strategies 

□ Provide the necessary time and resources to our 
staff to meet the requirements of these two 
critical mandates. 

D Work cooperatively with those state agencies to 
insure that follow up recommendations are 
addressed. 

While working toward accomplishing these goals, the 
financial constraints of the budget make full achievement 
of these goals extremely difficult. 

Our staff continues to adopt the philosophy that we must 
always be on a track of continuous improvement . That 
attitude is reflected in the ongoing evaluation of programs 
that occur each year. 

Our Early Childhood "Birth to Age Three" Program continues 
to flourish, serving over 500 families in the community. 

This year, once again, our MCAS test scores placed us far 
above the State average in over 90% of the categories. Our 
Middle School and High School scores were once again 
impressive and our Elementary scores were improved over 
last year. We will continue to strive to improve our test 
scores and have teams of professional educators in place 
analyzing test results and providing valuable analysis, 
which will lead to adjustments in our curriculum to assure 
it is aligned with the State Frameworks. 

The various subcommittees of the School Committee worked 
diligently in a number of areas, including curriculum, 
policy development, technology, athletics and 
communications . 

Some of the highlights of the FY05 school year include the 
continuation of the Elementary Capital Improvements 
Project, addressing a number of "infrastructure" issues 
such as new windows and doors at Doyon, as well as lighting 
upgrades at Winthrop and Doyon. 



124 



Ipswich High School was again recognized for outstanding 
advancement by being nominated by the Massachusetts 
Commissioner of Education for a national award and 
recognition for exceeding the standards of No Child Left 
Behind. 

The 2004-2005 school year also marked the third year of 
implementing our District Strategic Planning document. 
Each school has identified the current initiatives and 
Action Plans that we have in place in keeping with the 
planned goals of: 1) student achievement; 2) instructional 
practices; 3) operational priorities; and 4) communication 
practices. It is our hope and goal that this plan will 
continue to guide us and direct us over the next two to 
three years . 

The Ipswich School System is a leader across the nation in 
the area of technology integration across the curriculum. 
Not only has Boston College recognized Ipswich to be one of 
the top five school districts in the Commonwealth when it 
comes to utilization and implementation of technology into 
the curriculum, we also were recognized by the nation of 
Barbados as a leader in technology integration, so much so 
that they sent a team of educators from their Ministry of 
Education to visit Ipswich and model a similar approach for 
their country. We are proud to feature numerous 21st 
Century Classrooms within our school district that are 
designed to foster students who take responsibility for 
their own learning in an application-based environment 
committed to high expectations. Within this information- 
rich, technology-enhanced learning environment, the teacher 
creates a challenging project -centered, interdisciplinary 
classroom. The ultimate goal within the 21st Century 
Classroom is that students will become self-directed 
learners who strive toward continuous improvement through 
reflection and self -assessment; collaborative learners who 
take responsibility for their own role in a group; and 
proficient learners who design and present projects and 
apply the required knowledge appropriately. 

In conclusion, I want to express my sincere appreciation to 
the citizens and parents of Ipswich who have given so 
generously in supporting quality education for all 
children. Support staff, teachers, administrators, 
parents, students and citizens working in partnership with 
each other will move this District forward in a culture of 
continuous improvement and excellence. 



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********* 



IPSWICH HIGH SCHOOL 

Barry Cahill, Principal 

It is my pleasure to write to you concerning Ipswich High 
School during the year 2004. 

This year began on a very positive note when we were 
selected by the Massachusetts Department of Education as a 
Compass School. Of the ten schools awarded this honor, 
only four were high schools. The Compass School 
designation recognizes our academic success based on very 
high scores on the MCAS (Massachusetts Comprehensive 
Assessment System) test in English Language Arts and 
Mathematics. Over 80% of our students scored at the two 
highest levels of Advanced and Proficient. Our passing 
rate and overall scores place us near the top of all high 
schools in Massachusetts. 

Our academic program expanded as we added elective courses 
in history, science and art. These courses expanded our 
already rich core curriculum to areas attracting great 
student interest. Our participation in Virtual High 
School, an on-line series of courses in specialty areas, 
attracted great student interest . Our program provides 
opportunities for students in music, art, theater and 
technical education. 

Our graduates continue to experience great success. A 
record amount of local and outside scholarships were 
awarded to a very deserving class of 2004. A total of 88% 
of our graduating seniors were accepted at two or four year 
colleges. The most outstanding schools in the country have 
welcomed our students. Members of the class of 2004 were 
accepted at Harvard, Duke, M.I.T., Boston College, Holy 
Cross, Hamilton College and many other fine universities 
and colleges. The top 20% of the class carried a G.P.A. 
greater than 3.82. 

Our athletic program continued its historic success with 
several championships. Our golf team won the Cape Ann 
League Division II Championship, eventually finishing in 
Third Place at the State Tournament. Our Boy's Soccer Team 
was the Cape Ann League Champion and made it to the MIAA 
Division III Quarterfinals. The Girl's Soccer Team 



126 



advanced to the Division III North Finals. Our Boy's 
Basketball Team was the Cape Ann League Champion and made 
it to the MIAA Division IV North Finals. 

In the area of Fine Arts, Ipswich High School hosted and 
participated in the Massachusetts High School Drama Guild 
Preliminary Festival. Our Jazz Ensemble won a Gold Medal 
at the regional level and a Silver Medal at the All-State 
Competition. Our Symphony Orchestra received a Bronze 
Medal at the MICCA Large Ensemble Festival while our select 
"Little Women" Quartet received a Silver Medal. From our 
Art program, two students were awarded Silver Keys in the 
Boston Globe Scholarship Competition. 




127 




Gerry Dolan, Music Director- 
Photos courtesy of high school senior Reeve Pierson 

Our faculty spent the year preparing for a 2005 
accreditation process. As a result of their efforts for 
the year, virtually all curriculum was rewritten, rubrics 
were added to all courses, and a new statement of mission 
and expectations was agreed to for students and faculty. 

We are grateful to members of the community who helped us 
bridge the financial gap of a budget that does not quite 
meet all our needs. A donation of $45,000 given 
anonymously helped us purchase new textbooks. Other 
donations helped with science equipment, drama and social 
studies purchases. We are very appreciative for this 
assistance plus all those who donated to the high school 
through I.C.E. (Ipswich Citizens for Education). Our 
athletic program survives through the generosity of the 
Friends of Ipswich Athletics, while the arts are 
financially assisted by IMADA. 



128 



******** 



IPSWICH MIDDLE SCHOOL 

Cheryl Forster, Principal 

I am pleased to be reporting to the citizens of Ipswich in 
my tenth year as principal of this dynamic and exciting 
school . We are now in the fifth year in our building 
enjoying the warm learning environment we have created here 
together. The school design has allowed us to get to know 
our students very quickly; and each grade has developed its 
own culture creating three distinct neighborhoods. The 
facility has allowed students and teachers to access state 
of the art technology as well as world-class art, music, 
and drama programs. Our students continue to learn "new 
basics" along with the old ones, as we find that both are 
truly important in today's world of work. 

Educating students has never been more challenging with the 
added mandated testing we now administer in all grades. 
Test results we received validated the good work being done 
in our classrooms by our teachers. MCAS testing is 
completed every spring and Ipswich continues to do well. 

Excellent middle schools strive to reach the all -important 
whole child. Each grade level specializes in exploratory 
and child centered topics that offer a variety of learning 
experiences and opportunities. At the Ipswich Middle 
School, we work in a "team" approach. Teaching blocks are 
longer for in-depth learning; technology is readily 
available; and class size is limited for maximum skill 
building. It is a cooperative venture. 

Middle School is a time of choices and contrasts. Whether 
it is the quiet solitude of our peaceful courtyard complete 
with koi fish, or the pandemonium in the gym created by our 
tiger mascot - there is something for everyone here at IMS. 

Students in grade 6 spend an intensive and focused week in 
the spring at an environmental camp, Ferry Beach in Saco, 
Maine. All of our sixth grade staff attend to form close 
bonds with the students. The outdoor marine curriculum is 
high interest, and many new friends and relationships are 
forged. 

Grade seven students spend four days in canoes on the 
Ipswich River, seeing first hand where their river begins 



129 



and ends. They canoe through miles of forest, wetlands and 
marsh, collecting data all the way. They finish their trip 
paddling from the town wharf to arrive at Hog Island. 




Grade eight students spend four days in early June in the 
Adirondack^ in upper state New York. A science focus helps 
prepare them for visits to chasms and caves as well as the 
impressive Olympic Training Facility in Lake Placid. It is 
a wonderful culminating experience for them as they leave 
Middle School. 

We continue to provide an after school homework program for 
all interested students and their families; and we 
understand the need for students to be busy and supervised 
after the last school bell rings. We offer many enriching 
programs to meet the interests of all types of children. 
Our drama, dance and music departments involve more than 
half of our student population. Student athletes 
participate in sports programs that teach skills, 
sportsmanship and wellness. At the peak of intramural 
basketball season, more than 250 students are involved. We 
offer golf, tennis, soccer, softball, volleyball, field 
hockey, basketball, art club, music programs, drama, a 
literary cafe and monthly dances We teach a course called 
"People Smarts" which focuses on interpersonal skills and 
multiple intelligences. A monthly "service" component has 
taken the form of food pantry and coat drives. We also 
participate in the annual "Walk for Hunger" where together 



130 



we walk an 8 -mile circuit around Great Neck and back to 
raise funds for the homeless shelters on the North Shore. 

We are proud to be part of such an innovative and exciting 
learning environment. Our outstanding professional faculty- 
works diligently to clarify our vision for education-that 
every child can learn. We are constantly finding new ways 
to reach and teach all children who come to our school-they 
are after all, the future of Ipswich. It is an exciting 
time to be working with young people. Our slogan is "making 
a difference starts here." We believe that, we love our 
work and we invite you to join us. 

******** 

PAUL F. DOYON MEMORIAL SCHOOL 

Kenneth B. Cooper, Ph.D. Principal 

This past year certainly presented its challenges, both 
fiscally and educationally; but the Doyon School Learning 
Community rose to the challenges and looking back the year 
was one of progress and accomplishment. 

Our primary academic goal this year was to strengthen our 
literacy program. A joint Doyon/Winthrop Reading 
Comprehension Committee was formed several years ago, and 
findings were presented to both faculties this past spring. 
The Committee's overall recommendation was to move towards 
a Balanced Literacy approach to instruction in reading and 
writing while adopting a "guided reading" approach to 
reading comprehension. To this end, the following steps 
were taken this past year in support of the recommendations 
of the Comprehension Committee: a) a minimum of two hours 
time for uninterrupted literacy instruction was built into 
each grades' schedule; b) we have partnered with the Center 
for Applied Child Development at Tufts University and are 
providing extensive professional development for all of our 
faculty grades PreK-5 with a focus on support for 
implementation of a balanced literacy instructional 
approach; c) we have adopted new reading assessments that 
can be administered several times a year to both keep track 
of a child's progress as well as to help us make 
instructional decisions; and d) we have begun to acquire a 
variety of instructional materials and resources we need to 
move forward in this direction. All in all, terrific 
progress has been made in a worthwhile and beneficial 
direction. 



131 



In other academic areas, we were very pleased with this 
year's MCAS math and science scores; and our Math Team made 
several recommendations to ensure that teachers have the 
latest equipment, software and other instructional 
materials to keep our program growing and strong. 

We continue to focus time, energy and resources to support 
positive character traits in our children. Our Character 
Development team has met regularly this year and has 
continued to support our "S.T.O.P." program ("Stop, Think, 
Options, Proceed) , with school wide assemblies and dramatic 
presentations over the intercom. The group's focus this 
year has been on anti-teasing and ant i -bullying. Our SLT 
(Student Leadership Team) is stronger than ever, with 
almost two thirds of grades four and five students 
participating. One SLT group has partnered with our local 
Rotary Club in a program called "Early Act." This past 
year also saw ongoing support for our Responsive Classroom 
approach; and once again, all new classroom teachers were 
trained in this method which helps to build a sense of 
community in the classroom. 

This was a "happy year" for our Doyon building which is now 
40 years old. This year we were able to replace tile in 
about half of the school, replaced all the remaining 
original doors, and have brand new windows in the 100 wing 
complete with screens. 

With the outstanding support of the Friends of Ipswich 
Elementary School we were able this year to acquire a 
mobile technology lab with more than 20 wireless laptops. 
To accomplish this, the FRIES raised and donated more than 
$30,000. Teachers can now wheel the lab into their rooms 
and each child can work on a laptop and can access our 
school network and other instructional resources without 
wired connections. The FRIES also sponsored numerous 
classroom and school wide enrichment programs, and were 
active volunteers in classrooms, the library, and during 
special events and projects including school picture day, 
kindergarten screening, the "Understanding Our Differences 
Program, " and Writers Week. The Ipswich Citizens for 
Education helped us to fund the Student Leadership Team 
(more than 90 members!) and also supported our literacy 
program. We also benefited this year from funds raised in 
the Elementary Golf Tournament and from several independent 
donations and gifts. To all of these groups, and to all of 



132 



the folks who contributed in any way, we extend our deepest 
appreciation and gratitude. 

On this, the occasion of my eighteenth annual report, I 
would like to extend a special thanks to the incredibly 
dedicated and talented faculty and staff of the Doyon 
School with whom it is a pleasure to work, and to the 
students of the Doyon School who invariably greet each day 
with a "Good Morning, " and a smile and help to keep the 
rest of us young -at- heart . As I tell the children each 
Monday, we are all in this together. 



■***•****'*• 



WINTHROP SCHOOL 

Carolyn Davis, Principal 

An excitement for learning abounds at the Winthrop School 
as our students continue to be engaged in meaningful and 
thoughtful learning experiences. Our staff is to be 
commended for their dedication to our dynamic learning 
community and their commitment to high quality 
instructional models particularly in light of the recent 
challenges we have faced concerning reductions and 
elimination of programs and staff in our budget. 

This year, through outside funding sources (Golf Tournament 
proceeds and grants) , the Doyon and Winthrop Schools were 
able to work with Tufts University to customize workshops 
and coaching models for teachers to reflect the need for a 
comprehensive literacy model with a concentration on 
reading comprehension and effective reading strategies. 
This has been a productive and exciting venture and one 
that we hope to continue for a few more years. 

Our annual school -wide theme - Make a Difference - has 
unified the school with several challenges. Students and 
teachers chose a word to display outside their classrooms 
that guided them in a goal for the year. Another challenge 
was to perform an act of kindness for someone else in the 
school. As in past years, variety, creativity, and problem 
solving skills produced fascinating results with students 
presenting new ideas for making a difference in their 
community and throughout the world. 

This was another challenging budget year for us. The past 
three years of financial constraints continued to erode our 
budget to such an extent that there was a significant 



133 



negative impact on the educational opportunities available 
for our students. We lost: a classroom teacher, the 
librarian, a .5 speech and language assistant, the Extended 
Learning Program, a .5 teaching assistant, all before and 
after- school programs, all technology, and reductions in 
subject area budgets, equipment, supplies, software, 
library and classroom books, building improvement projects, 
etc. 

The Winthrop community is grateful for the major 
contributions of the following groups: 

The Friends of Ipswich Elementary Schools (FRIES) continued 
to fund special assemblies with outstanding cultural and 
educational programs as well as some of our playground 
needs. They also supported requests from teachers for 
technology, library books, and specialized materials. 

The Volunteers In School (VIS) program provided many 
volunteers to our school. Senior citizens, high school 
students, and parents assisted students by offering 
substantial learning experiences. 

Ipswich Citizens for Education (ICE) funded all of our 
after school programs and enabled Homework Club, Student 
Leadership Council, Art Club, Writing CluS, and Destination 
Imagination to continue servicing approximately 150 
students. 

Individual family donations allowed us to fund field trips, 
increase library books, and provide classroom reading books 
as well as many of our basic school supplies. 

We are a 500 student elementary school with approximately 
80 staff members located downtown with many unforeseen 
issues that surface every year regarding the health, 
safety, and welfare of our students. There have been many 
occasions when the Fire and Police Departments as well as 
the Department of Public Works assisted us with emergencies 
and unexpected dilemmas. Once again, we wish to thank all 
these town departments who worked so closely with us and 
ensured the safety of Winthrop students and their families. 

The support and ongoing partnership received from the Town 
of Ipswich is appreciated by the Winthrop staff, parents, 
and students. Please feel free to visit our school and 
witness firsthand the enthusiasm for learning generated 



134 



from our students. They are a remarkable group of children 
who are proud to showcase their school and their learning. 




Retired teacher Barbara Beaman 

is hanging students' artwork in the 

glass cases for the public to admire 

in the Town Hall. Come in and see 

ing displays . 
******** 



DEPARTMENT OF SPECIAL SERVICES 

Diana W. Minton, Director 

The Ipswich Public Schools' Department of Special Services 
was the subject of a Massachusetts Department of Education 
Program Review (Audit) . Our last review was in 2000. Our 
school system was visited by a multidisciplinary team of 
people for a weeklong review of our practices and 
procedures and adherence to federal and state guidelines. 
Areas reviewed included: Civil Rights (homeless education 
services) , Safe & Drug Free Schools, Title I, English 
Second Language, Nutrition and Special Education. The 
preparation was daunting due to the required documentation 
of regulatory compliance; however, we were able to 
successfully prepare the necessary material required by the 
review team. In cooperation with staff program managers 
and administration, the Department of Pupil Personnel 



135 



Services was given an excellent preliminary report card for 
which we collectively can be very proud. 

Continuing to take a pro-active approach to Special 
Education and its federal/state requirements, we will spend 
the next few months reviewing and incorporating the latest 
changes promulgated from the 2004 Re -Authorization of IDEA. 

We continue to write grants, present at state and national 
conferences, and collaborate with others to improve 
teaching and learning. 



******** 



IPSWICH HOUSING AUTHORITY 

Kenneth Blades, Chairman 

The Ipswich Housing Authority participated in the opening 
of the Memorial Hall Building located at the former 
Memorial Building. 

S-C Management Corporation is the Managing Agent for Oak 
Hill and Memorial Hall. 

The Authority was approached by S-C Management Corp. 
requesting funding through the Housing Choice Voucher 
Program, formerly Section 8, administered by the Ipswich 
Housing Authority. 

The Ipswich Housing Authority supplied seven (7) Project- 
Based Housing Choice Vouchers to S-C Management Corp, in 
July 2004, in order to save the Memorial Hall Project. 

The Ipswich Housing Authority retains full control and 
administration of the project based subsidy, including 
tenant selection, recertification, inspections, etc. 

With the assistance and dedications between the Ipswich 
Housing Authority and S-C Management Corp., seven (7) units 
of affordable housing for low income elders has been 
established in the Ipswich Community. 



136 



******** 



IPSWICH CULTURAL COUNCIL 

Dorothy Laurence, Chair 

Massachusetts Cultural Council allocated Ipswich Cultural 
Council $2,000 for grants to be awarded to organizations 
and individual artists supporting cultural activities that 
benefit our town. An additional $3 00 from the sale of art 
work at the Ipswich Art Show and a re -grant of $400 made a 
total of $2,750 granted to eight successful applicants from 
a pool of seventeen. Applicants who were awarded grants 
represent a variety of fields including visual arts, music, 
literature and dance. A Public Web Page is available for 
complete grant information at 
www. mass -culture . org/lcc_public . asp 

The Eighteenth Annual Art Show, held at EBSCO Publishing 
and chaired by Dorothy Laurence, included a wide variety of 
visual art forms, a Poetry Reading and Interpretive Dance 
Performance . 

ICC meetings at Town Hall are open to the public. New 
members are welcome. 

******** 

OPEN SPACE COMMITTEE 

Glenn Hazelton and Carl Nylen, Co-Chairs 

During 2004 the Open Space Committee worked with the 
Planning Board to review new subdivision plans. To do 
this, the Committee looked at the character of the lands 
surrounding the proposed projects and considered habitats, 
trails, and environmental issues under evaluation criteria 
developed by the OSC and the Planning Board several years 
ago. The Committee is also working to finalize a more 
comprehensive set of evaluation criteria for lands of 
conservation interest under the Open Space Bond program. 

We have also been working with the Planning Department in 
laying the groundwork to establish management plans for 
town-owned open space. The focus of this effort has been 
on the parcels newly acquired or otherwise protected under 
the bond. This program has been largely dormant in fiscal 
year 2005 as the Bond Administrator position was unfilled 
for half the year and efforts to fill it were unsuccessful. 



137 



Luckily, Tracie Hines, the former administrator, agreed to 
return for one day a week during the second half. Although 
this has been enough to deal with a few critical issues, it 
is far less than the minimum of 3 hours a week the job 
requires. We are working to assure that the position will 
be filled in the near future. 




A volunteer cleanup day was held in November 2004 

at Dow Brook Conservation Area. Trash in the amount of 5.5 tons 

was removed in preparation for the new public access trail for 

passive recreation to be constructed in 2005. 

Thank you, Volunteers!!! 

Throughout all this, the Open Space Committee has been 
reworking the Town's five-year Open Space and Recreation 
Plan - this time with reference to the recently issued 
Ipswich Town Character Statement and the Ipswich Community 
Development Plan. The Open Space Plan must be revised and 
resubmitted to the State Division of Conservation Services 
in order for the Town to be eligible for matching land 
acquisition grants. The new plan will be on the Town web 
site with copies available from the Town Clerk. This is 
the third edition of the Open Space Plan that this 
committee has drafted, with the usual input from the other 
Town boards and committees. As always, we welcome 
interested citizens to our meetings. 



138 



HALL -HASKELL HOUSE COMMITTEE 

Terri Stephens/Stephanie Gaskins 
Co-chair, Hall Haskell House Committee 

The Hall-Haskell House, as its own entity, continues to 
grow from strength to strength. As committee members it 
has been wonderful to create, plan and participate in its 
growth . 

The Ipswich Visitor Center is open on weekends in early May 
and then opens its doors seven days a week from Memorial 
Day until the end of October. Its hours are 9:00 a.m. to 
5:00 p.m. Monday thru Saturday and 9:00 a.m. to noon on 
Sunday. Five thousand eight hundred and seventeen visitors 
came to gather information about the area. Sixty-three 
percent of our visitors came from Massachusetts, 6% from 
New England, 11% from the Mid-Atlantic, 7% from the Mid 
West, 6% from the South, 3% from the South West and 5% from 
the West. Three hundred and fifty visitors, or 6%, came 
from other countries. 

Bill Nelson manages the Visitor Center, and Louise Ciolek 
works as the Volunteer Coordinator. Thanks to their 
services to the center, 44 volunteers ranging in age from 
50 to 90, give their time, talent and share their knowledge 
and history of the town with visitors. 

We are always looking for volunteers who enjoy people and 
want to share their love of the town with visitors. Thanks 
so much to Bill, Louise, and all our volunteers for the 
wonderful gift of friendliness and time that they give to 
the center. We extend a special thanks to Ray Morley for 
hosting a thank you party for volunteers. The camaraderie 
is wonderful . 

On October 1, 2005, the Tourism Committee will be 
sponsoring another house tour. Houses for the tour will be 
needed along with volunteers to man the sites. Monies 
raised benefit the Visitor Center, and we thank them for 
their support. 

The gallery at the Hall Haskell House continues to be a 
place for new artists to display their work. It is open 
approximately twenty-eight weeks with more than fifty- five 
artists participating. A variety of mediums and art forms 



139 



are represented. We continue to be impressed with the 
quality of work represented in the gallery. 

Thanks to the Ipswich community for your continued support. 

******** 

BAY CIRCUIT TRAIL COMMITTEE 

Lawrence Eliot, Chair 

The Committee continued to work on the portion of the Bay 
Circuit Trail that goes along the southern edge of the 
Country Club through Conservation land and Marini ' s farm to 
Willowdale State Forest. The Bay Circuit Committee and 
Conservation Commission are working on the location and 
environmental impacts that the construction of this part of 
the trail would create. 

The new Bay Circuit Guide to Walks in and Around Ipswich is 
complete and can be purchased at local stores. The new 
Guide includes: digital maps, new sketches of the flora 
through a grant from the Ipswich Arts Council and text 
revisions as needed. 

The Committee is working with Turner Hill to insure that 
trails are open and are well marked. As land is developed, 
the committee continues to work with the Open Space 
Committee, Planning Board and Conservation Commission to 
ensure that trails are preserved and kept open for the 
enjoyment of residents. 

Guided trail hikes have continued to be organized, 
advertised in the Chronicle, and led by members of the 
Committee. This informal walking/hiking group continues to 
meet at Town Wharf parking lot on Wednesdays at 9:30 a.m. 
to explore local trails. 

******** 

TRUST FUND COMMISSION 

Robert K. Weatherall, Chair 
Edward Michon, Vice Chair 

At the invitation of the Chairman of the Board of 
Selectmen, James W. Foley, the Commission made a 
presentation to the Selectmen in February on the 
desirability of investing the Town's endowment funds for 
growth as well as income. The Commission reported on its 



140 



conversations with other towns with significant endowment 
funds, including Wellesley, Concord, Beverly, Salem, and 
Topsfield, quoting in particular the language of 
Topsfield's investment policy - "to produce a consistent 
stream of income which grows with or greater than inflation 
while increasing the principal at a conservative rate to 
preserve purchasing power over time." The Commission 
declared its intention to move in this direction with the 
trust funds under its control as soon as the current 
vacancy in the position of Town Treasurer was filled. The 
Selectmen gave their general support. 

The Commission voted in March on the size of the 
scholarships to be awarded in 2004 from the various 
scholarship funds under its management, guided by the 
funds' accumulated income in December. In May, it chose 
the recipients where the choice lies with the Commission: 
Brendan Collins to receive $2,000 from the Cornelius 
Thibeault fund; Taryne B. Weagle to receive $1,000 from the 
Marion Ross Humphrey fund; and Daniel Berry to receive 
$1,000 from the Pauline Ross Claxton fund. 

For many years past, the trust funds have been invested in 
a short-to-intermediate bond fund. This year, rising 
interest rates reduced the value of existing bonds and, as 
a consequence, threatened the principal in the trust fund. 
The Town maintained the principal in the funds at par by 
transferring uncommitted fund income. 

The donors of the trust funds and their intentions in 
making their gifts may be found in a leaflet obtainable 
from the Commission chairman, telephone number 978-356- 
2550, e-mail utrum@ipswich . org 

TOWN COMMITTEE ON THE FEOFFEES 

Robert K. Weatherall 

The Town Committee held four meetings during the year - one 
in joint session with the School Committee - to discuss the 
draft of a new trust structure for the Feoffees prepared by 
the Committee and submitted to the School Committee in the 
spring of 2003. 

Key provisions of the draft were that responsibility for 
appointing the Feoffees should henceforth rest with the 



141 



Selectmen, the School Committee, the Finance Committee, and 
the Moderator; that the Feoffees should be bound by the 
open meeting law and the same reporting requirements as 
other Town boards and committees; and that the income from 
the trust should be used "to broaden and enrich the 
education experience of children in the Ipswich Public 
Schools/' not to help finance "the ordinary and regular 
expenses of the schools.'' 

The Town Committee and the School Committee, assisted by 
the School Committee's attorney, took the first steps 
towards preparing an acceptable legal instrument, building 
on these provisions. Among other recommendations, the Town 
Committee urged that the instrument include a provision 
allowing the sale of Little Neck should tenants make an 
acceptable offer to the Feoffees. The School Committee's 
attorney advised that this would complicate getting court 
approval of the new trust document because in his bequest 
of Little Neck to the Feoffees in 1660, the donor 
stipulated that the land not be "sold nor wasted." 

******** 

WATERWAY ADVISORY COMMITTEE 

Kenneth R. Spellman, Chair 

The year 2004 was a blend of something old and something 
new. The "old" was the studying of the feasibility of 
dredging the Ipswich River. The Committee and Harbormaster 
have been in constant communication with the U.S. Army 
Corps of Engineers; and the process continues with hopeful 
signs for the future. 

The "new" was the purchase, construction and constant use 
of the "Lobster Lift" at the Town Wharf. Several 
commercial fishermen have applauded this as a step to 
making their occupation more bearable. 

Another issue undertaken has been the continuing search for 
more areas in Ipswich to be used for accessing the 
beautiful coastline for boaters and the general public 
alike. 

We shall continue to research issues that affect our 
waterways and highly encourage the joint participation of 
the general public and the Waterways Committee on these 
concerns . 



142 



*■*•■*■*••*•*** 



TOWN OF IPSWICH 
AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT OF 1990 

This notice is published pursuant to the requirements of 
the "Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990" as published 
in the Federal Register on July 26, 1991. 

The Town of Ipswich, Massachusetts, advised the public, 
employees, and job applicants that no qualified individual 
with a disability shall, by reason of such disability, be 
excluded from participation in or be denied the benefits of 
the services, programs, activities, or employment 
opportunities in the Town of Ipswich, or be subjected to 
discrimination by the Town. A "qualified individual with a 
disability" means an individual with a disability who, with 
or without reasonable modifications to rules, policies, or 
practices, the removal of architectural, communication, or 
transportation barriers, or the provision of auxiliary aids 
and services, meets the essential eligibility requirements 
for the receipt of services, the participation in programs 
or activities, and access to job opportunities in the Town. 

The Town of Ipswich has designated the following (person or 
office) as the contact to coordinate efforts to comply with 
this requirement. Inquiries should be directed to: 



Name: 
Office: 
Address : 

Phone Number 
Hours : 



Colleen E. Fermon 

ADA Coordinator, Health Office 

Town Hall, 25 Green Street 

Ipswich, MA 01938 

(978)356-6605 

8:00 a.m. - 7:00 p.m. Mondays 

8:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. Tues.-Thurs 

8:00 a.m. - 12:00 noon Fridays 



143 



TOWN OF IPSWICH - FINANCE COMMITTEE 
Fiscal Year 2005 Budget Summary 



BUDGETS SUBJECT TO PROP. 2-1/2 

REVENUES 

State Aid (except dedicated revenue) 
New school revenue in FY2005 
New municipal revenue in FY2005 
Open Space/Water Supply Prol/Rec'n Fund 
Chapter 90 

Unrestricted Free Cash 
\ Other Available Funds 
Estimated Receipts 
Stabilization Fund 
Subtotal - Before Property Taxes 

Taxes at Prop. 2-1/2 Levy Limit 

TOTAL REVENUE SOURCES 


Budgeted 
FY2004 


FY2005 Revenue Projections: 


IncraaaWfdacreaee) 


% 


November 2003 j December 2003 


from FY2004 


$ 4,359,076 
$ 2,500 
$ 95,410 
$ 24.000 
$ 217,701 
% 228,524 
$ 476,950 
$ 2,682,165 
$ 200,000 
$ 8,286,326 

$ 18,468,040 

$ 26,754,366 


$ 4,200,170 

$ 77,189 

$ 14,094 

$ 217,989 

$ 690,741 

$ 367,112 

$ 2,698,250 

$ 

$ 8,265,545 

S 19,485,430 

$ 27,750,975 




* $ (158,906) 
$ (2.500) 

* $ (18,221) 
- $ (9,906) 

* $ 288 

* $ 462,217 
' $ (109,838) 

$ 16,085 
$ (200,000) 
% (20,781) 

$ 1,017,390 

$ 996,609 


-36% 
rve 

01% 
202.3% 
-23.0% 

0.6% 

-0.3% 
5.5% 
3.7% 


MUNICIPAL BUDGET 

Municipal Operating Budget 

New revenue (for FinCom base budget} 

Subtotal - Municipal Operations 

Municipal Capital Budget 
Warrant Articles - Capital 
Subtotal - Municipal Capital 

Total - Municipal Budget 


Budgeted 
FY2004 


Base Budgets 
at 0% increase 


Selectmen'* end 
School Committee's 
Proposed Budget* 

January 20, 2004 


Increase/ 
(decrease) 
from FY 2004 


% 
ncrtas* 

from 
FY02 


$ 9,513,878 
$ 95,410 
$ 9,609,288 

$ 592,567 
$ 24,000 
$ 616,567 

$ 10,225,855 


$ 9,609,288 | 
$ 4,294 j $ 
$ 9,613,582 j % 

$ 586,567 | 

$ -. ! 

$ 586,567 j $ 
$ 10,530,370 | $ 


% 95,410 
S (91,116) 
* 4,294 

$ (5,000) 
$ (24,000) 
$ (30,000) 

$ 304,515 


-100 0% 

-100.0% 
-100.0% 




SCHOOL BUDGET 

School Operating Budget 
Add extra Medicaid reimbursements 
Deduct school choice reimbursement 
Subtotal - School Operations 

School Capital Budget 
Warrant Articles - Capital 
Subtotal - School Capital 

Total - School Budget 


$ 15,003,142 

$ 

$ 15,003,142 

$ 2,500 
$ 2.500 

$ 15,005,642 


$ 14,998,142 
$ 14,998,142 

$;• : 15,635-26? ;: 


% 
$ 


$ (5,000) 

$ (5,000) 

$ (2,500) 
$ (2,500) 

S 629.627 


4.2% 

-99.3% 

53.4% 

0.1% 

0.0% 

-23.2% 

-1.0% 

-2.6% 
3.3% 


IRS Payment 






- 




OTHER EXPENSES 

Unpaid bills 

Whittier/Essex Aggie/Mlnuteman Assessment 

Chapter 90 

Unappropriated local expenses 

State/county assessments 

Overlay 

IRS Rebate - School Project 

Total - Other Expenses 
TOTAL EXPENSES 


$ 16,477 
$ 221,695 
$ 217,701 
$ 361,610 
$ 324,634 
$ 316,792 
$ 63,960 

$ 1,522,869 
$ 26,754,366 


$ 120 

$ 340,037 | 
$ 217,989 ; 
$ 361,610 j 
$ 249,375 i 
$ 313,700 j 
$ - | 

$ 1,482,831 j 
$ 27,648,470 j 




$ (16,357) 

$ 118,342 

$ 288 

$ 

$ (75,259) 

$ (3,092) 

$ (63,960) 

$ (40,038) 
$ 894,104 


AMOUNT UNDERCOVER) 

PROP. 2-1/2 TAX LIMIT |$ 


$ 102,505 j 


j $ 102.505 





Notes: Based on Finance Committee's revenue estimates as of 03/06/04. $46 million new growth estimate for purposes of 
calculating the FY05 levy limit includes anticipates $5MM construction at Turner Hill and $1 1 MM at New England Biolabs. As in 
prior years new revenue (e.g., municipal fee increases, excess Medicaid receipts) will be added to municipal and school base 
budgets. That allows about a 3.75% growth in bottom lines (inclusive of "inside" debt). 



144 



PROPOSED MUNICIPAL OPERATING BUDGET FOR TOWN MEETING ACTION 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT: ADMINISTRATION & LEGAL 

[Expenditure columns do not reflect encumbrances 
122 SELECTMEN: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 



113 MODERATOR: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Total 

123 TOWN MANAGER: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Labor Consultants 
Capital Outlay 
Total 



FY2002 


FY2003 


FY2004 * 


FY2005 


EXPENDED 

kL 


EXPENDED 


APPROP. 


RECOMMEND 


•] 

$5,990 


$5,956 


$6,320 


$6,320 


8,138 


7,053 


10,427 


10,533 














14,128 


13,009 


16,747 


16,853 


200 


200 


200 


200 














200 


200 


200 


200 


139,605 


143,803 


144,261 


144,261 


12,125 


12,092 


15,086 


13,574 


17,775 


21,079 


26,000 


26,000 















169,505 176,974 



185.347 



183,835 



124 LEGAL: 

Town Counsel-Litigation 
Town Counsel Expenses 
Total 

131 FINANCE COMMITTEE: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Total 

TOTAL GENERAL GOVERNMENT: 
ADMINISTRATION & LEGAL 



77,767 


28,620 


52,000 


47,000 














77,767 


28,620 


52,000 


47,000 


1,999 


2,678 


2,352 


2,352 


5,027 


4,746 


6,150 


6,150 


7,026 


7,424 


8,502 


8,502 



268,626 



226,227 



262,796 



256,390 



FINANCE DEPARTMENT 



134 ACCOUNTANT: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 



134,482 

5,311 



139,793 



138,547 

4,222 



142,769 



139.512 

6,487 



145,999 



139,266 

7,735 



147,001 



136 PURCHASING & BUDGET 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 



34,020 

4,811 



38,831 



34,842 

3,614 



38.456 



36,069 

5.035 



41,104 



35,938 

7,460 



43,398 



145 



PROPOSED MUNICIPAL OPERATING BUDGET FOR TOWN MEETING ACTION 

FY2002 FY2003 FY2004* FY2005 

EXPENDED EXPENDED APPROP. RECOMMEND 



137 ASSESSORS: 
Salaries & Wages 
Consultants 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

138 TREASURER/COLLECTOR: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 

Capital Outlay 
Total 

154 MANAGEMENT INFO. SYSTEMS 
Salaries & Wages 

Expenses 
Capita! Outlay 
Total 

155 GIS DEPARTMENT 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

161 TOWN CLERK: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

162 ELECTIONS & REGISTRATIONS: 
Salaries & Wages 

Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

TOTAL FINANCE DEPARTMENT 

PUNNING & DEVELOPMENT DEPARTMENT 



144,529 

4,700 

8,669 

30,218 

188,116 


146,560 

4,000 

7,491 



158,051 


148,253 

4,000 

12,132 



164,385 


149,259 

4,000 

14,665 



167,924 


147,373 

16,922 



164,295 


153,129 

21,411 



174,540 


170,102 

35,855 



205,957 


156,329 

28,345 



184,674 


52,320 

54,693 



107,013 


53,701 

31,682 



85,383 


53,890 

29,880 



83,770 


53,890 

51,173 



105,063 


























78,754 
8,220 
4,300 

91,274 


82,106 

7,469 



89,575 


82,571 

5,530 



88,101 


82,571 

5,655 



88,226 


12,040 

8,523 



20,563 


18,408 

10,008 



28,416 


16,006 

9,965 



25,971 


15,837 

10,915 



26,752 



749,885 717,190 



755,287 



763,038 



171 PLANNING BOARD: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 



95,819 


100,398 


102,408 


110,152 


5,781 


4,531 


7,305 


6,705 


3,948 











105,548 


104,929 


109,713 


116,857 



146 



PROPOSED MUNICIPAL OPERATING BUDGET FOR TOWN MEETING ACTION 

FY2002 FY2003 FY2004* FY2005 

EXPENDED EXPENDED APPROP. RECOMMEND 



172 PLANNING & DEVELOPMENT CONTRACTS: 
Salaries & Wages 

Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

173 CONSERVATION COMMISSION: 
Salaries & Wages 

Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

175 HISTORICAL COMMISSION: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

TOTAL PLANNING & DEVELOPMENT 






500 


500 


500 


7,244 


6,724 


7,401 


7,496 














7,244 


7,224 


7,901 


7,996 


54,725 


57,549 


57,951 


57,908 


2,319 


1,231 


2,730 


2,950 














57,044 


58,780 


60,681 


60,858 














350 


3,603 


2,940 


2,940 














350 


3,603 


2,940 


2,940 



170,186 



174,536 181,235 



188,651 



PUBLIC SAFETY DEPARTMENT 



210 POLICE: 

Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 

Ambulance Contract 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

220 FIRE. 

Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

233 EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

292 ANIMAL CONTROL: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 



1,663,394 


1,713,714 


1,767,704 


1 1,807,844 


103,208 


84,660 


108,173 


113,820 


146,378 


346,380 


347,000 


370,880 


87,491 





17,750 





2,000,471 


2,144,754 


2,240,627 


2,292,544 


1,072,902 


1,065,317 


1,078,258 


1,080,117 


93,787 


66,300 


78,320 


78,350 


9,158 











1,175,847 


1,131,617 


1,156,578 


1,158,467 


3,679 


4,101 


6,277 


6,277 


1,673 


2,077 


2,070 


2,670 














5,352 


6,178 


8,347 


8,947 


38,326 


41,419 


44,834 


48,233 


5,173 


4,189 


6,247 


7,344 














43,499 


45,608 


51,081 


55,577 



147 



PROPOSED MUNICIPAL OPERATING BUDGET FOR TOWN MEETING ACTION 

FY2002 FY2003 FY2004* FY2005 

EXPENDED EXPENDED APPROP. RECOMMEND 



295 HARBORS: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

295 SHELLFISH: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

TOTAL PUBLIC SAFETY DEPT. 



10,504 


10,486 


11,011 


12,084 


10,270 


8,257 


11,571 


' 11,152 














20,774 


18,743 


22,582 


23,236 


40,944 


42,542 


42,648 


42,648 


4,945 


3,634 


4,129 


5,282 














45,889 


46,176 


46,777 


47,930 



3,291,832 3,393,076 3,525,992 3,586,701 



PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT 



421 ADMINISTRATION: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

422 EQUIPMENT MAINTENANCE: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 

Capital Outlay 
Total 



103,151 


108,772 


120,623 


112,709 


3,054 


3,806 


6,626 


7,438 








1,000 





106,205 


112,578 


128,249 


120,147 


42,803 


44,266 


45,380 


44,884 


49,246 


44,992 


43,759 


44,597 


3,100 











95,149 


89,258 


89,139 


89,481 



423 SNOW & ICE CONTROL: 
Expenses 



125,467 270,002 



132,564 



132,564 



424 HIGHWAY: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 

Road Treatment 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

425 FORESTRY: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 



272,665 


291,823 


291,351 


292,140 


130,387 


104,483 


173,537 


171,137 


295,161 


83,246 


302,798 


302,798 


134,655 


16,200 








832,868 


495,752 


767,686 


766,075 


77,019 


76,935 


82,988 


83,310 


11,863 


12,767 


20,074 


19,961 


17,547 











106,429 


89,702 


103,062 


103,271 



148 



PROPOSED MUNICIPAL OPERATING BUDGET FOR TOWN MEETING ACTION 



FY2002 FY2003 FY2004* FY2005 

EXPENDED EXPENDED APPROP. RECOMMEND 



431 SANITATION CONTRACT: 










Sanitation Composite Contract 














Expenses 


694,872 


751,024 


784,855 


830,425 


Capital Outlay 














Total 


694,872 


751,024 


784,855 


830,425 


432 SOLID WASTE TRANSFER STATION: 










Salaries & Wages 


36,496 


28,024 


11,774 


11,804 


Expenses 


11,188 


13,839 


8,466 


8,727 


Capital Outlay 














Total 


47,684 


41,863 


20,240 


20,531 


471 DISTRICT COURT BUILDING MAINTENANCE: 










Salaries & Wages 


31,329 


16,930 


33,709 





Expenses 


20,354 


19,231 


22,106 


19,196 


Capital Outlay 





775 





1,820 


Total 


51,683 


36,936 


55,815 


21,016 


472 CONSOLIDATED BUILDING MAINTENANCE: 










Salaries & Wages 


79,634 


121,661 


137,095 


134,336 


Expenses 


83,242 


187,602 


193,720 


205,038 


Capital Outlay 


2,950 











Total 


165,826 


309,263 


330,815 


339,374 


491 CEMETERIES, PARKS & BUILDING MAINTENANCE: 










Salaries & Wages 


261,207 


273,793 


295,762 


263,261 


Expenses 


35,206 


29,174 


32,086 


35,246 


Road Treatment 














Capital Outlay 


7,868 


12,587 


6,000 





Total 


304,281 


315,554 


333,848 


298,507 



TOTAL PUBLIC WORKS DEPT. 



2,530,464 2,511,932 2,746,273 2,721,391 



CODE ENFORCEMENT DEPARTMENT 



251 BUILDING INSPECTION: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

174 APPEALS BOARD: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 



105,473 


106,673 


107,744 


109,105 


5,828 


4,742 


5,927 


6,393 











15,000 


111,301 


111,415 


113,671 


130,498 


17,323 


17,855 


17,978 


17,909 


2,139 


2,547 


2,912 


2,612 














19,462 


20,402 


20,890 


20,521 



149 



PROPOSED MUNICIPAL OPERATING BUDGET FOR TOWN MEETING ACTION 



512 HEALTH: 

Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

529 HEALTH CONTRACTS: 
Expenses 
Consultants 
Total 

TOTAL CODE ENFORCEMENT 

HUMAN SERVICES DEPARTMENT 



FY2002 FY2003 FY2004* FY2005 

EXPENDED EXPENDED APPROP. RECOMMEND 



69,249 


79,335 


82,911 


82,133 


32,216 


36,333 


42,930 


44,081 














101,465 


115,668 


125,841 


126,214 


235,159 


11,063 


11,063 


11,063 


2,955 


2,291 


3,500 


3,500 


238,114 


13,354 


14,563 


14,563 



470,342 



260,839 



274,965 



291,796 



620 RECREATION AND YOUTH SERVICES: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 


111,928 

20,382 



132,310 


110,485 

18,801 



129,286 


109,917 

18,384 



128,301 


109,157 

19,542 



128,699 


541 COUNCIL ON AGING: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 


64,579 

12,436 



77,015 


73,126 

8,274 



81,400 


78,729 

10,384 



89,113 


78,528 

11,006 



89,534 


543 VETERANS' BENEFITS: 
Expenses 
Totai 


22,890 
22,890 


31,083 
31,083 


28,000 
28,000 


32,000 
32,000 



TOTAL HUMAN SERVICES DEPT. 



232,215 241,769 



245,414 



250,233 



LIBRARY 

610 LIBRARY: 

Salaries & Wages 

Expenses 

Capital Outlay 

TOTAL LIBRARY DEPT 

UNCLASSIFIED 



307,277 

131,422 

9,112 



447,811 



299,505 

109,683 





305,985 

112,510 





409,188 418,495 



306,199 

116,025 





422,224 



132 RESERVE FUND: (Transfers dispersed into appropriate budgets in prior years) 





40,595 



53.426 



150 



PROPOSED MUNICIPAL OPERATING BUDGET FOR TOWN MEETING ACTION 

FY2002 FY2003 FY2004* FY2005 

EXPENDED EXPENDED APPROP. RECOMMEND 



191 BENEFITS: 

Military Service Credits 
County Retirement System 
Health & Life 
Medicare 

Consolidated Benefits 
TOTAL BENEFITS 



997,763 
997,763 



1,059,531 
1,059,531 



1,100,763 
1,100,763 



1,145,693 
1,145,693 



192 INSURANCE: 



! 30,482 



172.772 



245.685 



246,359 



193 OFFICE SUPPLIES & EQUIPMENT: 
Wages 
Expenses 

193 SALARY TRANSFER ACCOUNT: ** 



6,506 
86,324 



3,132 
86,873 



3,375 
102,800 

35,000 



3,375 
100,435 

127,502 



DEBT SERVICE: 










Payment of Long Term Interest 


287,916 


432,370 


437,135 


415,931 


Payment of Long Term Principal 


315,000 


768,000 


665,000 


890,324 


Payment of Short Term Principal 








43,769 





Interest on Antic. Notes; Debt Issuance Fees 


131,578 


49,695 


50,577 


14,615 


Total 


734,494 


1,250,065 


1,196,481 


1,320,870 


TOTAL UNCLASSIFIED: 


1,955,569 


2,572,373 


2,724,699 


2,997,660 


TOTAL OPERATING BUDGET:"* 


$10,116,930 


$10,507,130 


$11,135,156 


$11,478,084 



* Note: FY2003 reflects Reserve Fund transfers through November 30,2002. 
"Represents allowance for salary /wage increases; appropriations approved in 
prior years have been dispersed into individual department budgets. 



151 



INTRODUCTION: Action by the Annual Town Meeting, Monday, April 5, 2004, will establish the amount of money to be set 
aside for schools. Once this budget total is established, the School Committee, by statute, has fiscal autonomy and may 
use the funds in the best interest of the schools. The Town of Ipswich School Budget, which follows, represents the School: 
Committee's best estimate of the way funds voted at Town Meeting will be utilized. 



FY 2005 
Summary of Recommended Operating Budget 
Doyon Elementary School: Projected enrollment 494 
students 

fy 04 Percent 

Recommended Recommended FY 04 Budget FY 2003 Change 

FY '04 
Description FY05FTE FY 05 Budget FTE Expended to '05 

Undistributed Subtotal 

SPED Preschool 

Subtotal 

Classroom Instruction 

Subtotal 

Instructional Support 

Subtotal 

Health Subtotal 

Guidance Subtotal 

SPED/SPED Summer 

Subtotal 

Principal's Office 

Subtotal 

Building Operations 

Subtotal 

Total Doyon 

Appropriated 

Budget 



60.39 



974,367 


1,043,854 


1,058,133 


83,857 


71,190 


64,880 


372,721 


368,399 


360,339 


25,355 


24,236 


55,466 


38,206 


35,860 


34,729 


61,715 


60,235 


60,111 


626,485 


600,501 


564,594 


164,349 


161,490 


161,188 


164,437 


161,733 


195,043 


2,511,492 59.94 $2,527,498 


$2,554,483 



Winthrop Elementary School: Projected enrollment 
495 students 



Undistributed Subtotal 

SPED Preschool 

Subtotal 

Classroom Instruction 

Subtotal 

Instructional Support 

Subtotal 

Health Subtotal 

Guidance Subtotal 

SPED/SPED Summer 

Subtotal 

Principal's Office 

Subtotal 

Building Operations 

Subtotal 

Co-curricular Subtotal 
Total Winthrop 
Appropriated 
Budget 



1,085,868 


1,090,642 


$69,215 


$57,365 


378,852 


368,289 


27,194 


34,900 


47,793 


47,238 


42,385 


40,529 


587,468 


602,551 


162,295 


166,160 


138.282 


217,263 





6,604 



-0.63% 



57.83 



1,045,911 

95,552 

365,211 

26,276 
48,746 
44,964 

630,088 

165,052 

175,866 




2,597,666 59.35 $2,539,352 $2,631,542 2.30% 



152 



Ipswich Middle School: Projected enrollment 501 
students 



Description 



fy 04 Percent 

Recommended Recommended FY 04 Budget FY 2003 Change 

FY '04 
FY05FTE FY 05 Budget FTE Expended to *05 



Undistributed Subtotal 
English-Language 
Arts Subtotal 

Math Subtotal 

Science Subtotal 

Social Studies 

Subtotal 

World Languages 

Subtotal 

Art Subtotal 

Music Subtotal 
PE-Health Instruction 
Subtotal 

Technology Subtotal 

Life Skills Subtotal 

Library/AV Subtotal 
Integrated 
Technology 
Extended Learning 
Program 

Health Subtotal 

Guidance Subtotal 

SPED Subtotal 

ESL Subtotal 
Principal's Office 
Subtotal 

Athletic/Co-curricular 
Subtotal 
Total Middle 
School Approp. 
Budget 



98,682 



$84,298 



$73,202 



298,078 


324,148 


324,445 


281,990 


270,824 


290,806 


266,854 


281,095 


273,683 


253,939 


254,915 


260,229 


108,834 


107,514 


103,846 


48,814 


46,185 


44,409 


135,628 


123,977 


123,798 


113,868 


122,475 


122,642 


56,596 


56,837 


49,218 





67,585 


67,028 


46,905 


45,597 


45,651 








1,269 








9,858 


33,260 


30,194 


30,543 


74,707 


73,252 


64,183 


533,970 


510,381 


539,194 


6,000 


6,000 





235,314 


228,890 


232,823 


30,295 


30,295 


$27,014 



51.39 



2,623,734 53.52 $2,664,462 $2,683,841 -1.53% 



153 



Ipswich High School: Projected enrollment 656 
students 



Description 

Undistributed Subtotal 
English-Language 
Arts Subtotal 

Math Subtotal 

Science Subtotal 

Social Studies 

Subtotal 

World Languages 

Subtotal 

Art Subtotal 

Music Subtotal 
PE-Health Instruction 
Subtotal 
Technology 
Education Subtotal 
Child Development 
Subtotal 

Business Subtotal 

Library Subtotal 

Health Subtotal 

Guidance Subtotal 

SPED Subtotal 

ESL Subtotal 
Principal's Office 
Subtotal 

Athletics Subtotal 
Co-Curricular 
Subtotal 
High School 



FY 04 
Recommended Recommended FY 04 Budget 

FY 05 FTE FY 05 Budget FTE 



109,497 



158,064 

75,081 

28,168 

39,975 

48,855 

30,507 

169,549 

985,728 

4,250 

278,962 
203,451 

11,666 



$75,683 



148,688 
71,251 



38,247 



Percent 
FY 2003 Change 
FY '04 
Expended to '05 

$96,129 



378,210 


360,824 


334,703 


369,193 


339,918 


327,073 


365,013 


357,178 


304,277 


280,972 


275,209 


260,307 


297,240 


295,038 


279,196 


94,179 


88,763 


84,910 


140,807 


127,463 


123,679 



140,638 



65,011 



22,361 


20,742 


48,398 


45,965 


46,224 


47,753 


29,046 


29,880 


175,807 


148,577 


879,594 


776,912 


4,250 





271,321 


265,731 


189,737 


202,601 



34,306 



Total 


68.08 


4,069,367 


68.49 $3,845,000 


$3,588,390 


5.84% 


Middle/High 












School 












Operations 




567,702 


514,517 


693,972 




Middle/High 












School 












Operations 


7.50 


567,702 


7.50 $514,517 


$693,972 


10.34% 



154 



District Wide Instruction, Administration and Services 














FY 04 




Percent 




Recommended Recommended 


FY 04 


Budget 


FY 2003 


Change 
FY '04 


Description 


FY 05 FTE FY 05 Budget 


FTE 




Expended 


to '05 


All District Curric. & 












Prof. Devel. 


257,865 




$136,920 


$114,442 




Support Services 












Subtotal 


158,905 




156,919 


150,378 




DW Pupil Personnel 












(SPED) Subtotal 


338,809 




268,508 


299,252 




School Committee 












Subtotal 


11,880 




9,280 


10,656 




Superintendent's 












Office Subtotal 


217,825 




218,994 


197,404 




Finance & Personnel 












Subtotal 


252.368 




260,268 


233,282 




Fixed Costs Subtotal 
Buildings & 


1,634,543 




1,499,781 


1,433,210 





Operations Subtotal 




69,979 




121,343 


60,068 




Debt Service Subtotal 














(w/in levy limit) 




195,924 




131,078 


133,260 




Transportation 














Subtotal 




127,200 




109,043 


340,215 




District Wide 














Total 


11.50 


3,265,298 


11.50 


$2,912,134 


$2,972,167 


12.13% 


Projected 














Enrollment 2146 














Students 














Appropriated 














School Budget 


256.69 


15,635,259 


260.30 


15,002,963 


15,124,395 


4.21% 


Capital Debt Service 














(High-Middle 














School) 




2,580,628 




$2,569,752 


$2,565,877 




School Budget 














Grand Total 




18,215,887 




17,572,715 


17,690,272 


3.66% 



155 



TRUSTEES OF THE IPSWICH PUBLIC LIBRARY 

STATEMENT OF FUNDS ACTIVITY 
July 1,2003 to June 30, 2004 



Operating Fnods 




Beginning Balance 


$ 86,704.88 


Interest/Dividends 


$ 15,965.22 


Donations, Bequests, Grants 


$ 5,256.44 


Books, Publications Purchased 


$ (6,814.08) 


Building, Grounds, Operations, Misc 


$ (3,689.23) 


Children's activities 


$ (9,865.13) 


Restricted principal in Money Mkt 


$ (1,385.95) 


Ending Balance 


S 86,172.15 


Restricted Funds 




Markss Fund for Hellenic Culture 




Beginning Balance in CD 


$ 2,854.13 


Interest Income 


$ 65.69 


TXFR new principal in 


$ 750.00 


TXFR to Operating Funds 


$ (65.69) 


Ending Balance in CD 


$ 3,604.13 


Principal in Money Market 


$ 503.28 


Ending Total 


$ 4,107.41 


Fidelity Mutual Fund 




Beginning Balance 


$ 3,419.59 


Interest Income 


$ 27.31 


Ending Balance 


$ 3,446.90 


Library Trust Fund 




Beginning Balance in CD 


$ 56,727.27 


Interest Income 


$ 1,876.34 


TXFR to Operating Funds 


$ (27.51) 


Ending Balance in CD 


$ 58,576.10 


Johnson Principal in Money Market 


$ 882.67 


Ending Total 


$ 59,458.77 


Helen St John Fund 




Beginning Balance 


$384,000.00 


Interest Income 


$ 14,419.84 


TXFR to Operating Funds 


S (14,419.84) 


Ending Balance 


$384,000.00 



156 



BURLEY EDUCATION FUND 

Balance on hand January 1,2004 $41,956.03 

Income from funds for year 2004 as follows: 
Interest: Ipswich Co-operative Bank 

Term Deposit Certificates... $1,440.81 

Expenditures for the year 2004 as follows: 

Winthrop School Literacy Program $2,000.00 

Balance on hand January 1, 2005 as follows: 

Ipswich Co-operative Bank 

Term Deposit Certificates $41,396.84 

Respectfully submitted 
Burley Education Fund 



V. James DiFazio 
Treasurer 



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IPSWICH PUBLIC LIBRARY 



3 2122 00167 880 8 



THE TOWN OF IPSWICH AT YOUR 
SERVICE 

A handy Check-List of Often-Used 

Town Services: 

978 Area Code: 

Administration 

Town Manager 356-6609 

Accounting 

Finance Director 356-6601 

Ambulance 

Business 356-9800 

Emergency 911 

Assessments 

Assessors 356-6603 

Building & Health 

Building Inspector 356-6605 

Code Enforcement 356-6605 

Gas Inspector 356-0523 

Health Agent 356-6605 

Plumbing Inspector 356-0523 

Business Association 356-9055 

Cemetery & Parks 

Office 356-6643 

Civil Defense 

Emergency Management. . .356-6645 

Council on Aging 356-6650 

Court 

Third District Court. . .462-2652 

Crane Beach 

Gate 356-4354 

Castle Hill 356-4351 

Dog Officer 

Dog Pound 356-6652 

Animal Control Officer. 356-4343 

Electric Department 

Office 356-6635 

Fire Department 

Business 356-4321 

Emergency 911 

Fire Prevention 356-6631 

Harbormaster 356-4343 

Historical Society 356-2811 



Housing Authority 

Office 356-2860 

Ipswich Chronicle. . .412-1805 

Library 356-6648 

Mosquito Control. .. .474-4640 

Parking Clerk 356-6611 

Planning & Development 

Town Planner 356-6607 

Planning Board. .. .356-6607 

Conservation 356-6661 

Police Department 

Business 356-4343 

Emergency 911 

Shellfish Info 356-6671 

Public Works Department 

Office 356-6612 

Recycling 356-6612 

Trash Collection. .356-6612 
Purchasing Office. . .356-6608 
Recreation Department 

Office 356-6644 

Registry of Motor. 800-858-392 
School Department 

Administration. . . .356-2935 

High School 356-3137 

Middle School 356-3535 

Winthrop School. . .356-2976 

Doyon School 356-5506 

Selectmen 

Office 356-6604 

Town Clerk 

Office 356-6600 

Treasurer /Collector 

Office 356-6610 

Veterans Services 

Veterans Agent ... .356-3915 
Water Department 

Office 356-6637 

Water Treatment 356-6639 

Utilities 356-6635 

MIS Department 356-6670 

Visitors Center 356-8540